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* HereditaryTwinhood: Twin births are the norm on Winath, to the point that children born without a twin, like the villain Lightning Lord, are outcasts in Winathian society.


* TeleportersAndTransporters: Gates.

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* TeleportersAndTransporters: {{Teleportation}}: Gates.


** Explicitly forbidden in most versions of the Legion's constitution. Any hero whose only powers are derived from an external source (like a belt, ring, or clothes) are not allowed to serve on the team. Examples include the first Kid Quantum (whose death led to the adoption of the rule in the first place, in the reboot version) and any member of the ComicBook/GreenLanternCorps.

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** Explicitly forbidden in most versions of the Legion's constitution. Any hero whose only powers are derived from an external source (like a belt, ring, or clothes) are not allowed to serve on the team. Examples include the first Kid Quantum (whose death led to the adoption of the rule in the first place, in the reboot version) and any member of the ComicBook/GreenLanternCorps.[[Franchise/GreenLantern Green Lantern Corps]].


** Some time after the Five-Year time-skip, Tenzil Kem (Matter-Eater Lad) had lost his seat as senator on his homeworld of Bismol after he was wrongly believed dead. Tenzil briefly considered what kind of funeral service he was given, quipping, "[[Creator/SteveMartin I don't want no fancy funeral,]] [[Series/SaturdayNightLive just one like ol' King Tut's.]]"

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** Some time after the Five-Year time-skip, Tenzil Kem (Matter-Eater Lad) had lost his seat as senator on his homeworld of Bismol after he was wrongly believed dead. Tenzil briefly considered what kind of funeral service he was given, quipping, "[[Creator/SteveMartin I don't want no fancy funeral,]] funeral]], [[Series/SaturdayNightLive just one like ol' King Tut's.]]"Tut's]]".
** A meeting of the Legion of super-Villains is framed in a way that resembled the ''The Last Supper'' painting, with Lightning Lord the apparent leader in the center where Christ should be.


* AlanSmithee: The final issue of the Threeboot Legion, which rapidly tied up all the plot threads before ''ComicBook/FinalCrisis'' gave us the original Legion again, was apparently written by "Justin Thyme".

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** Brainiac 5 is this to the original Comicbook/{{Brainiac}}.


** The massive Levitz-Giffen version from the 1980s brought in minor characters Esper Lass (standing in for Saturn Queen, who had only every appeared as a member of the "Adult" LSV, as Saturn Girl's counterpart), Ol-Vir (a [[TheRemnant Darkseid-worshipping Daxamite]] left over from the Great Darkness Saga who oppose Mon-El), Micro Lad (a villain from Shrinking Violet's homeworld who was essentially a WesternTerrorist) and Magno Lad (a JerkJock who, along with Esper Lass, had previously tried to bully his way into replacing Cosmic Boy in the Legion). It also used Cosmic King as a counterpart to the similarly powered Element Lad.

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** The massive Levitz-Giffen version from the 1980s brought in minor characters Esper Lass (standing in for Saturn Queen, who had only every appeared as a member of the "Adult" LSV, as Saturn Girl's counterpart), Ol-Vir (a [[TheRemnant Darkseid-worshipping Daxamite]] left over from the Great Darkness Saga who oppose Mon-El), Micro Lad (a villain from Shrinking Violet's homeworld who was essentially a WesternTerrorist) WesternTerrorists) and Magno Lad (a JerkJock who, along with Esper Lass, had previously tried to bully his way into replacing Cosmic Boy in the Legion). It also used Cosmic King as a counterpart to the similarly powered Element Lad.

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* SonsOfSlaves: In the original timeline, Tyroc's people were descended from African slaves who escaped from slavery and found their way to a hidden island.


At the start of UsefulNotes/{{the Silver Age|of Comic Books}}, one story, in ''Adventure Comics'' #247 (April, 1958), introduced the "Legion of {{Super Hero}}es", a trio of super-powered teenagers from the future who committed many acts of SuperDickery while initiating Superboy into their club -- [[SecretTestOfCharacter with the best of intentions]], ''really''. The trio became popular enough to be seen again, as Superboy began traveling in time to team up with them, and the other new members they'd recruited.

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At the start of UsefulNotes/{{the Silver Age|of Comic Books}}, one story, in ''Adventure Comics'' #247 (April, 1958), introduced the "Legion of {{Super Hero}}es", a trio of super-powered teenagers from the future who committed many acts of SuperDickery questionable morality while initiating Superboy into their club -- [[SecretTestOfCharacter with the best of intentions]], ''really''. The trio became popular enough to be seen again, as Superboy began traveling in time to team up with them, and the other new members they'd recruited.


* An irregular series of backups in ''ComicBook/{{Superboy}}'' (1971-1973), along with a four issue reprint series in 1973 titled ''Legion of Super-Heroes'' (volume 1)
* ''ComicBook/{{Superboy}}'' with issue #197 became the Legion's comic and was renamed to ''Superboy and/starring the Legion of Super-Heroes'' (1973-1980). Renamed again to ''Legion of Super-Heroes'' (volume 2, 1980-1984) with issue #259 this period includes the storyline ''ComicBook/TheGreatDarknessSaga''. Renamed again to ''Tales of the Legion of Super-Heroes'' (1984-1985).

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* An irregular series of backups in ''ComicBook/{{Superboy}}'' (1971-1973), along with a four issue reprint series in 1973 titled (1971-1973).
*
''Legion of Super-Heroes'' (volume 1)
1) (1973), a four-issue miniseries reprinting the backups from ''Superboy''.
* ''ComicBook/{{Superboy}}'' with issue #197 became the Legion's comic and was renamed to ''Superboy and/starring the Legion of Super-Heroes'' (1973-1980). Renamed again to ''Legion of Super-Heroes'' (volume 2, 1980-1984) with issue #259 this period includes the storyline ''ComicBook/TheGreatDarknessSaga''. Renamed again to ''Tales of the Legion of Super-Heroes'' (1984-1985).(1984-1987) with issue #314, which continued with original stories until issue #325 and afterwards switched to reprints.


This version, ''also'' introduced by Mark Waid, brought back many of the more idealistic elements, including the SomethingPerson names, while going for a more complex universe. In this incarnation, the Legion are firebrands and muckrakers in a future where those under 18 are almost entirely controlled by their parents and a paternalistic government; although only a chosen few are given flight rings (which are ridiculously expensive), anyone who follows their ideals is considered a Legionnaire. It also added twists to many of the characters; for instance, in this version, Colossal Boy is a member of a race of giants whose super-power is to shrink to six feet tall. (He prefers to be called Micro Lad.) Their inspiration this time is legends of superheroics as preserved in old comic books. ComicBook/{{Supergirl}} joined up about a year and a half into the series, having apparently made the trip during the "One Year Gap" in her own title (all DC books jumped forward a year after ''Infinite Crisis''), and been given LaserGuidedAmnesia before she was sent back. On the other hand, the political aspects ("Eat it, Grandpa!") wore thin for some readers. This version lasted until 2009, when, despite fan favorite Creator/JimShooter taking over writing duties, it was unceremoniously cancelled with a rushed final issue written by "[[AlanSmithee Justin Thyme]]".

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This version, ''also'' introduced by Mark Waid, brought back many of the more idealistic Silver-Age-ish elements, including the SomethingPerson names, while going for a more complex universe.DarkerAndEdgier feel. In this incarnation, the Legion are firebrands and muckrakers in a future where those under 18 are almost entirely controlled by their parents and a paternalistic government; although only a chosen few are given flight rings (which are ridiculously expensive), anyone who follows their ideals is considered a Legionnaire. It also added twists to many of the characters; for instance, in this version, Colossal Boy is a member of a race of giants whose super-power is to shrink to six feet tall. (He prefers to be called Micro Lad.) Their inspiration this time is legends of superheroics as preserved in old comic books. ComicBook/{{Supergirl}} joined up about a year and a half into the series, having apparently made the trip during the "One Year Gap" in her own title (all DC books jumped forward a year after ''Infinite Crisis''), and been given LaserGuidedAmnesia before she was sent back. On the other hand, the political aspects ("Eat it, Grandpa!") wore thin for some readers. This version lasted until 2009, when, despite fan favorite Creator/JimShooter taking over writing duties, it was unceremoniously cancelled with a rushed final issue written by "[[AlanSmithee Justin Thyme]]".



* ''ComicBook/{{Superboy}}'' with issue 197 became the Legion's comic and was renamed to ''Superboy and/starring the Legion of Super-Heroes'' (1973-1980).
* Renamed again to ''Legion of Super-Heroes'' (volume 2, 1980-1984).
* ''ComicBook/TheGreatDarknessSaga'' (1982).
* Renamed to ''Tales of the Legion of Super-Heroes'' (1984-1985).

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* ''ComicBook/{{Superboy}}'' with issue 197 #197 became the Legion's comic and was renamed to ''Superboy and/starring the Legion of Super-Heroes'' (1973-1980).
*
(1973-1980). Renamed again to ''Legion of Super-Heroes'' (volume 2, 1980-1984).
* ''ComicBook/TheGreatDarknessSaga'' (1982).
*
1980-1984) with issue #259 this period includes the storyline ''ComicBook/TheGreatDarknessSaga''. Renamed again to ''Tales of the Legion of Super-Heroes'' (1984-1985).


Eventually, a combination of [[ContinuitySnarl continuity issues]] and low sales brought DC to the point where they said "screw it" and decided to reboot the series altogether. In 1995, as part of the ''Zero Hour'' CrisisCrossover, Creator/MarkWaid and Tom [=McCraw=] wrote the first issue of an all-new all-different Legion. Some of the sillier characters were pruned, and others were introduced to fill the gaps. This incarnation of the Legion was a youth corps run by TheFederation, which was just forming as the series began, to symbolize its member worlds and species working together. (Although they were frequently dismissed as either a publicity stunt or a "teenage death squad".) This version sidestepped the Superboy issue by being inspired by the 20th century's age of heroes in general (although the Post-Crisis Superboy did become a member). The new version attempted to [[AdaptationDistillation distill]] all of the Legion's history to date, while adding its own twists -- some of which [[FanonDiscontinuity didn't work that well]] ([[spoiler:Sneckie]]) Still, this version lasted until 2004 with a few writer changes and {{ReTool}}s; then, they were wiped out (or at least [[PutOnABus detached from the main line of DCU history]]) during the build up to the ''ComicBook/InfiniteCrisis'' CrisisCrossover, and replaced with a third version -- the "threeboot" Legion.

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Eventually, a combination of [[ContinuitySnarl continuity issues]] and low sales brought DC to the point where they said "screw it" and decided to reboot the series altogether. In 1995, as part of the ''Zero Hour'' CrisisCrossover, Creator/MarkWaid and Tom [=McCraw=] wrote the first issue of an all-new all-different Legion. Some of the sillier characters were pruned, and others were introduced to fill the gaps. This incarnation of the Legion was a youth corps run by TheFederation, which was just forming as the series began, to symbolize its member worlds and species working together. (Although they were frequently dismissed as either a publicity stunt or a "teenage death squad".) This version sidestepped the Superboy issue by being inspired by the 20th century's age of heroes in general (although the Post-Crisis Superboy did become a member). The new version attempted to [[AdaptationDistillation distill]] all of the Legion's history to date, while adding its own twists -- some of which [[FanonDiscontinuity didn't work that well]] ([[spoiler:Sneckie]]) well]]. Still, this version lasted until 2004 with a few writer changes and {{ReTool}}s; then, they were wiped out (or at least [[PutOnABus detached from the main line of DCU history]]) during the build up to the ''ComicBook/InfiniteCrisis'' CrisisCrossover, and replaced with a third version -- the "threeboot" Legion.


* ContinuitySnarl: And how.



* MasterOfIllusion: Princess Projectra fits this trope when her powers aren't about detecting threats.

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* MasterOfIllusion: Princess Projectra fits this trope when her powers aren't about detecting threats.royally.

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* ContinuitySnarl: Legionnaires issues 0 and 1 both set the tone for leapfrogging with Legion of Superheroes Vol4 around it's 63rd issue, then Legionnaires took a break from issues 2 through 18, even though #2 appeared to take place after #19.


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