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History Creator / PieterBruegelTheElder

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* GettingCrapPastTheRadar: Bruegel made several scenes that were subtle criticisms of the government and the Spanish occupiers. Although some probably didn't fly over the heads of everybody in power (Jesuit-educated patrons were most likely to twig -- and accept the digs as a clever call to humility), most of what he had to say seems to have, thanks to his sticking mainly to Diets.

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%% * GettingCrapPastTheRadar: Bruegel made several scenes that were subtle criticisms of GettingCrapPastThe Radar: Due to overwhelming and persistent misuse, GCPTR is on-page examples only until 01 June 2021. If you are reading this in the government and future, please check the Spanish occupiers. Although some probably didn't fly over trope page to make sure your example fits the heads of everybody in power (Jesuit-educated patrons were most likely to twig -- and accept the digs as a clever call to humility), most of what he had to say seems to have, thanks to his sticking mainly to Diets.current definition.


* TheDungAges: Despite living in the 16th century, when the Middle Ages had already ended, Breugel's depictions of Flemish folk life still breathe the living spirit of medieval society, showing everything from the downright fun to the absolutely horrible.

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* TheDungAges: Despite living in the 16th century, when the Middle Ages had already ended, and [[UsefulNotes/TheProtestantReformation there were some religious upheavals]], Breugel's depictions of Flemish folk life still breathe the living spirit of medieval society, showing everything from the downright fun to the absolutely horrible.


'''Pieter Bruegel the Elder''' (circa 1525-1530 9 September 1569) was a 16th-century Flemish painter, most famous for his depictions of the life of the common people or peasants. During his lifetime and even centuries later most people looked down upon Bruegel's art. Art critics felt it was nothing more than a vulgar depiction of everyday life without any actual esthetic merit. While many of his contemporaries painted pictures of royals, rich people and religious scenes Bruegel had attention for the lower and undervalued classes of society.

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'''Pieter Pieter Bruegel the Elder''' Elder (circa 1525-1530 9 September 1569) was a 16th-century Flemish painter, most famous for his depictions of the life of the common people or peasants. During his lifetime and even centuries later most people looked down upon Bruegel's art. Art critics felt it was nothing more than a vulgar depiction of everyday life without any actual esthetic merit. While many of his contemporaries painted pictures of royals, rich people and religious scenes Bruegel had attention for the lower and undervalued classes of society.


'''Pieter Bruegel the Elder''' (1525-1569) was a 16th-century Flemish painter, most famous for his depictions of the life of the common people or peasants. During his lifetime and even centuries later most people looked down upon Bruegel's art. Art critics felt it was nothing more than a vulgar depiction of everyday life without any actual esthetic merit. While many of his contemporaries painted pictures of royals, rich people and religious scenes Bruegel had attention for the lower and undervalued classes of society.

to:

'''Pieter Bruegel the Elder''' (1525-1569) (circa 1525-1530 9 September 1569) was a 16th-century Flemish painter, most famous for his depictions of the life of the common people or peasants. During his lifetime and even centuries later most people looked down upon Bruegel's art. Art critics felt it was nothing more than a vulgar depiction of everyday life without any actual esthetic merit. While many of his contemporaries painted pictures of royals, rich people and religious scenes Bruegel had attention for the lower and undervalued classes of society.


As TimeMarchesOn, Bruegel's paintings and drawings have been VindicatedByHistory because of their historical importance. His art is almost like a documentary of 16th century everyday life. If it wasn't for Bruegel our knowledge about the ordinary people might have been LostForever. The man depicted their seasonal activities, feasts, work, proverbs, sayings, children's games,... and even minority groups like blind and crippled people.

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As TimeMarchesOn, Bruegel's paintings and drawings have been VindicatedByHistory because of their historical importance. His art is almost like a documentary of 16th century everyday life. If it wasn't for Bruegel our knowledge about the ordinary people might have been LostForever.lost forever. The man depicted their seasonal activities, feasts, work, proverbs, sayings, children's games,... and even minority groups like blind and crippled people.



* LostForever: On his death bed Bruegel told his wife to destroy some of his drawings and paintings, because they could cause problems for her if the authorities discovered them. And she did.


* TheDungAges: Despite living in the 16th century, when the Middle Ages had already ended, Breugel's depictions of Flemish folk life still breathe the spirit of medieval society.

to:

* TheDungAges: Despite living in the 16th century, when the Middle Ages had already ended, Breugel's depictions of Flemish folk life still breathe the living spirit of medieval society. society, showing everything from the downright fun to the absolutely horrible.



* GettingCrapPastTheRadar: Bruegel made several scenes that were subtle criticisms of the government and the Spanish occupiers.

to:

* GettingCrapPastTheRadar: Bruegel made several scenes that were subtle criticisms of the government and the Spanish occupiers. Although some probably didn't fly over the heads of everybody in power (Jesuit-educated patrons were most likely to twig -- and accept the digs as a clever call to humility), most of what he had to say seems to have, thanks to his sticking mainly to Diets.



* LowerClassLout and MedievalMorons: At the time the upper and middle class took delight in Bruegel's unflattering portrayals of the lower classes.

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* LowerClassLout and MedievalMorons: At the time the upper and middle class took delight in Bruegel's unflattering portrayals of the lower classes.classes... thereby often missing many of the critical points of the pieces.



* SpookyPainting: "De Dulle Griet" ("Dull Gret") and "The Triumph Of Death"

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* SpookyPainting: "De Dulle Griet" ("Dull Gret") Gret/ Margaret") and "The Triumph Of Death"Death". A less busy, and famous, one is his "De Hexen" ("The Witches") -- the whole thing sets you to tingles even before his usual, multi-layered truckload of Fridges hits you.


* DoesThisRemindYouOfAnything: In a case of WhatDoYouMeanItsNotPolitical certain scenes in Bruegel's paintings are assumed to be veiled criticism of the Spanish occupation of the Netherlands.

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* DoesThisRemindYouOfAnything: In a case of WhatDoYouMeanItsNotPolitical WhatDoYouMeanItsNotPolitical, certain scenes in Bruegel's paintings are assumed to be veiled criticism of the Spanish occupation of the Netherlands.



* TheEveryman: And woman. The focal characters of many of his paintings aren't, on the face of it, anybody special, nor particularly heroic even if they are doing daringly stupid-amazing things. Just people being people, warts and all. Helped codify the trope with his output.

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* TheEveryman: And woman. The focal characters of many of his paintings aren't, on the face of it, anybody special, nor are they particularly heroic even if they are doing daringly stupid-amazing things. Just people being people, warts and all. Helped codify the trope with his output.



* NobleSavage: Partly subverted: Bruegel acknowledged their existence in his work when other artists mostly ignored peasants and ordinary people, but he didn't glamorize them either.

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* NobleSavage: Partly subverted: Bruegel certainly acknowledged their existence in his work during a time when other artists mostly ignored peasants and ordinary people, but he didn't glamorize them them, either.



* RiddleForTheAges: Some scenes are still a mystery to art historians, mostly because they are supposedly based on sayings of the day or allusions to certain people that have now fallen into obscurity.

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* RiddleForTheAges: Some scenes are still a mystery to art historians, mostly because they are supposedly based on sayings of the day or allusions to certain certain, very specific people that have now both fallen into obscurity.



* UnintentionalPeriodPiece: Bruegel was able to catch late medieval/early Renaissance society while it was happening. His work offers historians a unique glimpse in the living conditions of the ordinary people at that time about whom we don't know very much compared with the royals and aristocrats.

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* UnintentionalPeriodPiece: Bruegel was able to catch late medieval/early Renaissance society while it was happening. His work offers historians a unique glimpse in the living conditions of the ordinary people at that time about whom we don't know very much compared with the royals and aristocrats. A case in point: close study of his works has answered questions about the evolution of bagpipes and accordions... As well as raised new ones.

Added DiffLines:

* TheEveryman: And woman. The focal characters of many of his paintings aren't, on the face of it, anybody special, nor particularly heroic even if they are doing daringly stupid-amazing things. Just people being people, warts and all. Helped codify the trope with his output.


* DeadpanSnarker: A lot of his art contains both subtle and not-so-subtle digs at politicians, church officials and the rank-and-file troops of the day, alongside the general broadsides at human vagaries, vanities and stupidities -- especially if you could decode the Diets or Duits allegories. It's almost amusing so many Spanish and Austrian Hapsburg palaces had a Brueghel (or some copy) or two hanging in them, considering how often he placed veiled digs at their regimes and policies in his works. He was always careful, however, not to cross too many lines and made sure to hide behind either the language barrier or [[PlausibleDeniability established religious themes]]: the Inquisition was a very real danger.

to:

* DeadpanSnarker: A lot of his art contains both subtle and not-so-subtle digs at politicians, church officials and the rank-and-file troops of the day, alongside the general broadsides at human vagaries, vanities and stupidities -- especially if you could decode the Diets or Duits allegories. It's almost amusing so many Spanish and Austrian Hapsburg palaces had a Brueghel (or some copy) or two hanging in them, considering how often he placed veiled digs at their regimes and policies in his works. He was always careful, however, not to cross too many lines and made sure to hide behind either [[HidingBehindTheLanguageBarrier the language barrier barrier]] or [[PlausibleDeniability established religious themes]]: the Inquisition was a very real danger.


* DeadpanSnarker: A lot of his art contains both subtle and not-so-subtle digs at politicians, church officials and the rank-and-file troops of the day -- especially if you could decode the Diets or Duits allegories. It's almost amusing so many Spanish and Austrian Hapsburg palaces had a Bruehel (or some copy) or two hanging in them, considering how often he placed veiled digs at their regimes and policies in his works. He was always careful, however, not to cross too many lines and hide behind either the language barrier or established religious themes: the Inquisition was a very real danger.

to:

* DeadpanSnarker: A lot of his art contains both subtle and not-so-subtle digs at politicians, church officials and the rank-and-file troops of the day day, alongside the general broadsides at human vagaries, vanities and stupidities -- especially if you could decode the Diets or Duits allegories. It's almost amusing so many Spanish and Austrian Hapsburg palaces had a Bruehel Brueghel (or some copy) or two hanging in them, considering how often he placed veiled digs at their regimes and policies in his works. He was always careful, however, not to cross too many lines and made sure to hide behind either the language barrier or [[PlausibleDeniability established religious themes: themes]]: the Inquisition was a very real danger.


* DeadpanSnarker: A lot of his art contains both subtle and not-so-subtle digs at politicians, church officials and the rank-and-file troops of the day -- especially if you could decode the Diets or Duits allegories. It's almost amusing so many Spanish and Austrian Hapsburg palaces had a Bruehel (or some copy) or two hanging in them, considering how often he placed veiled digs at their regimes and policies.

to:

* DeadpanSnarker: A lot of his art contains both subtle and not-so-subtle digs at politicians, church officials and the rank-and-file troops of the day -- especially if you could decode the Diets or Duits allegories. It's almost amusing so many Spanish and Austrian Hapsburg palaces had a Bruehel (or some copy) or two hanging in them, considering how often he placed veiled digs at their regimes and policies.policies in his works. He was always careful, however, not to cross too many lines and hide behind either the language barrier or established religious themes: the Inquisition was a very real danger.


* DeadpanSnarker: A lot of his art contains both subtle and not-so-subtle digs at politicians, church officials and the rank-and-file troops of the day. It's almost amusing so many Spanish and Austrian Hapsburg palaces had a Bruehel (or some copy) or two hanging in them, considering how often he placed veiled digs at their regimes and policies.

to:

* DeadpanSnarker: A lot of his art contains both subtle and not-so-subtle digs at politicians, church officials and the rank-and-file troops of the day.day -- especially if you could decode the Diets or Duits allegories. It's almost amusing so many Spanish and Austrian Hapsburg palaces had a Bruehel (or some copy) or two hanging in them, considering how often he placed veiled digs at their regimes and policies.

Added DiffLines:

* DeadpanSnarker: A lot of his art contains both subtle and not-so-subtle digs at politicians, church officials and the rank-and-file troops of the day. It's almost amusing so many Spanish and Austrian Hapsburg palaces had a Bruehel (or some copy) or two hanging in them, considering how often he placed veiled digs at their regimes and policies.


* AnachronismStew: Done intentionally for effect. While many of Brueghel's paintings depict events from Literature/TheBible or ClassicalMythology, they take place in landscapes clearly defined by early modern reality, with characters dressed in clothing and carrying weapons from the 16th century. Brueghel thus represented his themes in a universal manner and made statements about the society he lived in. The fact that the central (biblical or classical) events are often easily overlooked in the huge landscapes only makes this effect stronger.

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* AnachronismStew: Done intentionally for effect. While many of Brueghel's paintings depict events from Literature/TheBible or ClassicalMythology, Myth/ClassicalMythology, they take place in landscapes clearly defined by early modern reality, with characters dressed in clothing and carrying weapons from the 16th century. Brueghel thus represented his themes in a universal manner and made statements about the society he lived in. The fact that the central (biblical or classical) events are often easily overlooked in the huge landscapes only makes this effect stronger.


Art historians have also revalued Bruegel as an artist. On first glance the peasants on his paintings seem to be ugly, almost caricatural depictions of primitive countryfolks. But actually everything has been painted with the greatest eye for realism and detail. Bruegel's landscapes and crowd scenes in particular always keep your attention and often overshadow the actual topic of the paintings. His work shows a universal love for nature and the simple country life without romanticizing it.

to:

Art historians have also revalued Bruegel as an artist. On first glance the peasants on his paintings seem to be ugly, almost caricatural depictions of primitive countryfolks. But actually everything has been painted with the greatest eye for realism and detail. Bruegel's landscapes and crowd scenes in particular always keep your attention and often overshadow the actual topic of the paintings. His work shows a universal [[InHarmonyWithNature love for nature nature]] and the [[{{Arcadia}} simple country life life]] without romanticizing it.



* CallToAgriculture: Bruegel enjoyed the peasant life and reflected the hardships and the fun of the common man.
* ChristianityIsCatholic

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* CallToAgriculture: Bruegel enjoyed the peasant life and reflected the hardships and the fun of the common man. \n* ChristianityIsCatholic



* GrotesqueGallery: Bruegel was well known for his unflattering but realistic portayals of peasants and regular folks.

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* GrotesqueGallery: Bruegel was well known for his Though not as grotesque as Creator/HieronymusBosch he portrayed peasants as quite crude, unflattering but realistic portayals of not always good looking people. The main difference is that his portrayals are still realistically believable and not fantasies. Thus you actually get to see these people as ''real'' peasants as they existed back then and regular folks.not some romanticized vision.



** Both W.H. Auden and the rock group Music/TitusAndronicus have written a poem and a song about Bruegel's "Fall Of Icarus".

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** Both W.H. Auden Creator/WHAuden and the rock group Music/TitusAndronicus have written a poem and a song about Bruegel's "Fall Of Icarus".



* UnintentionalPeriodPiece: Bruegel was able to catch late medieval/early Renaissance society while it was happening.His work offers historians a unique glimpse in the living conditions of the ordinary people at that time about whom we don't know very much compared with the royals and aristocrats.
* WarIsHell: ''The Triumph Of Death''
* WorldOfSymbolism: Like many painters of his day Bruegel added a lot of christian symbolism in his work.

to:

* UnintentionalPeriodPiece: Bruegel was able to catch late medieval/early Renaissance society while it was happening. His work offers historians a unique glimpse in the living conditions of the ordinary people at that time about whom we don't know very much compared with the royals and aristocrats.
* WarIsHell: ''The Triumph Of Death''
Death'' portrays skeletons as soldiers too.
* WorldOfSymbolism: Like many painters of his day Bruegel added a lot of christian Christian symbolism in his work.

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