Follow TV Tropes

Following

History Fridge / BreakingBad

Go To


Added DiffLines:

** This plot thread and all of the following speculation is addressed in its entirety in [[Film/ElCamino El Camino]].


* The scene where Huell and Kuby enter Ted Beneke's house. The audience knows that it relates to the money problems, but it is likely that Beneke himself doesn't realise that until they mention Skyler. Thus, when they initially walk in (without his consent) and Huell warns him to do what he's told and Kuby insists on getting Beneke's check book, Beneke probably thinks that a random, bizarre duo of thugs are trying to steal his (considerable) wealth. Which, when one thinks about that, makes an amusing scene even more amusing from the perspective of the audience and more terrifying from the perspective of Beneke.

to:

* The scene where Huell and Kuby enter Ted Beneke's house. The audience knows that it relates to the money problems, but it is likely that Beneke Ted himself doesn't realise realize that until they mention Skyler. Thus, when they initially walk in (without his consent) and Huell warns him to do what he's told and Kuby insists on getting Beneke's Ted's check book, Beneke Ted probably thinks that a random, bizarre duo of thugs are trying to steal his (considerable) wealth. Which, when one thinks about that, makes an amusing scene even more amusing from the perspective of the audience and more terrifying from Ted's POV.
* As unexpected as some of
the perspective plots are, they do sort of Beneke.
play out in a very realistic way, especially in regards to white privilege. One example of this is seen in Todd threatening Jesse's Latina girlfriend as opposed to Jesse's biological and white family in the burbs. The horrifying reality of POC being expendable and killed without justice is a certainty you can bet on, and the deaths of Jesse's family would warrant unwanted attention from the police.


Added DiffLines:

** Waltís speech in the school gym might reflect this. We never get an answer for why Walt gives an impromptu speech he memorized a mountain of air crash statistics for. However, notice how desperate he is to downplay the death toll and how much heís stumbling over his words during it. While Walt can turn on the empathy trigger statements regarding it if need be and is shellshocked by the actual carnage itself, nothing about him ever remotely implies he would care nearly as much about it as he does, certainly not to the point of researching its ranks in the list of air disasters. The most logical explanation is that he looked it up trying to reassure himself that he didnít do something too horrible, hence his repeated insistence in the speech about how it could have been worse and there are so many worse ones. Heís just trying to ease his guilt over the massacre.


* Perhaps borders on FridgeHorror, but the show was essentially about turning Mr. Chips into Scarface. As Walt's actions gradually get worse and worse, he keeps giving rationales for said actions. Since Walt started as an EscapistCharacter, the audience probably is too. However, at one point in the series, Walt will cross a line that you would be unwilling to cross. Since the viewer is (presumably) as normal as Walt would be in the beginning, we get to see how far we'd be willing to go to break bad, when we finally see him do an action we would be unwilling to do.

to:

* Perhaps borders on FridgeHorror, but the show was essentially about turning Mr. Chips into Scarface. As Walt's actions gradually get worse and worse, he keeps giving rationales for said actions. Since Walt started as an EscapistCharacter, the audience probably is too. However, at one point in the series, Walt probably will cross a line that you would be unwilling to cross. Since the viewer is (presumably) as normal as Walt would be in the beginning, we get to see how far we'd be willing to go to break bad, when we finally see him do an action we would be unwilling to do.

Added DiffLines:

** Swing and a miss. The scene also includes Jesse spiking said lock in rage because they removed it.


* Heisenberg actually ends up being something of an accidental hero: his actions end up with the collapse of not 1, not 2, but 4 major crime syndicates: The Cartel, Pollos Hermanos, the Arizona Neo-Nazis, and the Blue Sky cook. He arguably did more for the War on Drugs than the DEA, in universe.

to:

* Heisenberg actually ends up being something of an accidental hero: his actions end up with the collapse of not 1, not 2, but 4 major crime syndicates: The Cartel, Pollos Hermanos, the Arizona Neo-Nazis, and the Blue Sky cook. He arguably did more for the War on Drugs than the DEA, in universe. Not only that, but also more impact on gangs in general than the FBI by taking out an entire stateís worth of non-imprisoned Nazis.


* Gus's death has some chilling undertones to it. Like, Walt is lucky the bomb only killed Gus, Hector, and Tyrus. 'Cause watching the explosion, the force of the blast blew down the door and threw it into the hallway. If a caregiver was wheeling a resident down the hall in front of Hector's door at the time of explosion. Or maybe a caregiver came to Hector's door to check on him at the time of the explosion. Anyone in that vicinity would have had a bad day.

to:

* Gus's death has some chilling undertones to it. Like, Walt is lucky the bomb only killed Gus, Hector, and Tyrus. 'Cause Because watching the explosion, the force of the blast blew down the door and threw it into the hallway. If a caregiver was wheeling a resident down the hall in front of Hector's door at the time of explosion. Or maybe a caregiver came to Hector's door to check on him at the time of the explosion. Anyone in that vicinity would have had a bad day.



to:

* The scene where Huell and Kuby enter Ted Beneke's house. The audience knows that it relates to the money problems, but it is likely that Beneke himself doesn't realise that until they mention Skyler. Thus, when they initially walk in (without his consent) and Huell warns him to do what he's told and Kuby insists on getting Beneke's check book, Beneke probably thinks that a random, bizarre duo of thugs are trying to steal his (considerable) wealth. Which, when one thinks about that, makes an amusing scene even more amusing from the perspective of the audience and more terrifying from the perspective of Beneke.


* What does Walt build to use against the Neo-Nazis in the finale? A robot, which is a reference to a previous line.

to:

* What does Walt build to use against the Neo-Nazis in the finale? A robot, which is a reference to a previous line.line in "4 Days Out".


Added DiffLines:

** It's also the fact that ''Mike is threatening him''. While the two probably wouldn't call each other friends, they've worked together on-and-off since 2002 and are genuinely willing to stick their neck out for each other; see also Mike saving Jimmy's life in the desert with his sniper rifle, then trying to comfort him when he's traumatized (insofar as Mike is capable of comforting someone). The fact that Mike is threatening to hurt him just to get to Walt is when Saul realized that Walt fucked up beyond repair and the only options were to go along with Walt's plan to get Mike away or sell out a client, which he [[EvenEvilHasStandards will never do no matter what]].




to:

\n* How is Saul able to accurately predict Walt that he'll end up managing a Cinnabon in Omaha? For starters, the owner of that particular Cinnabon is in the game. The real Gene Takavic was a guy so far in over his head in gambling debts he could never pay off, and was killed for it. But: Takavic had no one, no friends, no family, no one to find it unusual that he's been missing for so long. He made his money remotely, or maybe living off some kind of windfall - the point is, the authorities have no reason to believe he is dead. So when the real Gene is killed, the identity is kept alive in the record books to sell to people like the vacuum guy. And when vacuum guy needs to set up a new life for a client, people like the owner of the Cinnabon can, for a price, provide the client a landing spot. Saul must have paid extra to make sure that he'd end up in a solid landing place, not a free-but-uncertain future like Jesse Pinkman's. And when Saul opts to disappear, he watches a few Cinnabon training videos, the owner fires or reassigns the current manager, then brings in Saul, introducing him to the rest of the crew. Nothing suspicious.



** In ''Better Call Saul'', Mike and Nacho had a similar scheme to get Tuco locked up. It backfired in a big way as Mike found himself at the other Salamancas' mercy, though it incidentally also led to him meeting and working with Gus. After the blowback from that scheme, it makes sense that Mike would be hesitant to do another "get someone incarcerated" job and see it as a half-measure.

to:

** In ''Better Call Saul'', Mike and Nacho Gus had a similar scheme to get Tuco Lalo locked up. It backfired in a big way as Mike found himself at the other Salamancas' mercy, though it incidentally also led Lalo was still able to him meeting give orders and working with Gus.harm Gus's operation from jail. After the blowback from that scheme, it makes sense that Mike would be hesitant to do another "get someone incarcerated" job and see it as a half-measure.


* Someone once pointed out that for a hardened drug kingpin who kills a lot of people, Walt begs for his life and pleads a lot. Nearly pissing his pants many times, he's as scared or worse than someone like Jesse half the time. But that element of Walt makes more sense when you consider he's ''not'' a hardened drug kingpin. As mentioned with the ''Scarface'' example above, Walt constantly acts like someone who got his ideals from TV shows and movies. The fact that he acts this way when trapped in a corner may have been intentional to drive home a simple point: Walt was never really meant to be a drug dealer, much less a kingpin. He just never "got it" and that's why everything was constantly falling apart for him. In fact, for all his faults in the emotional department, Jesse actually understood what their role was in the big picture. It was Jesse who warned against doing business with Tuco, Jesse who was against expanding into new territory (which got Combo killed), Jesse who was against meeting in the middle of nowhere, Jesse who was against continuing the operation after being offered a buyout, etc.
** In fact, it's hard to be a successful, hardened "bad guy" when you're a family man on the side. Too much collateral, as Tuco put it. Just compare Walt to the other "successful" bad guys in both this show and ''Better Call Saul''. The closest thing any of them has to a family would be Mike with his daughter-in-law and granddaughter, and Gus's kids (assuming they even are real). ''Better Call Saul'' also showed how having family complicates things -- as evident from when the Cousins threaten Mike by standing on a rooftop overlooking the swimming pool and doing a gun gesture at Kaylee. Walt only survived as long as he did through sheer luck and by outsmarting people on the technical/mechanical side of things, not because he actually understood the drug game. This lack of understanding of the drug game also means that even at his peak, Walt would never be able to create a meth empire akin to Gus', as that takes a lifetime of patience, creating connections, and establishing a chain of command.
** It also ties in with the theme of the whole show: Walt is a genius but an amateur. One day he is making brilliant moves, the next he looks like a complete idiot (expanding his territory in S2 in a way that got Combo killed, etc). In fact, it explains his and Mike's conflicts. Walt is much smarter, but Mike is savvier. Mike catches Walt going to Gus's house, trying to sneak into the warehouse, etc. All amateur moves. But Walt outthinks them with tactics like his orchestration of Gale's murder, or having Hector be a fake snitch (which was helped by Mike being out of commission).

to:

* Someone once pointed out that for For a hardened drug kingpin who kills a lot of people, Walt begs for his life and pleads a lot. Nearly pissing his pants many times, he's as scared or worse than someone like Jesse half the time. But that element of Walt makes more sense when you consider he's ''not'' a hardened drug kingpin. As mentioned with the ''Scarface'' example above, Walt constantly acts like someone who got his ideals from TV shows and movies. The fact that he acts this way when trapped in a corner may have been intentional to drive home a simple point: point Krazy 8 mentioned: Walt was never really meant to be a drug dealer, much less a kingpin. He just never "got it" and that's why everything was constantly falling apart for him. In fact, for all his faults in the emotional department, Jesse actually understood what their role was in the big picture.underworld. It was Jesse who warned against doing business with Tuco, Jesse who was against expanding into new territory (which got Combo killed), Jesse who was against meeting in the middle of nowhere, Jesse who was against continuing the operation after being offered a buyout, etc.
** In fact, it's hard to be a successful, hardened "bad guy" when you're a family man on the side. Too much collateral, as Tuco put it. Just compare Walt to the other "successful" bad guys in both this show and ''Better Call Saul''. The closest thing any of them has to a family would be Mike with his daughter-in-law and granddaughter, and Gus's kids (assuming they even are real). granddaughter. ''Better Call Saul'' also showed how having family complicates things -- as evident from when the Cousins threaten Mike by standing on a rooftop overlooking the swimming pool things, both with Mike's family and doing a gun gesture at Kaylee.with Nacho's father. Walt only survived as long as he did through sheer luck and by outsmarting people on the technical/mechanical side of things, not because he actually understood the drug game. This lack of understanding of the drug game also means that even at his peak, Walt would never be able to create a meth empire akin to Gus', as that takes a lifetime of patience, creating connections, and establishing a chain of command.
** It also ties in with the theme of the whole show: Walt is a genius but an amateur. One day he is making brilliant moves, the next he looks like a complete idiot (expanding his territory in S2 Season 2 in a way that got Combo killed, etc). In fact, it explains his and Mike's conflicts. Walt is much smarter, but Mike is savvier. Mike catches Walt going to Gus's house, trying to sneak into the warehouse, etc. All amateur moves. But Walt outthinks them with tactics like his orchestration of Gale's murder, or having Hector be a fake snitch (which was helped by Mike being out of commission).



* In Season 3 Saul strongly pushed laser tag--that is, a game in which lasers serve as fake guns--as the best way for the Whites to launder their drug money. How does Walter finally manage to launder his remaining money to his family? By having lasers pointed at the Schwartzes under the pretense that they have guns attached to them.
* Skyler is very similar to Walt regarding biting more than she can chew. When she decides to carry the task of laundering Walt's money by using the car wash instead of the Laser Tag business Saul offered. While is less suspicious to go with the car wash and her managing the business, it is much more less effective in actually covering Walt since is easier to relate the wash to him rather than have someone else appointed to manage the laser tag and having to do actual police tier digging to realize Walt owns it, not to mention that a Laser Tag business is much cheaper to kick start than buying an already existing Car Wash so is easier to explain, and if something goes bad Skyler is tying herself and the rest of the family with the money laundering operation. Skyler is just as an amateur compared to the pros as Walt is.

to:

* In Season 3 Saul strongly pushed laser tag--that is, a game in which lasers serve as fake guns--as the best way for the Whites to launder their drug money. How does Walter finally manage to launder his remaining money to his family? By having Badger and Skinny Pete point lasers pointed at the Schwartzes under the pretense that they have guns attached to them.
are fictional snipers.
* Skyler is very similar to Walt regarding biting more than she can chew. When she decides to carry the task of laundering Walt's money by using the car wash instead of the Laser Tag business Saul offered. While is it's less suspicious to go with the car wash and her managing the business, it is much more less effective in actually covering Walt since is easier to relate the wash to him rather than have someone else appointed to manage the laser tag and having to do actual police tier digging to realize Walt owns it, not to mention that a Laser Tag business is much cheaper to kick start than buying an already existing Car Wash so is easier to explain, and if something goes bad Skyler is tying herself and the rest of the family with the money laundering operation. Skyler is just as an amateur compared to the pros as Walt is.



* Watch the scene where Saul meets with Jesse's parents and their lawyer to negotiate repurchasing Jesse's house on behalf of his client. Now rewatch this scene after watching ''Better Call Saul'', and suddenly Saul's disdain for the Pinkmans' lawyer seems more like it's due to the lawyer embodying everything Saul / Jimmy hated about Chuck. Hell, Mr. Gardner's reaction of "What is this, a joke?" you see a look on Saul's face that almost makes it seem like he's recalling Chuck saying similar words.


to:

* Watch the scene where Saul meets with Jesse's parents and their lawyer to negotiate repurchasing Jesse's house on behalf of his client. Now rewatch this scene after watching ''Better Call Saul'', and suddenly Saul's disdain for the Pinkmans' lawyer seems more like it's due to the lawyer embodying everything Saul / Jimmy hated about Chuck. Hell, Mr. Gardner's reaction of "What is this, a joke?" you see a look on Saul's face that almost makes it seem like he's recalling Chuck saying similar words.

Chuck's breakdown in "Chicanery" ("And he gets to be a lawyer? What a sick joke!").
**You can even tell he was triggered a bit after that. They way he drops his head for a bit, and lowers his voice as he goes in for the kill. He can probably still remember that day clearly.



* Watch the scene where Saul meets with Jesse's parents and their lawyer to negotiate repurchasing Jesse's house on behalf of his client. Now rewatch this scene after watching ''Better Call Saul'', and suddenly Saul's disdain for the Pinkmans' lawyer seems more like it's due to the lawyer embodying everything Saul / Jimmy hated about Chuck.


to:

* Watch the scene where Saul meets with Jesse's parents and their lawyer to negotiate repurchasing Jesse's house on behalf of his client. Now rewatch this scene after watching ''Better Call Saul'', and suddenly Saul's disdain for the Pinkmans' lawyer seems more like it's due to the lawyer embodying everything Saul / Jimmy hated about Chuck. Hell, Mr. Gardner's reaction of "What is this, a joke?" you see a look on Saul's face that almost makes it seem like he's recalling Chuck saying similar words.



* Gus doesn't look concerned when he learns that Hank is installing a tracker on his car and tells Walt to "Do it". He's not concerned because, as season 3 of ''Series/BetterCallSaul'' shows, he used trackers to monitor Mike before recruiting him into his business. Gus knows, therefore, the tricks you can use to throw off a tracker when you need to do shady business.

to:

* Gus doesn't look concerned when he learns that Hank is installing a tracker on his car and tells Walt to "Do it". He's not concerned because, as season seasons 3 and 4 of ''Series/BetterCallSaul'' shows, he used trackers to monitor Mike before recruiting him into his business. Gus knows, therefore, the tricks you can use to throw off a tracker when you need to do shady business.




to:

* Watch the scene where Saul meets with Jesse's parents and their lawyer to negotiate repurchasing Jesse's house on behalf of his client. Now rewatch this scene after watching ''Better Call Saul'', and suddenly Saul's disdain for the Pinkmans' lawyer seems more like it's due to the lawyer embodying everything Saul / Jimmy hated about Chuck.



*** And as far as he's concerned, even for that moment while he was getting an identity change, he's not Saul anymore. He's just Jimmy.

to:

*** And as far as he's concerned, even for that moment while he was getting an identity change, he's not Saul anymore. He's just Jimmy.Jimmy.
*** Not to mention he had extensive business with Skyler as well, not just Walt. Saul could be worried that Skyler might throw him under the bus with everything she knows he's done to aid in Walt's business to get a more favorable deal for herself (whether or not she would is a different discussion).

Showing 15 edit(s) of 219

Top

How well does it match the trope?

Example of:

/

Media sources:

/

Report