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Spawn Broodling
What happens when Enemy Summoner meets Chest Burster? A villain that has the ability not only to kill a character but also to generate allies.

This is distinguishable from The Virus in that the Spawn Brooder is not spreading itself, and from Face Full of Alien Wing-Wong in that it is an ability that takes a much shorter amount of time and is generally not considered that sort of attack. See also Flunky Boss, who might use this as an attack, Baleful Polymorph, and The Punishment. Contrast Weaponized Offspring: Weaponized Offspring is about attacking or creating allies by giving birth; this trope is about attacking or creating allies by making the enemy give birth.


Quick and painful examples:

  • Emperor: Battle for Dune has Tleilaxu Leeches, which would spit a parasite onto enemy tanks that would eventually destroy them, creating another Leech. They also had a zombie-like enemy called a Contaminator that would spawn another Contaminator every time they killed an infantry unit.
  • Starcraft: Queens and their Broodlings; the Zerg Queen has an ability called "Spawn Broodling" that kills an enemy unit and creates two Broodlings, similar to Zerglings except in how they are made.
    • Similarly, Brood Lords in StarCraft II "create" Broodlings using their attacks, but that's because they are flinging them into battle.
      • The Heart of the Swarm campaign has two more examples, Corpsers are a variant strain of Roach whose normal attack infects enemy units with a pair of mini-roachlings that burst out when it is killed, and one of Kerrigan's possible abilities allows her to do basically the same thing.
  • Dungeons & Dragons has three Epic Spells: Animus Blast, Animus Blizzard and Demise Unseen.
  • One of the early Looking for Group strips has Richard summoning the skeletons of some enemy soldiers... while the soldiers are still alive.
  • Warhammer 40,000 has the Gift of Chaos/Boon of Mutation (essentially the same ability, but one is Chaos Marine psychic power and the other is a Daemon shooting attack), which attempts to turn the target into a Chaos Spawn (a mindless mass of mutated flesh). The Orks also have a special character that can polymorph an enemy into a Squig. The Tyranids have a special character that can infect units arriving from the reserve, causing them to turn into Ripper Swarms.
    • Warhammer also has a necromancy spell that tears the souls out of the victims and turns them into Spirit Hosts, aswell as a spell availeable to the Daemons that turns enemies into more Daemons.
  • Chryssalids from X-Com: UFO Enemy Unknown.
  • In Devil Survivor, Belzeboul, AKA Beelzebub, can implant his fly eggs in you, which hatch a turn later, and join in.
  • The Magic: The Gathering expansion Rise of the Eldrazi includes a card called "Corpsehatch" that is virtually identical in function to the Trope Namer ability; it kills a creature and creates two Eldrazi Spawn in its place.
    • There's also Skeletonize, which burns away a creature's flesh and (assuming three damage will kill it) leaves behind and undead skeleton under your command.
  • Undead Knights: The entire point of the gameplay is to attack enemy knights and turn them into zombies. You can even work it into your combos to zombiefy them instantly after weakening them.
  • A double-blast of the TMD in Singularity turns an enemy soldier into a ghoul-like monster that hunts by sound. It will usually attack other enemies because they don't know to be quiet. A third blast to the monster will turn it into an Action Bomb.

Slow and painful examples:

  • Dungeons & Dragons: Anything with Spawn, Implant, or Create Attacks; for example, the Slaad and the Marrash.
    • Special mention goes to Extract Water Elemental.
    • Extra special mention goes to the Vargouille.
  • Alien vs. Predator: Xenomorphs of the genetically engineered variety.
  • Warcraft 3 has a few abilities like this (Doom, Parasite, Dark Arrow...), but they create a unit upon death instead of insta-killing.
  • Warhammer Fantasy features the sword of change, a magic blade that can mutate its victims into masses of random Body Horror under partial control of the user. There's also a Skaven spell that changes it's victims into a unit of Clanrats.
  • World of Warcraft has Curse of Doom, essentially the same spell as Doom from Warcraft 3, except it doesn't insta-kill the target, but instead deals large amounts of damage. Should this damage kill the target, it spawns a demon. Death Knights also have a talent that may count: Bloodworms, which causes their melee swings to have a chance of causing worms to burst out of the target and attack it.
  • Guild Wars has a spell (Malign Intervention) that reduces healing, and creates a minion if the target dies while affected.
  • If your GM is cooperative, cast Animate Dead on a carnivorous creature's last meal and see what happens. If all works out, they'll have a zombie in their tummy.
  • Particularly horrific version in Dragon Age: Origins in the form of the Broodmothers. Lets just say that female grey wardens have an even bigger reason for seeking out a quick death on the battlefield than their male counterparts and leave it at that.
  • In Alien Swarm, the parasite enemies will latch onto a player, and the infestation is not cured in time, will exit the host, along with several parasite buddies.
  • In the Homestuck fan adventure Alabaster The Doomed Session, this is a major plot point. One of the main bosses, Vamuin's Denizen, works exactly like this. It is revealed much later in the story.
  • A Real Life example are the Spider Wasps, of the family Pompilidae. The adults, themselves, feed on nectar, but the females hunt down spiders (hence the name), and sting their victims, paralyzing, but not killing them. Once the victim is subdued, the female then drags it back to the nest, and lays a single egg. The egg hatches, and the resulting larva slowly eats the host alive, starting in non-vital regions, then nibbling away until there's nothing left but an empty husk, whereupon the larva pupates. There is one subfamily of spider wasps that prey on other spider wasps, in that the females of this group lay their eggs in another species' nest, whereupon the invading larva first eats the original occupant, then proceeds to eat the original occupant's victim, itself.
    • They're not the only kind of Wasp to do this. Most of those, however, stick to caterpillars which are much easier to catch. Some variants of these will even force the still-barely-alive caterpillars to guard the larvae after they pupate.
    • The emerald jewel wasp goes the extra mile. It poisons a cockroach with a neurotoxin that turns it into an honest-to-god compliant zombie roach and leads it by its own antennae to a secure location and hides it there, where it is slowly eaten alive by the larva inside it.
    • Many kinds of Ichneumon wasp are also parasitoids whose larvae feed on or in the larvae of other insects.
  • A real life example that doesn't involve animal spawn... the cordyceps genus of fungi. They infect various kinds of insect, but the form most often seen by people is one which infects ants and flies and the like. The fungus grows within the body of the host eventually causing death, but before it does so it forces them to climb to a high point (say the top of a blade of grass) and cling there until they die. Then the fungus matures, fruiting bodies sprout from the corpse of the host and spread fungal spores into the surroundings to start the cycle anew. Overlaps with The Virus.

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