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* Counts as a StealthPun, too: While all the other original ''Half-Life'' titles were about things coming apart, ''Blue Shift'' was about things coming ''together''. In astronomy, guess what being [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blueshift blue-shifted]] means?

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* Counts as a StealthPun, too: While all the other original ''Half-Life'' titles were about things coming apart, ''Blue Shift'' ''[[VideoGame/HalfLifeBlueShift Blue Shift]]'' was about things coming ''together''. In astronomy, guess what being [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blueshift blue-shifted]] means?



* Ever wonder why the HECU soldiers act so tactically inept in combat? The training section of ''OpposingForce'' gives the answer. You (as Adrian Shephard) are promoted from "Maggot" to "Soldier" in no less than a ''day'', and then immediately assigned to duty. Real soldiers would need months, or even years to prepare for such a large-scale incident like Black Mesa.

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* Ever wonder why the HECU soldiers act so tactically inept in combat? The training section of ''OpposingForce'' ''[[VideoGame/HalfLifeOpposingForce Opposing Force]]'' gives the answer. You (as Adrian Shephard) are promoted from "Maggot" to "Soldier" in no less than a ''day'', and then immediately assigned to duty. Real soldiers would need months, or even years to prepare for such a large-scale incident like Black Mesa.

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** They advise Dr. Breen.

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* Many people have noted that the Gonarch looks like a spider monster with a giant testicle (which WordOfGod confirms is intentional), now keep that in mind and consider that it's main attack involves dousing you with a [[{{Squick}} harmful white fluid]].

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**Probably a universe collapsing into the Big Crunch.


* Given the SharedUniverse, the lore details thrown out in ''Portal 2'' and ''Counter-Strike: Condition Zero'' retroactively add more context to the U.S. government's behavior in the first game. In ''Portal 2'', Cave Johnson is allowed to conduct grievously unsafe and immoral experiments that result in ''many'' deaths without setting off too many alarms, even when they result in his own death. In ''Condition Zero: Deleted Scenes'', global terrorism is depicted as a much more decentralized[[note]]The largest group in the world, stated to be Guerrilla Warfare, has 2,000 members.[[/note]] and dangerous threat than in the contemporary real world. Most notably, two missions feature terrorists seizing a ''nuclear missiles'' in the ex-USSR, but there are other signs such as relatively small groups racking up huge death tolls (e.g. the Elite Crew, with "several hundred members", killing over 3,000), Baltic terrorists deploying [[https://counterstrike.fandom.com/wiki/Harrier jet aircraft]] and [[https://counterstrike.fandom.com/wiki/T-90 main battle tanks]], the apparent presence of a major insurgency in the ''United States'',[[note]]The [[https://counterstrike.fandom.com/wiki/Midwest_Militia Midwest Militia]], only one of the groups fought in U.S.-based maps in ''Condition Zero'', is stated to have killed more than 1,000 government employees.[[/note]] and the sheer number of heavily armed militants your characters end up killing in what are in the real world quiet backwaters, such as [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L72JqlxKbak 100+ terrorists]] based in a small town in rural Veneto, Italy. Together, these games paint a picture of a world that's both more unstable and more callous than in the real world, explaining both the U.S. military's [[FieryCoverUp scorched earth attitude at Black Mesa]] ''and'' said government contractor's [[NoOSHACompliance complete lack of safety standards.]]

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* Given the SharedUniverse, the lore details thrown out in ''Portal 2'' and ''Counter-Strike: Condition Zero'' retroactively add more context to the U.S. government's behavior in the first game. In ''Portal 2'', Cave Johnson is allowed to conduct grievously unsafe and immoral experiments that result in ''many'' deaths without setting off too many alarms, even when they result in his own death. In ''Condition Zero: Deleted Scenes'', global terrorism is depicted as a much more decentralized[[note]]The largest group in the world, stated to be Guerrilla Warfare, has 2,000 members.[[/note]] and dangerous threat than in the contemporary real world. Most notably, two missions feature terrorists seizing a ''nuclear missiles'' in the ex-USSR, but there are other signs such as relatively small groups racking up huge death tolls (e.g. the Elite Crew, with "several hundred members", killing over 3,000), Baltic terrorists deploying [[https://counterstrike.fandom.com/wiki/Harrier jet aircraft]] and [[https://counterstrike.fandom.com/wiki/T-90 main battle tanks]], the apparent presence of a major insurgency in the ''United States'',[[note]]The [[https://counterstrike.fandom.com/wiki/Midwest_Militia Midwest Militia]], only one of the groups fought in U.S.-based maps in ''Condition Zero'', is stated to have killed more than 1,000 government employees.[[/note]] and the sheer number of heavily armed militants your characters end up killing in what are in the real world quiet backwaters, such as [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L72JqlxKbak 100+ terrorists]] based in a small town in rural Veneto, Italy. Together, these games paint a picture of a world that's both more unstable and more callous than in the real world, explaining both the U.S. military's [[FieryCoverUp scorched earth attitude at Black Mesa]] ''and'' said government contractor's [[NoOSHACompliance complete lack of safety standards.]]

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* Given the SharedUniverse, the lore details thrown out in ''Portal 2'' and ''Counter-Strike: Condition Zero'' retroactively add more context to the U.S. government's behavior in the first game. In ''Portal 2'', Cave Johnson is allowed to conduct grievously unsafe and immoral experiments that result in ''many'' deaths without setting off too many alarms, even when they result in his own death. In ''Condition Zero: Deleted Scenes'', global terrorism is depicted as a much more decentralized[[note]]The largest group in the world, stated to be Guerrilla Warfare, has 2,000 members.[[/note]] and dangerous threat than in the contemporary real world. Most notably, two missions feature terrorists seizing a ''nuclear missiles'' in the ex-USSR, but there are other signs such as relatively small groups racking up huge death tolls (e.g. the Elite Crew, with "several hundred members", killing over 3,000), Baltic terrorists deploying [[https://counterstrike.fandom.com/wiki/Harrier jet aircraft]] and [[https://counterstrike.fandom.com/wiki/T-90 main battle tanks]], the apparent presence of a major insurgency in the ''United States'',[[note]]The [[https://counterstrike.fandom.com/wiki/Midwest_Militia Midwest Militia]], only one of the groups fought in U.S.-based maps in ''Condition Zero'', is stated to have killed more than 1,000 government employees.[[/note]] and the sheer number of heavily armed militants your characters end up killing in what are in the real world quiet backwaters, such as [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L72JqlxKbak 100+ terrorists]] based in a small town in rural Veneto, Italy. Together, these games paint a picture of a world that's both more unstable and more callous than in the real world, explaining both the U.S. military's [[FieryCoverUp scorched earth attitude at Black Mesa]] ''and'' said government contractor's [[NoOSHACompliance complete lack of safety standards.]]


Alternatively; the combine HAD to keep all the citizens speaking the same language so their thought police could order them about without being misunderstood

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*** Alternatively; the combine HAD to keep all the citizens speaking the same language so their thought police could order them about without being misunderstood

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* The fate of the scientist and guard from the "Xen Portal" scene, Gordon manages to escape into the portal once it's opened but what did the two of them do since they would then have no one to protect them from the Xen masters swarming the area.


** At one point someone actually asked Marc Laidlaw himself about how Gordon has a HUD if he doesn't have the helmet on. Marc's response was that they didn't actually think about that, and that [[CrowningMomentOfFunny maybe the suit puts his HUD onto his phat specs.]]

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** At one point someone actually asked Marc Laidlaw himself about how Gordon has a HUD if he doesn't have the helmet on. Marc's response was that they didn't actually think about that, and that [[CrowningMomentOfFunny [[SugarWiki/FunnyMoments maybe the suit puts his HUD onto his phat specs.]]

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* The nazis dominated most of Europe within a few years. The Combine dominated the entire Earth within ''7 hours''.


** ... Which doesn't bar the fact that he may have had parents, aunts, uncles, siblings, cousins, grandparents, etc. All of which could be dead or not locatable. This is happening to EVERYBODY. Also in CivilProtection (made by Ross Scott, creator of Freeman's mind), it is mentioned that the language on the walls gives away where city 17 is at. They are someplace in Europe in a country that was former Soviet-Union. So... Where is everyone who speaks that country's native language and why does no one have accents? Only English speakers are in the city it seems, so where is everyone else...? - Tropers/{{Thecommander236}}

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** ... Which doesn't bar the fact that he may have had parents, aunts, uncles, siblings, cousins, grandparents, etc. All of which could be dead or not locatable. This is happening to EVERYBODY. Also in CivilProtection Machinima/CivilProtection (made by Ross Scott, creator of Freeman's mind), it is mentioned that the language on the walls gives away where city 17 is at. They are someplace in Europe in a country that was former Soviet-Union. So... Where is everyone who speaks that country's native language and why does no one have accents? Only English speakers are in the city it seems, so where is everyone else...? - Tropers/{{Thecommander236}}

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*** Also, they're only redshirts when they're up against a near-invincible time-traveling super-genius carrying an impossible arsenal of weapons. Lore-wise, they spend most of their time beating up Citizens and fighting the Resistance, and they seem somewhat effective in that regard considering how their crackdown during Route Kanal results in most of the Railroad dead either before you arrive or shortly after you leave. And during the Uprising, the Resistance have the advantage of numbers on their side.
**** But why do trans-human supersoldiers covered head-to-toe in Kevlar still die to a handful of pistol bullets, that seem to go right through their armor like it's nothing?
***** It seems like most of the guns in the game came from a Combine armory, since they're seen using the Pistol, SMG and Shotgun. They could have those guns loaded with an armor-piercing round, which would make this a case of HoistByHisOwnPetard. Other weapons from non-Combine sources like the .357 Magnum and the Crossbow could reasonably penetrate body armor on their own. (They shoot Magnum rounds and superheated rebar, respectively.)

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** You could take that logic a step further and say that the G-Man is responsible for all of the BenevolentArchitecture that we've learned to take for granted in games; every single door you need to go through being conveniently unlocked, for instance.

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* This one is about the "Epistle 3" plot summary that's been making the rounds. My first thought when seeing how it turned out was indignance- it's another cliffhanger, it doesn't resolve anything! But after thinking back about the history of the series, it actually makes sense why it would end that way. Half-Life 1 and 2 both ended with the G-Man putting Gordon in stasis, taking him out of the action so he doesn't know how things actually turned out. The Vortigaunts' intervention is the only reason he's able to stay in the Half-Life 2 setting for the Episodes. The fact that he stays in that setting for a direct continuation of the second game is why the episodes aren't called Half-Life ''3'' Episode whatever, despite taking place after 2. An ending to Episode 3 that took Gordon out of the conflict with the Combine would presumably lead to an actual Half-Life 3 which was about an entirely different conflict. That might even be why the series is called Half-Life: Gordon keeps leading "half-lives" as he fights different battles but never gets to actually finish things.


** They could be resistance members / they are off screen the entire time in Hl2.

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** They could be resistance members / they are off screen the entire time in Hl2.''VideoGame/HalfLife2''.



*** Well they did have to have the Antlion Larvae to boost their powers, that may be because she's not of a species even related to Vortigaunts (like the Gargantuan, Alien Controllers or Alien Grunts, but seeing as their powers involve creating and manipulating energy (it's electricity in [=HL1=], but this troper feels it looks that way due to their collars limiting their power and so the energy is more chaotic like lightning, as their attack in Hl2 is powerful enough to kill you at full HP), it makes sense that they'd be able to heal or resurrect their own and with the necessary tools people of other species.

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*** Well they did have to have the Antlion Larvae to boost their powers, that may be because she's not of a species even related to Vortigaunts (like the Gargantuan, Alien Controllers or Alien Grunts, but seeing as their powers involve creating and manipulating energy (it's electricity in [=HL1=], but this troper feels it looks that way due to their collars limiting their power and so the energy is more chaotic like lightning, as their attack in Hl2 ''VideoGame/HalfLife2'' is powerful enough to kill you at full HP), it makes sense that they'd be able to heal or resurrect their own and with the necessary tools people of other species.

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