YMMV / Roxy Music

  • Americans Hate Tingle: Like a lot of glam bands, Roxy Music had a tough time cracking the American market until "Love is the Drug" became a hit in 1975. Even then, they always had a smaller cult following stateside despite being huge in their native U.K.
  • Awesome Music: Most fans won't dispute that the first five albums count, and Avalon is hailed as a return to form as well.
    • Even though Manifesto and Flesh + Blood are less liked, songs like Angel Eyes, Dance Away, Oh Yeah, Same Old Scene and Over You definitely count as awesome.
  • Broken Base: Between those who only like the band when Brian Eno was in it and dominating the band's sound (a view taken by a biography of the band), those who still like the band from the mid-to-late 70's, when they smoothed out the rougher edges but were still somewhat of a glam rock band, and those who prefer the Avalon era, when the sound was dominated by Bryan Ferry's love of pop and jazz.
  • Creator Backlash: Ferry has mentioned his dislike of first album track "Would You Believe?" in interviews on several occasions. He felt it would make people think the band were some kind of rock and roll revival band.
    • Several band members have said they thought "Pyjamarama" was rushed and a bad choice of single. They liked the song, just thought that the recording and arrangement was not up to scratch due to being tired from touring. They didn't include it on For Your Pleasure for this reason either. This is why, when it came to their first singles collection, they opted to do a remix of it with new sax parts and different stereo effects, and this has appeared on most Greatest Hits compilations since. The original didn't appear on CD until The Thrill Of It All box set, and later on The Complete Studio Recordings. Despite the band's criticisms, "Pyjamarama" is a favourite song of many fans, although many like the remix more than the original.
    • The rest of the group despised Bryan Ferry's electronic instrumentals "Sultanesque" and "South Downs" that he insisted on using as B-sides.
    • Generally speaking the band felt that "Trash" was a bad choice of single as it tried too hard to appeal to a new wave audience, and sold mainly to hardcore fans, who didn't think much of it either. "Trash" is almost never included on hits compilations. Fortunately, the follow ups "Dance Away" and "Angel Eyes" became disco hits and renewed the band's popularity.
  • Ear Worm: "Do The Strand". It will never leave!
  • Face of the Band: Bryan Ferry, to the point where his solo albums were musically interchangeable with the Roxy Music album prior to them. Several compilations collect both and it's not always obvious to the casual listener whether the song is a Roxy Music song or a Ferry solo track. When discussing their early works, Brian Eno is also certain to pop up.
  • Friendly Fandoms: With — rather obviously, after Eno confessed to be a fan of them — Ladytron.
  • Ho Yay: Ferry's solo version of It's My Party uses the original lyrics, referring to a boyfriend Johnny. In interviews, Ferry said he did it primarily to appeal to the band's gay fans.
  • Memetic Mutation: Their appearance on Top Of The Pops with "Virginia Plain" in 1972 has spawned parodies.
  • Older Than They Think: There are a few examples:
    • "Psalm", which wouldn't be recorded until 1973's album "Stranded", is supposedly the first song Bryan Ferry ever wrote as a teenager back in the 1960s, years prior to joining the band.
    • "Grey Lagoons", under the original name "The Bogus Man Part 2", predates the first Roxy Music album and was played on its tour and on some TV appearances. It wasn't however included on it. Whilst logic would imply that "The Bogus Man" was written back then too, there have been no recordings.
    • "The Pride And The Pain" (The B-Side of "Pyjamarama") was an outtake from the group's first album, which bears a striking resemblance to the intro of "Ladytron".
    • The Bryan Ferry solo version of "Casanova" is an outtake from the "Another Time Another Place" sessions, evident from the identical clavinet sound and mix to "The In-Crowd". Not wanting to use two original songs on the (mostly cover) album, the track was saved for Roxy Music's forthcoming "Country Life" LP and rocked up somewhat. The outtake recording was unearthed used as filler on the "Let's Stick Together" compilation in 1976, and later included as the B-Side to "What Goes On" in 1978. The group did not perform "Casanova" live until after their 1979 reunion, and tend to play the arrangement from Ferry's solo version.
    • "Dance Away" and "To Turn You On" were originally outtakes from Bryan's solo album "The Bride Stripped Bare" at the time it was going to be a double. When Roxy reformed, Bryan and the group both felt "Dance Away" could be a hit, so they recorded it for "Manifesto", where it subsequently became their comeback hit. "Flesh + Blood" followed, but in late 1980, Ferry had been remixing some of the outtakes for the planned follow up to "Bride" when the news of John Lennon's death broke. After adding a cover of Lennon's "Jealous Guy" to their live set (which Ferry had wanted to cover for years anyway), they studio recorded it as a one off single. Not having any new Roxy Music tracks to hand, they simply repurposed the mastered solo recording of "To Turn You On" as its B-Side. The track was later released on "Avalon" with some drum machine overdubbed, and despite being 4 years old and featuring a different band, fits quite well.
    • In addition to the above two tracks, "Crazy Love", "Broken Wings", "Feel The Need" and "He'll Have To Go" were also recorded in 1978 for "The Bride Stripped Bare", mixed in 1981, but released on the "Windswept EP" in 1985 except for "He'll Have To Go" on "The Ultimate Collection" in 1988.
    • Ferry's 1986 solo track "Is Your Love Strong Enough" is based on an as yet unreleased "Avalon" outtake.
    • Ferry's solo track "San Simeon" was based on a part of "In Every Dream Home A Heartache" that was cut for making it too long.
  • Recycled Soundtrack: Bryan Ferry's wrote "The Right Stuff" around The Smiths ' instrumental "Money Changes Everything" and then hired Johnny Marr to play on and rework the track properly with him. This is often said to be one factor in the split of The Smiths, though Morrisey had actually stated "For Your Pleasure" as one of his favourite albums.
  • Similarly Named Works: Both Roxy and U2 have had songs called "All I Want Is You".
    • Not only that, but Roxy Music's "Angel Eyes" and Abba's "Angeleyes" were in the charts at the same time. Humorously, the band would later release a single called "Take A Chance With Me", reminding people of "Take A Chance On Me" by Abba. Ferry later released a yet again different solo track called "The Name Of The Game".
    • There's also a song called "The Space Between" on Avalon, unrelated to the song of the same name by Dave Matthews Band.


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