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* In the episode "Living Doll", Talky Tina says "you better be nice to me!" after she [[spoiler: murders Erich]], which implies her motives are selfish and she didn't do it to protect Christie. It's impossible to get rid of or destroy Tina, so Christie's stuck with a vindictive, homicidal magic doll, possibly forever. So...what happens to Christie if she gets a new favorite toy, or when she starts outgrowing dolls?

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* In the episode "Living Doll", Talky Tina says "you better be nice to me!" after she [[spoiler: murders Erich]], which implies [[NotSoWellIntentionedExtremist her motives are selfish selfish]] and she didn't do it to protect Christie. It's impossible to get rid of or destroy Tina, so Christie's stuck with a vindictive, homicidal magic doll, possibly forever. So...what happens to Christie if she gets a new favorite toy, or when she starts outgrowing dolls?

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*** The episode and it's sequel don't back the idea of Anthony constantly reading everyone's mind up, regardless of what Rod says in the intro. The drunk guy was no doubt thinking bad thoughts about Anthony, but Anthony only reacted when he began talking. And while drunk, he suggests killing Anthony with a fire poker, and another character grabs it as if it might work (though to be fair, neither was probably thinking straight at the time.) And in the sequel episode, people explicitly discuss killing Anthony when he's not around, and a man tries to hit Anthony in the back of the head, and Anthony doesn't react until his also-powered daughter banished the man, also suggesting an plotted ambush will work.

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** The manager also tells him, "Remember, you have unlimited credit," implying that any betting he does is part of the prize his wife won. In reality, it just means that the casino would cash his checks (or other markers) and he's out the money instead.

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** In Grand Theft Auto, you're actually ''playing'' -- it's a genuine test of your skill that can lead to success or failure depending on how well you do. You don't get to tell the game at the beginning to make sure you win. Even if Rocky literally had a video game to play in this setting, he would win every time, which would get boring just like winning the casino games every time did (and, as he concludes, having Pip make him lose sometimes wouldn't help because it still wouldn't be real). The problem isn't the bank robbery scenario wouldn't be a real robbery -- it's that the risk and test and skill involved wouldn't be real. There's no market for any kind of game that guarantees you win every time (or even where you get to determine how often you'll win and lose).


** Another moment of fridge brilliance from the episode. By the end, Peter is convinced he's "All steel; no softness, no weakness." Only when the police finally come down on him he breaks. As much as he claims to be without softness, one of steel's important points is that it is relatively able to flex and move in order to carry heavy loads. Peter has no idea what steel's true strength is, just like how he has no idea just how vital sentiment and kindness are to a man.

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** Another moment of fridge brilliance from the episode. By the end, Peter is convinced he's "All steel; no softness, no weakness." Only when the police finally come down on him he breaks. As much as he claims to be without softness, one of steel's important points is that it is relatively able to flex and move in order to carry heavy loads. Peter has no idea what steel's true strength is, [[VirtueIsWeakness just like how he has no idea just how vital sentiment and kindness are to a man.man]].

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** Also, there's a good chance Mrs. Gibbs is going to be suffering from survivor's guilt, as she was so gung-ho about the Las Vegas vacation in the first place.

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** A chilling alternate take on the ending: Hyder has shown that there's something he'd rather have than God. That IS the essence of damnation!


* At the end of "Will the real Martian please stand up?", Ross doesn't know what the word "wet" means. It's reasonable why: either he hasn't heard the term yet during his tenure on Earth, or Martians, hailing from a dry planet, [[LanguageEqualsThought don't have an equivalent to it in their language.]]

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* At the end of "Will the real Martian please stand up?", Ross doesn't know what the word "wet" means. It's reasonable why: either he hasn't heard the term yet during his tenure time on Earth, or Martians, hailing from a dry planet, [[LanguageEqualsThought don't have an equivalent to it in their language.]]



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* At the end of "Will the real Martian please stand up?", Ross doesn't know what the word "wet" means. It's reasonable why: either he hasn't heard the term yet during his tenure on Earth, or Martians, hailing from a dry planet, [[LanguageEqualsThought don't have an equivalent to it in their language.]]


* The episode "I am the Night- Color me Black" is full of this. The sun doesn't rise over a town on the day of an innocent man's execution. It remains pitch black well into the afternoon. Still, the whole town turns out to watch. He says he'll gladly give them a show, but not the satisfaction of his apology. After his hanging, the town's reverend realizes what the darkness is: hate. The hate they felt toward him, the hate he felt toward them, all of it coming up and choking them all. The same thing happens in many other places filled with hate around the world, including Alabama, the Berlin Wall, [[RedChina Shanghai]], a political prison in Budapest and all of North Vietnam. These areas will more than likely freeze over without any sunlight. Worse, since the cause is human emotion, it doesn't matter where refugees might go; as along as someone hates someone else, the darkness will follow. In a time like the 1960s, when the Cold War was at its height it could grow to cover the whole world.

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* The episode "I am the Night- Color me Black" is full of this. The sun doesn't rise over a town on the day of an innocent man's execution. It remains pitch black well into the afternoon. Still, the whole town turns out to watch. He says he'll gladly give them a show, but not the satisfaction of his apology. After his hanging, the town's reverend realizes what the darkness is: hate. The hate they felt toward him, the hate he felt toward them, all of it coming up and choking them all. The same thing happens in many other places filled with hate around the world, including Alabama, the Berlin Wall, [[RedChina Shanghai]], a political prison in Budapest and all of North Vietnam. These areas will more than likely freeze over without any sunlight. Worse, since the cause is human emotion, it doesn't matter where refugees might go; as along as someone hates someone else, the darkness will follow. In a time like the 1960s, when the Cold War was at its height height, it could grow to cover the whole world.


* The episode "I am the Night- Color me Black" is full of this. The sun doesn't rise over a town on the day of an innocent man's execution. It remains pitch black well into the afternoon. Still, the whole town turns out to watch. He says he'll gladly give them a show, but not the satisfaction of his apology. After his hanging, the town's reverend realizes what the darkness is: hate. The hate they felt toward him, the hate he felt toward them, all of it coming up and choking them all. The same thing happens in many other places filled with hate around the world, including Birmingham, Alabama and all of North Vietnam. These areas will more than likely freeze over without any sunlight. Worse, since the cause is human emotion, it doesn't matter where refugees might go; as along as someone hates someone else, the darkness will follow. In a time like the 1960s, it could grow to cover the whole world.

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* The episode "I am the Night- Color me Black" is full of this. The sun doesn't rise over a town on the day of an innocent man's execution. It remains pitch black well into the afternoon. Still, the whole town turns out to watch. He says he'll gladly give them a show, but not the satisfaction of his apology. After his hanging, the town's reverend realizes what the darkness is: hate. The hate they felt toward him, the hate he felt toward them, all of it coming up and choking them all. The same thing happens in many other places filled with hate around the world, including Birmingham, Alabama Alabama, the Berlin Wall, [[RedChina Shanghai]], a political prison in Budapest and all of North Vietnam. These areas will more than likely freeze over without any sunlight. Worse, since the cause is human emotion, it doesn't matter where refugees might go; as along as someone hates someone else, the darkness will follow. In a time like the 1960s, when the Cold War was at its height it could grow to cover the whole world.



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* One of the sticking bits in "The Encounter" was that Arthur's father was allegedly a traitor at Pearl Harbor. The reality was that there ''were'' no traitors, even though it was a common conspiracy theory at the time. But Arthur was four years old at the time, too young to really comprehend what was happening. And like the [[Creator/GeorgeTakei fellow who played him]], he was probably shipped to an interment camp during the war. His father was likely falsely accused by fellows looking for an easy scapegoat, and was never able to disprove them, meaning Arthur believed the accusation, even though it was baseless.
* Another brilliance bit from "The Encounter" - We have a Fenton, a stockier white veteran with PTSD, who has consumed a fair amount of alcohol even before Arthur arrives. Arthur is lighter in build, weighs less, and is more likely than Fenton to have a genetic mutation that makes alcohol hit him harder. So, add liquor, weapons, and a stuck door, and it's a tailor-made setup for [[AlcoholInducedStupidity alcohol-fueled tragedy]].



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* Gunter Lütze's fate is already horrifying, but do remember one thing: we only saw the tip of the ice burg. There's ''thousands'' more things he experienced we didn't see. For all intents and purposes, Lütze experienced a painful, agonizing death ''thousands'' of times. No wonder it drove him completely insane. Of course, [[LaserGuidedKarma every single one of those was a death he himself personally inflicted while enjoying every minute of it]], which is FridgeHorror of its own.

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** He doesn't, but that's not really the point. He's the sole survivor of at least his sector of the city, and given how absolutely cruel everyone else depicted has been to him, once he recognizes he's alone and ''happier'' that way, he has absolutely no interest in confirming whether or not he's the last person on Earth. He's got food, books, and easy access to shelter so all of his particular needs are met; as far as he cares, he's "the last man on Earth" and he likes that just fine.

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** I think that's ''why'' the Devil came to him in the first place: the guy had no imagination and thus made for an easy mark


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** This was long before video games were invented. People back then would probably assume that such an idea would feel about as real as children playing make-believe.

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