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Necktie Headband

That's no overreaction. Plumbing is very demanding work.

Exactly What It Says on the Tin: someone wearing a necktie around the head as an improvised Martial Arts Headband.

A trope often associated with salarymen and other corporate types whose business clothes come with a necktie. Sometimes they get overenthusiastic during an after-work party, or they get involved in Serious Business that justfies dropping the Dress Code.

In real life, most specifically in the hard drinking context, this custom comes from a drunken guy's ostensibly failed attempt to take off his necktie, which remains wrapped around his head for the rest of the party after they forget the matter or quit trying due to alcohol-numb fingers.

Sister Trope to Lampshade Wearing.


Examples:

Advertising
  • A 1999 This Is SportsCenter ad had anchors discussing a test of their Y2K emergency procedures. The test goes less than optimally as chaos in the offices break out. The kicker, though, is Charlie Steiner shoving his face into the camera, wearing a necktie on his head and holding a latern while shouting, "Follow me! Follow me to freedom!"

Anime and Manga
  • Oji "Gabriel" Tanaka does this when playing guitar in the early episodes of The Legend of Black Heaven. Later on, he just takes the tie off.
  • Vash the Stampede does this a couple times in both versions, when he gets down to some serious drinking. We never see the tie otherwise—he seems to only pull it out for this purpose.
  • Discussed in Lucky Star
  • Seen on a horde of drunken salarymen in Peepo Choo.
  • Worn by Bradley in an omake of Fullmetal Alchemist parodying the bit where he turns out not to be dead.

Film

Live-Action TV

Videogame
  • In Osu! Tatakae! Ouendan, the salaryman dons a neckie headband to get ready for a showdown with a giant mouse monster.

Web Comic

Western Animation

Real Life
  • At at least one factory in the US, labor union representatives wore their neckties on their heads to a meeting with Japanese executives overseeing the plant to show their willingness to stand for their positions.