YMMV: Pinball

  • Americans Hate Tingle: Although it has its fans in Japan, the fanbase there is a cult following at best. Pachinko machines, which share a few similarities to pinball, are far more popular there.
  • Crack Is Cheaper: Both the machines themselves and to compete. To buy a brand new Star Trek Standard Edition from Stern would cost as much as buying a PlayStation 4 and 110 games. PAPA tournaments allow players as many attempts for the high scores on the machines as long as they are willing to keep paying the fees, which leads to arms races where players throw large amounts of money into the competition to one-up their rivals. Averted with IFPA tournaments, however, where each player gets a finite amount of tries for a fixed fee. You can try Digital Pinball Tables, including pinball simulator The Pinball Arcade, but playing on a simulation isn't the same as the real thing.
  • Crowning Moment of Awesome:
  • Crowning Music of Awesome: So many, we put them on their own page.
  • Dead Horse Genre: First, it was because video games were cheaper to maintain and took up less space at arcades. Later, as arcades died out, pinball machines all but disappeared. Of all the major pinball machine manufacturers such as Gottlieb, Bally, Williams, etc., only Stern Pinball remains today.
    • It could be argued that pinball has more of a Popularity Polynomial, as it is staging what appears to be somewhat of a revival in the last few years. Second-hand machine prices have surged. As an example, the value of Medieval Madness has gone from about $4,000-$5,000 in 2007 to over $7,000 in 2012. And as of 2013, a new pinball manufacturer, Jersey Jack Pinball, has sprouted up and released their first pinball, based on The Wizard of Oz.
  • Scrappy Mechanic:
    • Outlanes, particularly for beginners; it can seem unintuitive for the ball to slide into an outline, resulting in a drain that seems quite non-preventable. While experts argue that nudging the table can easily prevent an outlane drain, nudging requires knowing exactly when the ball is about to slam into the outlane as well as being delicate with the table; a nudge too weak is the same thing as doing nothing while a nudge too strong is a TILT. However, some tables have "kickbacks" that will eject the ball from an outlane (usually the left one), or other means of catching balls that are about to head into either outlane (such as the Shooting Star in Tales of the Arabian Nights); either way, anti-outlane measures often have limited activations so don't count on them saving you every time.
    • Skill Shots involving flashing lanes at the back of the table are often dismissed for being Luck Shots in practice; even Roger Sharpe admitted that his pinball-saving skill shot was a stroke of luck, i.e. he proved pinball wasn't about luck through sheer luck (pinball tables had been banned in some jurisdictions on accusations of being gambling machines). Even other kinds of plunger-based skill shots can still fall under this trope depending on how well-maintained the plunger is. Perhaps because of this, some tables use flipper-based skill shots instead, where the player has to hit the ball into a designated target with the flippers immediately after launch.
    • Video Modes are seen by some as interrupting the flow of a pinball game and being fairly out-of-place; after all, why play pinball and end up playing a video game? Pat Lawlor, among other pinball creators, is known for refusing to put video modes in tables as a result.