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--> '''Dr. Wilbur''': Vanessa, what's the matter?
--> '''Sybil''' (weeping): I'm not Vanessa!
--> '''Dr. Wilbur''': Oh, I'm sorry, Peggy, but you popped out so fast!

to:

--> -> '''Dr. Wilbur''': Vanessa, what's the matter?
--> -> '''Sybil''' (weeping): I'm not Vanessa!
--> -> '''Dr. Wilbur''': Oh, I'm sorry, Peggy, but you popped out so fast!


TropeCodifier for the SplitPersonality trope, and allegedly {{Based on a True Story}}, although according to some accounts and specifically the book ''[[http://www.amazon.com/Sybil-Exposed-Extraordinary-Multiple-Personality/dp/1439168288/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1364517015&sr=8-1&keywords=sybil+exposed Sybil Exposed]]'', may in fact be {{Based On A Great Big Lie}}, or at least on some extremely sketchy therapeutic practices.

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TropeCodifier for the SplitPersonality trope, and allegedly {{Based on a True Story}}, although according to some accounts and specifically the book ''[[http://www.amazon.com/Sybil-Exposed-Extraordinary-Multiple-Personality/dp/1439168288/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1364517015&sr=8-1&keywords=sybil+exposed Sybil Exposed]]'', may in fact be {{Based On A Great Big Lie}}, or at least on some extremely sketchy therapeutic practices.
practices. However, Dr. Philip Coons, who's studied multiple personality for many years, concluded Sybil was really multiple. Another doctor who worked closely with and believed her was Dr. Patrick Suraci.

Sybil's real name was Shirley Ardell Mason. She was an art teacher and toy designer, a member of the Seventh Day Adventist Church and endeared member of the Lexington, Kentucky community. She was in touch with cousins including life-coach and inspirational speaker [[http://www.naomirhode.com/ Naomi Rhode]], who confirmed her story. Her real life is memorialized and cherished in ''[[http://www.sybilsfriend.com/ After Sybil]]'', by her student and friend Nancy Preston.



* '''[[RedOniBlueOni Peggy Lou and Peggy Ann Baldwin]]''': Two similar personalities. Peggy Lou is the angry little girl who breaks glass and fights Sybil's battles; Peggy Ann is a less aggressive and more tactful version of Peggy Lou. (The two merge early in the integration process to become a single person called Peggy Louisiana.)

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* '''[[RedOniBlueOni Peggy Lou and Peggy Ann Baldwin]]''': Two similar personalities. Peggy Lou is the angry little girl who breaks glass and fights Sybil's battles; Peggy Ann is a less aggressive and more tactful version of Peggy Lou. (The two merge early in the [[SplitPersonalityMerge integration process process]] to become a single person called Peggy Louisiana.)



* VeryLooselyBasedOnATrueStory: Even Wilbur and Schreiber admitted that many years of therapy had to be condensed, locations and names were changed for privacy, and many significant incidents were omitted for the sake of creating a more cohesive work. Schreiber in particular claimed that the abuse detailed in the story was not even half of what Sybil had actually suffered. More recent criticism holds that significantly more of the story was exaggerated, if not outright fabricated.
** Schreiber stated very early in Sybil's therapy that while she believed a book about the case could be a bestseller, she could not guarantee that such a downer story could be sold without a "happy ending". Wilbur assured Schreiber that if she would agree to write the book, Wilbur would see to the happy ending. [[ContrivedCoincidence And indeed, all Sybil's personalities were integrated just in time for Schreiber's final deadline.]]

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* VeryLooselyBasedOnATrueStory: Even Wilbur and Dr. Wilbur, Flora Schreiber and Shirley Mason herself/ves admitted that many years of therapy had to be condensed, locations and names were changed for privacy, and many significant incidents were omitted for the sake of creating a more cohesive work. Schreiber in particular claimed that the abuse detailed in the story was not even half of what Sybil the real Shirley Mason had actually suffered. More recent criticism holds that significantly more of the story was exaggerated, if not outright fabricated.
fabricated; however, the research supposedly proving the story to be fake is itself questionable.
** Schreiber stated very early in Sybil's Mason's therapy that while she believed a book about the case could be a bestseller, she could not guarantee that such a downer story could be sold without a "happy ending". Wilbur assured Schreiber that if she would agree to write the book, Wilbur would see to the happy ending. [[ContrivedCoincidence And indeed, all Sybil's personalities were integrated just in time for Schreiber's final deadline.]]

Added DiffLines:

** As a matter of fact, the real Sybil was so disheartened at the loss of her people, whom she'd come to regard as sisters, that she called them back. Some doctors now admit that forced integrations often end up this way.


* ParentWithANewParamour: It's kind of a sidenote in the face of everything else impacting her, but Sybil must also deal with her father's new wife, who doesn't know how to deal with her new adult stepdaughter's mental issues.

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* ParentWithANewParamour: ParentWithNewParamour: It's kind of a sidenote in the face of everything else impacting her, but Sybil must also deal with her father's new wife, who doesn't know how to deal with her new adult stepdaughter's mental issues.

Added DiffLines:

* ParentWithANewParamour: It's kind of a sidenote in the face of everything else impacting her, but Sybil must also deal with her father's new wife, who doesn't know how to deal with her new adult stepdaughter's mental issues.


* AdaptedOut: Sybil's seventeenth personality, the Blonde, who in the book appears only briefly at the very end of therapy. She isn't mentioned in either the 1976 or the 2007 adaptation. In fact, all media surrounding the case--including the book in which she appears--stress that Sybil had only ''sixteen'' personalities including her own.

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* AdaptedOut: Sybil's seventeenth personality, the Blonde, who in the book appears only briefly at the very end of therapy. She isn't mentioned in either the 1976 or the 2007 adaptation. In fact, all media surrounding the case--including the book in which she appears--stress that Sybil had only ''sixteen'' personalities including her own.[[note]]By the time the Blonde emerged, the Peggys had been merged into a single personality, so technically it might be said that Sybil never had ''more'' than sixteen personalities at one time. It's a pretty titchy technicality, though.[[/note]]


* ColorCodedForYourConvenience: In-universe. Sybil and her various personalities exhibit strong panic reactions to the colors "purple" and "green," which both link back to particularly traumatic experiences in her childhood.

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* ColorCodedForYourConvenience: In-universe. Sybil and her various personalities exhibit strong panic reactions to the connect colors "purple" and "green," to various emotions, many of which both have connections to specific incidents of abuse.
** Sybil and many of the selves
link back to particularly traumatic experiences anxiety and fear with green, the color of the kitchen where much of their abuse took place.
** Peggy describes anger as purple after an incident
in which she was locked in a wheat bin and nearly suffocated. As the air ran out, Peggy scribbled on the inside of the bin with her childhood.purple crayon so that someone would know she had been there.
** Sybil creates a painting entitled "Blue Is the Color of Love" containing all the shades of blue she associates with love.[[note]]Due to a labeling error, the reproduction of this painting in the original book is ''not'' "Blue Is the Color of Love."[[/note]]



* DrivenToSuicide: Sybil attempts this at least twice.

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* DrivenToSuicide: Sybil Marcia suffers from depression and attempts this at least twice.suicide (which would naturally kill Sybil as well). Sybil herself also attempts suicide.


Added DiffLines:

** Marcia wraps herself in a veil, recites some morbid poetry, and scatters flower petals while in the grip of suicidal depression.


Ever since childhood, Sybil Dorsett (Field) has suffered from periodic blackouts from which she emerges hours, days, or even years later with no memory of the intervening time. Throughout her life, Sybil has struggled to control these strange episodes while keeping them hidden from others, leading her to isolate herself from any potential relationships for fear they will learn her terrible secret. Now in her thirties, she is a [[EmotionlessGirl shy, quiet]],[[NerdGlasses bespectacled]] young student teacher who lives in near-complete seclusion. But after a terrifying incident in which she "came to" lost in a strange city in a deadly snowstorm, she finally decides to seek out help.

to:

Ever since childhood, Sybil Dorsett (Field) has suffered from periodic blackouts from which she emerges hours, days, or even years later with no memory of the intervening time. Throughout her life, Sybil has struggled to control these strange episodes while keeping them hidden from others, leading her to isolate herself from any potential relationships for fear they will learn her terrible secret. Now in her thirties, she is a [[EmotionlessGirl shy, quiet]],[[NerdGlasses quiet]], [[NerdGlasses bespectacled]] young student teacher who lives in near-complete seclusion. But after a terrifying incident in which she "came to" lost in a strange city in a deadly snowstorm, she finally decides to seek out help.



* AdaptedOut: Sybil's seventeenth personality, the Blonde, who in the book appears only briefly at the very end of therapy. She isn't mentioned in either the 1976 or the 2007 adaptation. In fact, all media surrounding the case--including the book in which she appears--stress that Sybil had only ''sixteen'' personalities (including her own).

to:

* AdaptedOut: Sybil's seventeenth personality, the Blonde, who in the book appears only briefly at the very end of therapy. She isn't mentioned in either the 1976 or the 2007 adaptation. In fact, all media surrounding the case--including the book in which she appears--stress that Sybil had only ''sixteen'' personalities (including including her own).own.


Ever since childhood, Sybil Dorsett (Field) has suffered from periodic blackouts, from which she emerges hours, days, or even years with no memory of the intervening time. Throughout her life, Sybil has struggled to control these strange episodes while keeping them hidden from others, leading her to isolate herself from any potential relationships for fear they will learn her terrible secret. Now in her thirties, she is a [[EmotionlessGirl shy, quiet]],[[NerdGlasses bespectacled]] young student teacher who lives in near-complete seclusion. But after a terrifying incident in which she "came to" lost in a strange city in a deadly snowstorm, she finally decides to seek out help.

to:

Ever since childhood, Sybil Dorsett (Field) has suffered from periodic blackouts, blackouts from which she emerges hours, days, or even years later with no memory of the intervening time. Throughout her life, Sybil has struggled to control these strange episodes while keeping them hidden from others, leading her to isolate herself from any potential relationships for fear they will learn her terrible secret. Now in her thirties, she is a [[EmotionlessGirl shy, quiet]],[[NerdGlasses bespectacled]] young student teacher who lives in near-complete seclusion. But after a terrifying incident in which she "came to" lost in a strange city in a deadly snowstorm, she finally decides to seek out help.


Sybil Dorsett (Field) is a [[EmotionlessGirl shy, quiet]], [[NerdGlasses bespectacled]] young woman who keeps losing time. As Dr. Cornelia Wilbur (Woodward), her compassionate therapist, probes her subconscious via hypnotism and talk therapy with her seeming [[MindHive legion]] of alternate personalities, highly disturbing details of Sybil's past begin to emerge, many of them focused on her {{Ax Crazy}} mother, who subjected her to unspeakable abuse, resulting in the fragmentation of Sybil's personality. The two women develop a powerful (and possibly medically unethical) bond as they journey to the heart of Sybil's dark past.

to:

Ever since childhood, Sybil Dorsett (Field) has suffered from periodic blackouts, from which she emerges hours, days, or even years with no memory of the intervening time. Throughout her life, Sybil has struggled to control these strange episodes while keeping them hidden from others, leading her to isolate herself from any potential relationships for fear they will learn her terrible secret. Now in her thirties, she is a [[EmotionlessGirl shy, quiet]], [[NerdGlasses quiet]],[[NerdGlasses bespectacled]] young woman student teacher who keeps losing time. As lives in near-complete seclusion. But after a terrifying incident in which she "came to" lost in a strange city in a deadly snowstorm, she finally decides to seek out help.

Dr. Cornelia Wilbur (Woodward), her compassionate therapist, probes her Sybil's subconscious via hypnotism and talk therapy with therapy, only to discover that her seeming mild-mannered new client is host to a [[MindHive legion]] of alternate personalities, highly more than any other case previously recorded. These personalities range from precocious, self-assured Victoria to fearful, furious Peggy to suicidal, self-loathing Marcia, as well as a [[GrannyClassic little old lady]], a [[TheVoiceless pre-verbal infant]], and a pair of rambunctious boys.

Wilbur is forced to give up standard technique and rely on her instincts to guide her through what quickly becomes an unprecedented case. The story becomes a psychological "whodunnit" as Wilbur investigates Sybil's forgotten past, eventually unearthing
disturbing details and the stunning revelation of Sybil's past begin to emerge, many of them focused hideous physical, mental, and sexual torture inflicted on young Sybil by her {{Ax Crazy}} mother, who subjected her to unspeakable abuse, resulting in dangerously schizophrenic mother. Along the fragmentation of Sybil's personality. The two women way, doctor and patient develop a powerful (and possibly medically unethical) bond as they journey bond, which eventually allows Sybil to the heart of Sybil's dark past.
regain her memory and absorb her lost personalities.



* AdaptedOut: Sybil's seventeenth personality, the Blonde. She does not appear in either the 1976 or the 2007 adaptation, and it's significant that all the media surrounding the case emphasizes that Sybil had ''sixteen'' personalities.

to:

* AdaptedOut: Sybil's seventeenth personality, the Blonde. Blonde, who in the book appears only briefly at the very end of therapy. She does not appear isn't mentioned in either the 1976 or the 2007 adaptation, and it's significant that adaptation. In fact, all the media surrounding the case emphasizes case--including the book in which she appears--stress that Sybil had only ''sixteen'' personalities.personalities (including her own).

Added DiffLines:

* AllPsychologyIsFreudian: Played Straight and Deconstructed. Wilbur is a classically trained Freudian psychoanalyst who originally attempts to treat Sybil by psychoanalyzing each personality individually. When she realizes how unusual the case is, she is forced to modify her techniques. Yet many of Sybil's (and Hattie's) neuroses are described in classical Freudian terms (Sybil, for example, "displaces" her frustration at being unable to escape her mother's torture into Peggy's need to break glass, which functions as both a pressure release and a symbolic escape. When the root of the frustration is addressed, the glass-breaking behavior stops.)

Added DiffLines:

* AdaptedOut: Sybil's seventeenth personality, the Blonde. She does not appear in either the 1976 or the 2007 adaptation, and it's significant that all the media surrounding the case emphasizes that Sybil had ''sixteen'' personalities.


Added DiffLines:

* CompositeCharacter: Peggy Lou and Peggy Ann are compressed into a single Peggy for the 1976 film. Likely this was done to avoid the confusion of having two characters with similar names and personalities, but compressing the two Peggys to one means that Sybil would appear to have only 15 personalities, even though the movie repeatedly states that she has sixteen.


* FromTheMouthsOfBabes: One of the children in Sybil's kindergarten class, interacting with the Vanessa personality, corrects his father when he addresses "Sybil":

to:

* FromTheMouthsOfBabes: One of the children in Sybil's kindergarten class, Richard's young son, interacting with the Vanessa personality, corrects his father when he addresses "Sybil":


* '''[[IronWoobie Marcia Lynn Baldwin]]''': A dark, brooding, suicidal personality who believes she deserves to die because [[ElectraComplex she wished Sybil's mother dead]]. Is best friends with Vanessa and enjoys writing and drawing.
* '''[[TheOneGuy Sid and Mike Dorsett]]''': Two male personalities. Sid (who takes his name from Sybil's initials) is a quiet, sensitive boy who identifies with Sybil's father, while Mike is a more assertive young man. Both boys enjoy carpentry and sports, and both suffer under the belief that one day they will develop penises when they grow up. Both were originally created to deal with Sybil's belief that her abused female body was [[DefiledForever dirty]].

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* '''[[IronWoobie '''[[TheOphelia Marcia Lynn Baldwin]]''': A dark, brooding, suicidal personality who believes she deserves to die because [[ElectraComplex she wished Sybil's mother dead]]. Is best friends with Vanessa and enjoys writing and drawing.
* '''[[TheOneGuy Sid and Mike Dorsett]]''': Two male personalities. Sid (who takes his name from Sybil's initials) is a quiet, sensitive boy who identifies with Sybil's father, while Mike is a more assertive young man. Both boys enjoy carpentry and sports, and both suffer under the belief that one day they will develop grow penises when they grow up. Both were originally created to deal with Sybil's belief that her abused female body was [[DefiledForever dirty]].



* FishOutOfTemporalWater: Many of the selves, but especially Peggy Ann, believe that they are still children and have no knowledge of the intervening years since they left home.
* FistOfRage: The Peggy personality, when [[spoiler:Sybil is attempting to reintegrate with her]].

to:

* FishOutOfTemporalWater: Many of the selves, but especially Peggy Ann, the Peggys, believe that they are still children and have no knowledge of the intervening years since they left home.
* FistOfRage: The Peggy personality, when [[spoiler:Sybil is attempting to reintegrate with her]].Lou expresses her feelings of entrapment and rage by punching windows.


* '''[[RedOniBlueOni Peggy Lou and Peggy Ann Baldwin]]''': Two similar personalities. Peggy Lou is the angry little girl who breaks glass and fights Sybil's battles; Peggy Ann is a less aggressive and more tactful version of Peggy Lou.

to:

* '''[[RedOniBlueOni Peggy Lou and Peggy Ann Baldwin]]''': Two similar personalities. Peggy Lou is the angry little girl who breaks glass and fights Sybil's battles; Peggy Ann is a less aggressive and more tactful version of Peggy Lou. (The two merge early in the integration process to become a single person called Peggy Louisiana.)

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