YMMV / StarCraft I

Subjective tropes applicable specifically to StarCraft I and its expansions only, please. For the series as a whole, see YMMV.StarCraft. SC2 subjectives go here.
  • Alternate Character Interpretation: Samir Duran was manipulating DuGalle's mind. Despite being an Admiral in the UED, DuGalle only succeeds because of his Hypercompetent Sidekick Stukov, on his own he proves himself a terrible tactician and a Horrible Judge of Character. The only explanation other than DuGalle being just that gullible and pathetic a leader in spite of his rank is that Duran is influencing his mind. This theory is so widespread that some of the fanbase consider it as good as canon. A good bit of possible Foreshadowing that the fans like to point out is that there are a few times when DuGalle and Duran are talking with one another where Duran's "infested voice" will seep through the cracks.
  • Anticlimax Boss: In mission five of the sixth campaign, you've got two superpowered boss units to fight, each with thousands of HP and powerful attacks. One is a biological ground units, fodder for the Queen's Spawn Broodling which kills it instantly, and the other is an air unit rendered helpless against the Defiler's Dark Swarm.
  • Arc Fatigue: For some, playing through Episodes IV, The Stand, can get a bit tiresome due to the fact that it's another Protoss campaign following Episode III, The Fall. The feeling of being sick of playing Protoss usually starts to hit people part way through Episode IV.
  • Big-Lipped Alligator Moment: Episode III's "The Ambush" cinematic couldn't feel more out-of-place. The clip portrays a group of Protoss warping in to attack a small Terran camp in a barren landscape. However, the actual levels that this cinematic was placed between are two levels established on the ash-world of Char where the Protoss have primarily been fighting the Zerg in an effort to locate Zeratul, and the actual Terran enemy, Duke's outpost, seemed like an afterthought that just happened to be there. The only possible explanation is that Blizzard developed a Protoss vs. Terran cinematic before the game levels were developed, but because the campaign never really pit Terrans against Protoss in the exact setting depicted in the cinematic, they chose to place it after the one time the Protoss fought the Terrans as an enemy in Episode III.
  • Breather Level:
    • "The Reckoning" comes between "To Slay The Beast" and "Omega", both incredibly difficult levels. All you have to do is build up an army strong enough to destroy the Protoss base (which, compared to what you've dealt with up to this point, is tiny) within half an hour, which is easier than it sounds. You start at the top of the tech tree, have two hatcheries to pump out units, enough space to make a third if you want, and the attacks from the UED are so pathetic that you could leave a hydralisk at each entrance and not have to worry about losing a single structure, while the protoss won't counter attack you at all. The only real threat is a carrier and the occasional mind controlling dark archon, which are easily countered.
    • Even "Omega" itself can be considered one - even though it pits you against three enemies (Two Terrans and one Protoss) at the top of their tech tree, your base is simpler to defend and has much more resources compared to "To Slay The Best". The fact enemies don't combine their units makes it even easier.
  • Cliché Storm: While there is a fair amount of Lampshade Hanging, the whole formula still is formulaic/cheesy enough to qualify as one.
  • Complacent Gaming Syndrome: Many players only play Lost Temple, Big Game Hunters, Python and/or Destination. From the user-created side of things, we have Fastest Map Ever, which was designed initially to speed up the beginning game by stacking minerals directly next to the beginning buildings making mining for resource instantaneous. To say that there are several variations of the map would be an Understatement.
  • Crowning Music of Awesome: "Terran 1". The second part in particular is spectacular.
  • Ear Worm: Radio Free Zerg.
    Serve the hive... feel the groove...
  • Ensemble Dark Horse:
    • The zerg Cerebrates have a surprisingly strong fandom for giving the mindless swarm a lot of personality.
    • For a long time leading up to the sequel, there was fans hoping Fenix will be revived a second time, or even infested, and come back for another showing. With no sign of him leading up to Legacy of the Void, hopes shifted to a cameo or a flashback. Ironically the way in which he did "return" caused a Broken Base.
  • Epileptic Trees:
    • Anything at all concerning Duran. The fans have had more than decade to speculate and some very strange, exotic theories have been put forth.
    • Some insist that the factions are expies of the Imperium of Man, Tyranids, and Eldar, and StarCraft is based on 40k. (With 40k being based on numerous Sci-Fi works, it isn't really a surprise.) And the reverse was guessed as well, some claim the Tyranids were changed in appearance to match the Zerg better and that the Tau were based off the Protoss.
  • Even Better Sequel: While the first game was perfectly fine in terms of story and gameplay, it had problems on both fronts. Brood War upped the stakes with a more complex and involving story, as well as more creative and fun missions, and refined the multiplayer gameplay into the titan of RTS gameplay the series is now known for.
  • Germans Love David Hasselhoff: They don't call it the "national sport of South Korea" for nothing.
  • Idiot Plot: Brood War's story boils down to "everyone except Kerrigan acts stupid or short-sighted, and she takes advantage of that to betray and destroy all of them and take control of the Zerg." If the cast had been less trusting of her and Duran, and more trusting of their own established allies and friends, the end of the expansion would be very different.
  • Lady Mondegreen: Not the names in particular, but the quotes units (Mostly Protoss) say get misinterpreted, especially the Khalai language ones.
    • Terran Units
      • Marines: "You want a piece of meat, boy"!
      • Tanks: "Need logic to, sir!"
    • Zerg Units
      • Zerg Guardians might sound like they're saying "Brood War!" once they finish mutating.
      • When Zerg upgrades and research are done, it says "Evolution complete!", but for some, it may sound like "Caboose incomplete!"
      • When Zerg hive clusters are under attack, it could be interpreted as "Die Cloyster is under attack!"
    • Protoss Units
      • Zealot: "My life for hire!", "My wife for hire!", and "I am a fryer/friar!" (My Life for Aiur), as well as "loss of serve" (Khas I Serve).
      • Interesting enough to notice that the spanish dub took "Khas I Serve" as "Thus I serve" therefore translated it to "Así sirvo"
      • Probes and Reavers sound like they're saying "Protoss!" One Probe line sounds like "long ago."
      • One quote the Dragoon says sounds like it's saying "Stop killing us!" (Khalai language), "Galactois" (Khalai Language), and "Thank you something" (Make use of me)
      • Dark Templars sound like they're saying "Yeah squeal!" and "Give voy!"
      • Dark Archons might sound like they're saying "Must inflame us!" (Thoughts in Chaos) and "Old Navy in the way!" (Oblivion awaits)
      • High Templars might have sounded like they say "It's one hell of a party!" (Khassar de Templari),
      • And one of the Archon's select quotes may sound like it's saying "Oh shit!"
      • One of the "attack" quotes of the Scouts sound like it's saying "Lucas sectionized" (Locus acknowledged).
      • Arbiters. Yes. "We are fisherman" (We are vigilant), "Goodnight wing", "In chastity", and "Jikakazoid".
      • Corsairs. "Lettuce attack!" (Let us attack!)
  • Padding: Some missions are obviously there just to fill up the quota of 10/8 missions between the base and expansion campaigns, having little plot development that couldn't have been handled in another mission much more simply. Two such examples are Episode IV Mission 5 and Episode VI Mission 6. The first has the Protoss breaking a UED missile blockade over Braxis, but the UED have nothing to do with the Protoss storyline and are just a distraction keeping them from leaving the planet to continue with their mission. Meanwhile Episode VI Mission 6 has Kerrigan's base on Tarsonis attacked, and the player has to rally and defend themselves and push back the attackers.
    • Ironically, there were two missions cut from Episode I, Biting the Bullet and Operation: Silent Scream because they were seen as this exact reason; especially the former mission. Another reason for the cut was to even out the campaign level totals so that each race was given ten levels.
      • Strangely enough, the omission of Biting the Bullet ended up turning Kerrigan's and Tassadar's first meeting from before she was infested (referenced in The Dark Templar) into a Noodle Incident.
  • Porting Disaster: Starcraft 64, being the only console port of Starcraft I, is generally considered this which is unfortunate because it really was pretty damn good, given the respectable effort to put both the original game and the expansion into a cartridge. Although a LOT of concessions had to be made in order to fit the content that was necessary which is something expected for that console.
    • Video Resolution is only a minuscule 320W-by-240H which really drops the graphics details and makes it harder to keep track of what's happening on the larger maps.
    • The Audio File Library had been modified tremendously: Character Speeches in the Campaign have been dropped for even shorter Textboxes. Sound Effects and Unit Quotes have been cut in length or simply left out. And the Music Tracks have been drastically shortened.
    • There is only Two-Player Competitive or Co-Operative Multiplayer which is further compounded during gameplay by a 320W-by-120H splitscreen.
    • A.I. Opponents play the with the same competency as in the PC-version which makes them far more dangerous.
    • Very few FMV cutscenes have been left in which have been shortened and have unsurprisingly poor quality, making them ambiguous and unreliable for story narraration.
    • Players can select 18 units instead of 12 which is a significant improvement that predates Starcraft II by 10 years.
    • The Control Scheme is both awkward and user-unfriendly: The Analog Stick moves the Cursor slowly and most commands had to be mapped to the C-Buttons as a substitute for Hotkeys, increasing the difficulty of proper and efficient Micro and Macro.
  • Rooting for the Empire: The United Earth Directorate overthrew Mengsk and temporarily dissolved the Dominion, enslaved the Zerg and took control of them, and used their power afterwards to try and take down Kerrigan's Brood. True, they were infesting their own men to use infested terrans as troops against their enemies, were probably planning to exterminate the protoss, and are implied by the lore to be a futuristic version of Nazi Germany. Still, most of their campaign is an eight-mission long bout of "Kick the Son of a Bitch" as they depose Mengsk and kill a lot of zerg, so a lot of fans were on their side and hoped for their return in Starcraft II.
  • That One Level:
    • "Eye for an Eye" can be somewhat tricky due to needing to do a lot of multitasking. The mission comes in two objectives: to not allow a single Dark Templar escape, and to destroy the two Protoss bases. The multitask part comes into play in that the player has to constantly send reinforcements to three separate exit locations to defend against Protoss attacks that are trying to help a Dark Templar escape. At worst, the player will suddenly lose detection at one of the exits without noticing, and not realize that the cloaked Dark Templar has already made it through. And while that's going on, the player also has to continue building up the main base and army to eventually have a large enough strike force that will dispose of the enemy Protoss bases.
    • "Into the Darkness" might as well be known as the Gotcha! level for first timers. It's an installation mission with numerous Infested Terrans, suicide bombers who deal 500 splash damage and can quickly wipe out your army before you even realize they were coming for you, and if one of them hits Tassadar he's probably a goner. Once you know about them and start using Tassadar's Hallucinations as decoys to scout and draw them out, the mission becomes a lot easier, but also a lot longer and boring as you wait for Tassadar's energy to regenerate.
    • "To Chain the Beast" starts off with most of your base surrounded by invincible Sunken Colonies that will shred any ground force you may attempt to put together. At fifteen minutes, just as you're getting your momentum going, the Torrasque spawns, a hero Ultralisk that can single-handedly rip through your entire base, and it might be supported by a Defiler to give it immunity to ranged attacks. And late in the mission, the third Zerg force starts sending Infested Terrans at you. The mission boils down to turtling in your starting base and pouring all your resources into a battlecruiser fleet to try and take down the red Cerebrate to disable the Sunken Colonies. After that the mission lets up a little, but Torrasque and the Infested Terrans are still coming.
    • "To Slay the Beast" is widely considered harder than the final level. Like "To Chain the Beast", you have little breathing room in the beginning and not a lot of resource income. You have enemy bases directly north and east of your starting position, and if you can't take them out early they'll quickly start to snowball you until they're unstoppable. Further, while there are only two enemies forces on the map, the unique feature of the map is that they command both Zerg and Terran forces each, meaning you effectively have to deal with an 800 supply enemy force. The AI is also going to use both races' units liberally, and eventually creates a massive air force of mixed Terran and Zerg forces that will obliterate any counter air force you try, and will do the same to ground units if you don't have Defilers around. Finally, you have to be able to use Dark Templar at all times; if you command none and your Protoss buildings are destroyed, you lose the mission. Such a pity that those buildings are located in the northern part of your base in almost direct fire of enemy attacks. The mission is simply a long, difficult slog as you slowly push the enemy back to the Overmind plateau so you can send in your Dark Templar to kill it.
  • Scrappy Level: Brood War's "The Insurgent" level which many will agree has some of the worst storytelling seen from the original story campaigns. Aldaris' What an Idiot moment aside, the worst of it is actually that players are supposed to believe that not a single rebel Protoss other than Aldaris knew what they were rebelling for.
  • Scrappy Mechanic: With the release of Starcraft II, several old-school mechanics just don't hold up well for some folk when they return to Starcraft I. Particularly:
    • Only being limited to holding 12 units at a time.
    • Units lining up single-file when they walk long distances
    • Not being able to rally workers to mine minerals/gas when they spawn.
    • Ramps in general, especially the ones for the installation missions, which are just too shallow a choke-point to traverse.
    • The pathing in general is very lackluster. Units would have trouble squeezing through small openings and such that the unit would go off in a random direction to try to find a way around. This is usually seen with larger scale ground-units such as Dragoons and Goliaths.
  • Seinfeld Is Unfunny: While still popular, they are definitely areas where the game shows its age, like that most multiplayer matches consist of rushes or unit spams, and most of the campaign missions consist of objectives that always boil down to "destroy the enemy base", which in later missions take up most of the map.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Character:
    • Despite being around since Episode I, Duke's role in the overall story continued to dwindle to the point that many weren't that bummed to see him go when he finally kicked the bucket in "True Colors."
    • Daggoth, the senior Cerebrate to the player in Episode II, gets no screen-time at all afterwards. Only that he led the formation of the Second Overmind in the expansion due to the death of the original Overmind...and yet he doesn't get a single line of dialogue, and takes a Word of God stating that he died to Kerrigan sometime off-screen.
    • The Second Overmind in Brood War has no speaking role whatsoever during the time it was alive. It's there just so that the UED has a means to take control of the Renegade Zerg not controlled by Kerrigan.
  • Tier-Induced Scrappy: Competitively, the Protoss Scout is seen as this for costing too much minerals and gas for the little that it can accomplish; which only sees little use to take down bulky enemy air units.
  • Uncanny Valley: The animated portrait for the Protoss Dragoon gets oddly bizarre ... the dead Protoss warrior ...
  • What an Idiot:
    • DuGalle agrees with Duran's suggestion to blow up the Psi Disrupter rather than use it to cripple the Zerg.
    • Aldaris. Sure...start a revolution. It's not like you can just simply sit down, and talk with Zeratul and company about what you discovered concerning Kerrigan's treachery.
    • Kind of an odd example, but the UED Captain (the player character of Episode V) ends up having a moment like this in the sixth mission "Emperor's Flight." Duran's excuse as to why his forces are out of position is so half-hearted that you would have to be completely retarded to believe that it was an honest mistake. The sad part is that the game implies that the Captain bought it. Alexei is also partially to blame for this as he only tells DuGalle of what Duran pulled in "Emperor's Flight" the moment he takes a fatal bullet from Duran in the next mission.
  • WTH, Casting Agency?: In the original spanish dub, the Dropship pilot, a woman, is dubbed by a man, a fact made stranger by the fact the other female characters are dubbed by women.

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