YMMV / The 1975

  • Alternative Character Interpretation: 'Medicine' was initially believed to be a love song about a girl... until Matty explicitly said it wasn't. The two prevailing theories are that it's either about a friendship/romantic relationship with a man, or drugs.
    • Is 'Paris' about some kind of wild drug experience/holiday with an ex-girlfriend, or is 'Paris' really just a metaphor for heroin/cocaine?
  • Anvilicious: "M.O.N.E.Y." isn't exactly subtle with its Drugs Are Bad message.
  • Base Breaker: Matty. Although he's by far the most famous and recognizable out of the band, there's still a significant section of fans who consider him self-centred and attention seeking. This isn't really helped by his blunt approach to interviews.
  • Big Lipped Alligator Moment/Nausea Fuel: That one part in the "Girls" video where a woman randomly pukes pink fluid.
  • Black Sheep Hit: "Chocolate" and "Sex" are different than the band's usual style.
  • Creator Breakdown: Matty Healy was going plenty of personal issues during the writing and recording of 'I like it when you sleep...'. On songs like 'Ballad of me and my Brain' it shows.
  • Crowning Music of Awesome: Adam's very Adrian Belew-esque guitar solos during "Love Me" and "The Sound".
  • Darkness-Induced Audience Apathy: Matty presents himself so unsympathetically sometimes that it can be difficult to feel sorry for him at time—this is particularly evident in songs like 'Change Of Heart' and 'Paris.'
  • Ear Worm: Oh, dear Lord. When it comes to ear worms, The 1975 probably have even more than Justin Bieber does.
    • "We go where nobody knows, we've guns hidden under our petticoats..."
    • "Yeah, you wanna find love, then you know where the city is!"
    • "Drink slow to feed the nose, you know he likes to get blown..."
    • "It's just you and I tonight, why don't you figure my heart out?"
    • "For cryin' out loud, settle down!"
    • "They're just girls, they're just girls..."
    • "There's a change in pressure! I'm never gonna lie to YOU~!"
    • "Oh, I just had a change of heart..."
    • "And LOVE ME! (If that's what you wanna do)"
    • "You should be loving someone..."
    • "I don't want your body but I hate to think about you with somebody else..."
    • "I'm not giving it up again!"
  • Epic Riff: Lots of them.
    • The main synth hook of "Heart Out".
    • Many of their guitar riffs, particularly "Love Me", "The City", "Chocolate", "Sex", "Talk!", "Settle Down", "Girls", "Pressure" and "You", just to name a few.
  • Fandom Berserk Button: Saying '1975' instead of 'The 1975' or 'Matt Healy' is bound to get you a lot of pissed-off fans calling you out.
  • Fandom Rivalry: With the One Direction fan base, mostly as a result of Matty's aforementioned bluntness when it comes to interviews, especially when asked of his opinions on his contemporaries.
    • With fans of the British indie rock band Reverend and the Makers, of all people, after a rather hilarious twitter feud between Matty and John Mcclure.
    • A somewhat one-sided example with fans of Halsey; although Halsey fans often like The 1975, many The 1975 fans despise Halsey, most likely because of Matty and Halsey's rumoured relationship.
  • Mondegreen: Matty is notorious for his ridiculously thick British accent, making the majority of his lyrics incomprehensible without reading them.
  • Misaimed Fandom: The lyrics go to excruciating lengths to state that Drugs Are Bad, and songs like 'Ugh!', 'M.O.N.E.Y.' and 'Paris' centre on how ugly hard addiction can really be. Despite this, the 1975 fans are infamous for their fetishisation of drug culture, and many of them even claim the music made them want to become drug addicts.
  • Nightmare Fuel: The first three minutes of the video for 'Somebody Else' are particularly unsettling and surreal.
  • Periphery Demographic: The band is very popular among scene kids, of all people.
    • A lot of heavy metal musicians are huge fans of The 1975's music.
      • One of those was the late Architects guitarist and main songwriter Tom Searle, who Matty paid tribute to on twitter after Tom passed away from cancer at the age of 28. If Tom's brother and bandmate Dan is to be believed, The 1975 are very likely to be the last band Tom ever saw live before he died. A tearjerker, indeed.
  • Signature Song: "Chocolate", though if you read the article you might've thought it was "Sex", which isn't as famous as "Chocolate" but certainly more Troperiffic.
  • No Hit Wonder: Their highest charting song 'The Sound' only went to No. 15 in the UK, and none of their singles have charted on the Billboard Hot 100 in the US. Despite this, both their self-titled went to No. 1 in the UK, and their second album debuted at No. 1 in both the UK and the US.
  • Tear Jerker: "Is There Somebody Who Can Watch You?". With a melancholic tone, a stripped-down piano sound, and Matty's beautiful voice, it's one of the group's sadder songs. Oh, and it's the final track on their Self-Titled Album.
    • "Menswear" could also count- it's about a wedding that's going downhill rapidly.
    • "You". It's about an extremely dysfunctional relationship that the singer is still holding onto without really knowing why.
    • "Robbers" has a powerful tone and lyrics about a love affair that's about to go downhill. It ends in a Downer Ending that will make your heart get crushed into ashes.
    • "Sex" is often overlooked as just an Intercourse with You song, but if you take the time to actually delve deeper into it's meaning, the intercourse in question is being had with a girl who, despite the protagonist falling head over heels for her, already has a boyfriend (hence the constant repetition of "She's got a boyfriend anyway"). Coupled with the incredible instrumentation (the EP version features distorted and reverberated background guitars that sound like angels crying) and the desperate-sounding vocals (just listen to the way he sings the chorus), it's actually really, really saddening, especially if you've ever felt unrequited love for someone in a relationship, and have actually come that close to getting them.
    • "Me" has the protagonist flatly admitting that his actions have had serious consequences and that he's suicidal. Combine that with the melancholy music and Matty's emotionally-crushed tone, and you've got a song that's enough to make anyone break down.
    • At the end of 'Nana', Matty's voice cracks as he sings 'I'm bereft, you see/I think you can tell/I haven't been doing too well.'
    • All of 'She Lays Down'. They've only played it live once, and half way through, Matty has to start again after bursting into tears.
    • "A Change Of Heart" is a very direct and honest account of a relationship falling apart as two people fall out of love and start seeing each other as they really are. As light-hearted as the music sounds, the song's overall tone is chock-full of emotional exhaustion and despair.
    • Matty's aforementioned twitter tribute to Tom Searle.
    • Their cover of "What Makes You Beautiful" by One Direction. They completely re-arranged the song from a happy pop song to a piano-led ballad that sounds downright depressing. The most amazing thing about the dramatic shift in the mood is the lyrics and most of the vocal melodies remain completely the same.
      • It was made even more tearjerking when they performed it with the full orchestra.
  • They Changed It, Now It Sucks: A lot of fans haven't taken the band's second "Sex" video, which was done in color instead of the band's signature style of Deliberately Monochrome videos, very well.
    • Matty lampshades this at the beginning of the "Girls" video.
    Matty: Everything feels totally wrong. It's too...
    George: I mean...
    Matty: It's so pop...
    George: We're not a pop band.
    Matty: We're not a pop band, and it feels like a really... pop video. The whole scenario's not really what we're about. It needs to be black and white, for a start.
    • Surprisingly, averted with the transition from the black and white aesthetic of the self-titled to the neon pink of the second album. In fact, most fans seem to prefer the new era.