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* AdaptationalVillainy:
** This version of Scrooge comes across as a great deal colder than the original. Rather than being indifferent he seems to find the suffering of others darkly amusing. He also makes more efforts to defend himself from the spirits than in most versions. All in all he is a great deal grouchier and more like his past self throughout nearly his entire time with the Spirits than in the book, where his transformation begins almost immediately on being transported back to the first vision of Christmas Past.
** Scrooge's father also gets this. As in the book, Fan tells young Scrooge that their father has changed and wishes him home. When Scrooge meets him, however, he's still cold and dismissive of his son and only sees him for three days before making him work at Fezziwig's.



* AdaptationalVillainy:
** This version of Scrooge comes across as a great deal colder than the original. Rather than being indifferent he seems to find the suffering of others darkly amusing. He also makes more efforts to defend himself from the spirits than in most versions. All in all he is a great deal grouchier and more like his past self throughout nearly his entire time with the Spirits than in the book, where his transformation begins almost immediately on being transported back to the first vision of Christmas Past.
** Scrooge's father also gets this. As in the book, Fan tells young Scrooge that their father has changed and wishes him home. When Scrooge meets him, however, he's still cold and dismissive of his son and only sees him for three days before making him work at Fezziwig's.


* JerkassHasAPoint: Scrooge dismissed Christmas as "a false, commercial enterprise." He said this in the 1800's. Considering what it's turned into today, he's pretty accurate.

to:

* JerkassHasAPoint: Scrooge dismissed Christmas as "a false, commercial enterprise." He said this in the 1800's.1800's, before Christmas was particularly commercialized. Considering what it's turned into today, he's pretty accurate.


* HappilyMarried: Belle marries a kindhearted man and has many children.

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* HappilyMarried: After leaving Scrooge, Belle marries a kindhearted man and has many children.children. Bob and Mrs. Cratchit, Fred and his wife, and Mr. and Mrs. Fezziwig are also examples.


** This version of Scrooge comes across as a great deal colder than the original. Rather than being indifferent he seems to find the suffering of others darkly amusing. He also makes more efforts to defend himself from the spirits than in most versions.

to:

** This version of Scrooge comes across as a great deal colder than the original. Rather than being indifferent he seems to find the suffering of others darkly amusing. He also makes more efforts to defend himself from the spirits than in most versions. All in all he is a great deal grouchier and more like his past self throughout nearly his entire time with the Spirits than in the book, where his transformation begins almost immediately on being transported back to the first vision of Christmas Past.


Creator/DavidWarner, who spent most of his career playing villains and psychos, has a major PlayingAgainstType moment as gentle, kindly Bob Cratchit. Creator/EdwardWoodward goes from avuncular to terrifying as the Ghost of Christmas Present. Roger Rees plays Fred. A young Joanne Whalley appears in one scene as Scrooge's sister Fan, and Frank Finlay appears as Jacob Marley.

to:

Creator/DavidWarner, who spent most of his career playing villains and psychos, has a major PlayingAgainstType moment as gentle, kindly Bob Cratchit. Creator/EdwardWoodward goes from avuncular to terrifying as the Ghost of Christmas Present. Roger Rees plays Fred. A young Joanne Whalley appears in one scene as Scrooge's sister Fan, and Frank Finlay appears as Jacob Marley.
Marley. Creator/MichaelGough is one of the businessmen soliciting for the poor.

Added DiffLines:

* AgeLift: Fan was Scrooge's younger sister in the book, but his older sister here.

Added DiffLines:

* SharpDressedMan: Unlike many other adaptations of ''A Christmas Carol'' (and the original book itself), Scrooge doesn't wear a nightshirt and nightcap during his journeys with the ghosts -- he just puts on a dressing gown and slippers over the shirt, waistcoat and trousers he wore during the day.


* MaternalDeathBlameTheChild: In this version, the reason why Scrooge's father has essentially abandoned his son at boarding school, as Scrooge tells the Ghost of Christmas Past.

to:

* MaternalDeathBlameTheChild: In this version, the reason why Scrooge's father has essentially abandoned his son at boarding school, as Scrooge tells the Ghost of Christmas Past. (This required making Fan his older sister, when Dickens states specifically that Fan is younger than Ebeneezer.)

Added DiffLines:

* SuddenlyShouting: After being shown a homeless family, with the father making the grim resolution to [[AFateWorseThanDeath go to the workhouse]] and his wife insisting that they remain together even without a place to live, Scrooge asks why he was shown this and what these people could possibly have to do with him.
-->'''Christmas Present:''' ''ARE THEY NOT OF THE HUMAN RACE?''


* ThemeTuneCameo: ''God Bless Us Everyone'' is among the various songs the ChristmasCarolers sing. Perhaps it's simply SuspiciouslyAproposMusic in-universe.

to:

* ThemeTuneCameo: ''God Bless Us Everyone'' is among the various songs the ChristmasCarolers sing. Perhaps it's simply SuspiciouslyAproposMusic in-universe.Christmas carolers sing, and is also the tune Scrooge's watch makes when it chimes.


* ParlorGames: The guests at Fred's Christmas party are playing "Similes". Fred says the first part of a common expression, such as "Quiet as..." or "Tight as...", which the player then has to fill in ('a mouse' and 'a drum', respectively). The answer given, though, "As tight as your Uncle Ebenezer's pockets."

to:

* ParlorGames: The guests at Fred's Christmas party are playing "Similes". Fred says the first part of a common expression, such as "Quiet as..." or "Tight as...", which the player then has to fill in ('a mouse' and 'a drum', respectively). The answer given, though, "As tight is "Tight as your Uncle Ebenezer's pockets.purse strings."


* LiteralGenie: The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come does this when Scrooge begs him to "take him home": he takes him to the grave he's buried in, since that's his 'home' now.

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* LiteralGenie: The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come does this when Scrooge begs him to "take him home": he home." He takes him to the grave he's buried in, since that's his 'home' now.


Added DiffLines:

** As Scrooge begs to be spared, the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come's hand can be seen trembling, a minor detail from the book usually left out.

Added DiffLines:

* {{Foreshadowing}}: The last simile thrown out in Fred's game is "Silent as the grave," shortly before the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come arrives.

Added DiffLines:

* StepfordSnarker: This Scrooge uses humor, anger, and denial as defense mechanisms even as he's clearly shaken and softening by what he witnesses.


* AdaptationalVillainy: This version of Scrooge comes across as a great deal colder than the original. Rather than being indifferent he seems to find the suffering of others darkly amusing. He also makes more efforts to defend himself from the spirits than in most versions.

to:

* AdaptationalVillainy: AdaptationalVillainy:
**
This version of Scrooge comes across as a great deal colder than the original. Rather than being indifferent he seems to find the suffering of others darkly amusing. He also makes more efforts to defend himself from the spirits than in most versions.versions.
** Scrooge's father also gets this. As in the book, Fan tells young Scrooge that their father has changed and wishes him home. When Scrooge meets him, however, he's still cold and dismissive of his son and only sees him for three days before making him work at Fezziwig's.

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