Must Have Caffeine / Real Life

  • When Washington State was deciding on a design for their state quarter, they took in many suggestions from the public. One suggestion was a steaming mug of coffee, from the proliferation of coffee shops in the Seattle area and the frequently gray, cold, and windy weather. Also, even the region's water has measurable levels of caffeine.
  • Stoughton, Wisconsin — a town made up primarily of descendants of Norwegian immigrants — claims to be the birthplace of the coffee break.
  • According to the UnDutchables, the Dutch are a living coffee cult. And no, not for the shops.
  • And in Iceland, too.
  • Richard O'Brien, from The Crystal Maze and The Rocky Horror Picture Show, reportedly had to go to rehab for caffeine overdose.
  • French author Voltaire claimed to drink 72 cups of coffee a day. Even though cups were generally smaller and coffee generally weaker than today, that is one man who loved his coffee. When someone told him that coffee was "a slow poison", Voltaire responded, "It must be slow, for I have been drinking it for sixty-five years and am not dead yet."
  • Surrealist film director David Lynch has his own brand of coffee and reportedly drinks 18 cups a day, whilst practicing transcendental meditation. This may explain a thing or two about his work...
  • One theory for the origin of the term "cup of Joe" is that it was named for Secretary of the US Navy, Admiral Josephus Daniels, who abolished the officers' wine mess in 1914, after which coffee was the drink of choice on navy ships.
  • During the American Civil War, if Union soldiers didn't have time to make coffee many of them would suck on the grounds just to get the taste. Soldiers of both sides who weren't that lucky (if shipments were disrupted) experimented with chicory, roasted dandelion roots, burned nutshells...
    • Coffee had a major role in the Civil War for both sides.
    • There were many cases where the armies of either side were camped close enough together that the outer pickets could talk with each other. When that happened, illicit trading often took place. One of the most common trades was tobacco (Grown in the South) for coffee (Shipped in by Northern trading companies). There's also the "ranger dip", where the powdered instant coffee that's in almost every MRE is placed in the mouth like a dip of tobacco, in order to keep awake.
  • U.S. President Theodore Roosevelt was a teetotaller, but he was said to drink at least a gallon of coffee on a slow day. He coined the Maxwell House Coffee slogan "Good to the last drop". Seeing as Roosevelt suffered from asthma, and caffeine, being a vasodilator, is a reasonably good remedy for it (especially in an era without modern inhaler medication), the president was likely self-medicating.
  • Musician Frank Zappa's drugs of choice were caffeine and nicotine.
  • John Lennon liked Gitane cigarettes and "down and dirty black, black coffee" according to Rolling Stone.
  • Mike Patton of Faith No More wrote one song about sleep deprivation after subjecting himself to staying awake for three days in a row, aptly named "Caffeine". He claimed around the time that he doesn't drink alcohol, but drinks 8 cups of coffee a day.
  • Dave Grohl, while in-studio with Them Crooked Vultures. FRESH POOOTS! Unfortunately this landed him in the hospital with heart palpitations, though Dave didn't take long to make fun of himself about it.
  • In one of his commentaries for Dilbert, Scott Adams claims that he once accidentally drank decaf one morning and thought he was sick.
  • Professional wrestlers are generally big time coffee drinkers. The Ultimate Warrior and Randy Savage were among the biggest consumers. The Warrior claims that before their match at Wrestlemania VII, they consumed a combined five gallons.
  • Robert Downey, Jr. says that he has been known to wake up, do a triple shot of espresso, and then head back to bed.
  • A link on the right side of the Hyperbole and a Half homepage is an enthusiastic plug for a coffee shop, which supposedly named a blend after the author.
  • Good Eats host Alton Brown is a self-described coffee aficionado (among other things), dedicated at at least two entire shows to it (one for coffee, one for espresso). People have often commented on the very large amount of coffee he uses just for a standard cup. Alton argues that the more coffee you use the less bitter the brew is.
  • Pope Clement VIII probably helped the Christian world accept it with his coffee blessing. He was a scholar too, and wasn't about to give up his 3 a.m. joe just because some stuffy old redhats said it was an Islamic thing and therefore non-Christian.
  • Cambridge computer engineers invented the webcam...so they could see from their workstations whether or not the pot in the coffee room was full.
  • David Foster Wallace was apparently fond of putting tea bags in hot coffee for extra flavor and kick.
    Det. Harris. Tea... and coffee? That makes it — toffee!
  • Britney Spears indicated in her Hawaiian special, she's very fond of having Mocha coffees in the morning when she works. She's also almost the unofficial spokesperson for Starbucks she's seen walking away from there so often, on working and non-working days.
  • Neil Young was a Starbucks supporter until Starbucks became involved in a lawsuit to stop a Vermont law that requires GMO foods to be labeled. He says he'll forego his morning latte until they come clean about their involvement. He even wrote a song about it: "A Rock Star Bucks A Coffee Shop".
  • John Flansburgh and John Linnell of They Might Be Giants are well-known coffee addicts.
  • American Naval officer and historian Samuel Eliot Morison famously said "The Navy could probably win a war without coffee but it wouldn't like to try."
  • During a recent appearance on deadmau5' informal "coffee run" video series, Toronto Mayor Rob Ford ordered a quintuple espresso. Even Deadmau5/Joel, who usually orders an extra large and has been known to quaff several Coca-Colas during studio sessions, was amazed.
  • Alexander Hamilton was probably the first, if not earliest, recorded case of extreme caffeine addiction: He drank 10 cups of black coffee a day. One must wonder how bad it was to have his severe insomnia and hyperactivity.
  • In Game 7 of the 2015 conference semifinals, Matthew Dellavedova of the Cleveland Cavaliers supplemented his usual pre-game coffee with half-time coffee to spur a depleted Cavs team to victory.
  • Probably the most serious political crisis in the GDR after the 1953 revolts and before the events that led to its fall was related to coffee. that other wiki has an article on it (in German). Basically, the GDR ran out of hard currency to buy coffee at a time when the world market prices hit a new high. As Saxony (than as now the culturally dominant region of East Germany) was renowned for its "coffee culture" centuries before the GDR rolled around, this became Serious Business. On no other topic did the GDR government ever get so many letters of complaint. And we are talking about a regime that most of the time had a shortage of decent housing. Eventually the GDR resolved the problem by helping Vietnam (which up to that point had no coffee culture or cultivation whatsoever) become the second largest coffee producer in the world.
  • The common Finnish army slang word for coffee is petroli ("kerosene"), implying coffee is basically to the men the same as what fossil fuels are for the machinery.
  • Heavy coffee drinkers undergoing surgery may wake up with a massive headache, as a reaction to the anesthetic; so it's not uncommon for caffeine to be added to their IV, in order to lessen the reaction.

http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/MustHaveCaffeine/RealLife