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Total posts: [474]
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Books or Lit-r-cha Recommendations:

Any good books on:

History of china, especially early. The development of horror films over the years. A history of literature movements.
 
 2 Tzetze, Tue, 2nd Nov '10 10:36:33 AM from a converted church in Venice, Italy
 3 Aoede, Tue, 2nd Nov '10 11:09:23 AM from tiptop scrublot
You asking for fiction or nonfiction, bud?
survival of the tight-lipped
nonfiction.
 
0^10 = nothing at all
I'm currently reading a very good book about Asian history called "East Asia at the Center, " by Warren Cohen. It covers the highlights of Asian history from 1000 BC until the late 90s. It gives a good perspective on the region that China is a major part of, which will help you understand some of the events it has been involved in.

Then I would get a general history of China, like Keay's China: A History.

From there, it really depends on what period catches your interest. I'm really interested in the modern period (after 1840), so I know titles like The Boxer Rebellion by Preston or the Hungry Ghosts by Becker. Jonathan Spence worked a lot on the Ming and Qing eras, and while I haven't read them, he's considered one of the best Chinese historians of recent memory.

China itself has presented so many faces to the world, and has such a rich and complex history and culture that digging into the literature about it is mostly about picking a place to start. Go to a library, start borrowing book that interest you. Read the bibliographies, find the titles in there that interest you. Repeat.

Dang. I was totally going to recommend Bridge of Birds.
 7 Wicked 223, Tue, 14th Jun '11 8:11:26 AM from Death Star in the forest
I'm looking for:

  1. A medieval fantasy story in the vein of A Song of Ice and Fire
  2. Any books on literary criticism, preferably introductory ones
  3. Any books on game design and theory, preferably focusing on player-game interaction (or whatever the term is)

edited 14th Jun '11 8:11:42 AM by Wicked223

You can't even write racist abuse in excrement on somebody's car without the politically correct brigade jumping down your throat!
[up] 1. The Malazan Book of the Fallen
"You want to see how a human dies? At ramming speed." - Emily Wong.
 9 chihuahua 0, Wed, 15th Jun '11 2:22:14 PM from Standoff, USA Relationship Status: I'm in love with my car
Writer's Welcome Wagon
I'm looking for a Young Adult book where the protagonists are ghost hunters, or at least fight spirits.

 10 slowzombie, Wed, 15th Jun '11 2:26:42 PM from Way up North
Platypus!
The Last Apprentice might fit the bill. Not much ghost-hunting in the first book, but there's elements of it, and the second book is a bit more ghost-centric (or at least so the synopsis will have me believe)
 11 Noaqiyeum, Thu, 16th Jun '11 5:00:09 PM from a thought-experiment gone horribly wrong Relationship Status: Showing feelings of an almost human nature
the it-thingy
In lieu of the lengthier and scarily specific request I posted in a different thread... <_<

...do you have any Thirty Xanatos Pile Ups with a Guile Hero or some and an Earn Your Happy Ending?
"I know I raised more questions than I answered, but I hope now we are all confused on an higher level and about more important things."
 12 Yuanchosaan, Fri, 17th Jun '11 6:35:53 PM from Australia Relationship Status:
antic disposition
@Wicked:

1. The Stormlight Archive, Crown of Stars

2. This is a difficult request. The majority of literary criticism published nowadays assumes you already have knowledge of X movements prior. My suggestion is to buy an anthology of literary criticism essays from different periods, but I have no idea how much you already know about lit. crit.

edited 17th Jun '11 6:37:44 PM by Yuanchosaan

"Doctor Who means never having to say you're kidding." - Bocaj
 13 lalalei 2001, Sat, 18th Jun '11 1:43:04 PM from At my computer. Relationship Status: I <3 love!
Any good books about clones?
The Protomen enhanced my life.
 14 Yuanchosaan, Tue, 21st Jun '11 5:42:20 AM from Australia Relationship Status:
antic disposition
Finishing off The Trial tonight. I would like to read something happier than Kafka. Please recommend something joyous, tropers.
"Doctor Who means never having to say you're kidding." - Bocaj
[up]

PG Wodehouse is the definition of light and enjoyable. Complete opposite of Kafka. What I turned to after finishing the harrowing Catch-22.
"You want to see how a human dies? At ramming speed." - Emily Wong.
 16 Yuanchosaan, Wed, 22nd Jun '11 1:26:34 AM from Australia Relationship Status:
antic disposition
Ah! Of course. I was rereading The Little Prince, but I do think I have some Wodehouse lying around.
"Doctor Who means never having to say you're kidding." - Bocaj
@Wicked: For a really basic book on literary criticism (like, stuff they make high school kids read) you could try How To Read Literature Like a Professor by Thomas Foster. His tone is a bit annoying (like your 50-year-old uncle desperately trying to be "hip") but the content is a good, basic introduction to critical reading.
"War doesn't prove who's right, only who's left."

"Every saint has a past, every sinner has a future."
 18 Loid, Fri, 24th Jun '11 4:06:56 AM from Eastern Standard Time
Does anybody have any recommendations for the following:

  • Socialist teachings that aren't by Marx or Engels
  • Chinese literature
  • Zombie books
  • War books, especially the World Wars or the Cold War
  • Anything that has twins
"Dr. Strangeloid, or How I Learned To Stop Worrying And Love The Cleanlink" - thespacephantom
 19 Yuanchosaan, Fri, 24th Jun '11 4:16:25 AM from Australia Relationship Status:
antic disposition
By war books, do you mean non-fiction books about the war, or literature set during the war? For the latter, I recommend Catch-22 and The Spy Who Came in from the Cold.
"Doctor Who means never having to say you're kidding." - Bocaj
 20 Loid, Fri, 24th Jun '11 4:19:32 AM from Eastern Standard Time
The second one and thank you.
"Dr. Strangeloid, or How I Learned To Stop Worrying And Love The Cleanlink" - thespacephantom
Wizard Basement
Where can I find literature that has similar composition, emotional resonance and form as Death Metal? I'm thinking that Perfume The Story Of A Murderer might be one of these.

And where can I find more books that are as bizarre as arthouse movies?
Hell Hasn't Earned My Tears
 22 Noaqiyeum, Sat, 25th Jun '11 7:25:13 AM from a thought-experiment gone horribly wrong Relationship Status: Showing feelings of an almost human nature
the it-thingy
Look up the Oulipo. I'm certain they'll have exactly what you're looking for.

Also, still waiting for a response on this...
"I know I raised more questions than I answered, but I hope now we are all confused on an higher level and about more important things."
With regards to war novels- as well as Catch-22, try All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque, The Thin Red Line by James Jones and Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut.

edited 25th Jun '11 10:09:01 AM by Falco

"You want to see how a human dies? At ramming speed." - Emily Wong.
 24 slowzombie, Sat, 25th Jun '11 10:27:17 AM from Way up North
Platypus!
@post 18:

Zombie books: World War Z is pretty good, also, the Newsflesh series, or at least the first book, Feed, was pretty good. Can't speak for the second one, yet.
 25 Yuanchosaan, Sat, 25th Jun '11 6:27:10 PM from Australia Relationship Status:
antic disposition
Noaq: Hm...I haven't read it myself, but The Lies of Locke Lamora might fit. I feel like I'm missing something obvious, though, so I'll try to think of something else.

Geek Philosopher: Taking a glance at my bookshelf for general "weird stuff": The Master and Margarita by Mikhail Bulgakov, anything by Borges, a lot of Italo Calvino's work - look for Invisible Cities in particular, Foucault's Pendulum by Umberto Eco, Hopscotch by Julio Cortázar (best book I've ever read), One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel García Márquez (though I wasn't a huge fan of it), The Trial, Life of Pi by Yann Martel.

I'm not a fan of death metal, so I don't really know what you mean by that request. I wouldn't say Perfume is like it, though, but it's a good book nonetheless.
"Doctor Who means never having to say you're kidding." - Bocaj
Total posts: 474
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