Magazine: Time Magazine

Time is an American weekly news magazine founded in 1923 and read across the entire world. It has international editions for Europe, Asia and Canada and an edition for children. It focuses on politics, culture, social changes, sport, fashion, economics and other current events.

The magazine is best known for electing an annual "Person of the Year". Since 1999, they also elect an annual list of the 100 most influential people of the year.

See also: Time All Time 100 Albums.

Time provides examples of:

  • But Not Too Evil: Khomeini was the last controversial person to be elected "Man of the Year" in 1979. Due to public backlash, Time became more careful not to elect people that are too "evil" in the public eye, even though later winners like George W. Bush and Vladimir Putin could hardly be considered free from controversy either.
  • Cosmetic Award: The "Person of the Year" election is often seen as a badge of honor, not being connected to any kind of a financial reward. Except that's not the magazine's intent.
  • Men Are Generic, Women Are Special: The only women to specifically win the "Person of the Year" election have been "The Whistleblowers" (Cynthia Cooper, Coleen Rowley and Sherron Watkins, in 2002) and Melinda Gates (jointly with Bill Gates and Bono, in 2005). Before that, four women were granted the title as individuals, as "Woman of the Year" Wallis Simpson (1936), Soong May-ling (1937), Queen Elizabeth II (1952) and Corazon Aquino (1986). "American Women" were recognized as a group in 1975. Other classes of people recognized comprise both men and women, such as "Hungarian Freedom Fighters" (1956), "U.S. Scientists" (1960), "The Inheritors" (1966), "The Middle Americans" (1969), "The American Soldier" (2003), "You" (2006) and "The Protester" (2011, represented on the cover by a woman).
  • We All Live in America: Despite trying to maintain a cosmopolitan image and being read across the entire world the magazine sometimes focuses too much on topics that only Americans would consider to be interesting.
    • Since 1996 most people elected to be "Person of the Year" have been Americans. The magazine even went so far to name "The American Soldier" "Person of 2003", despite the fact that the Americans weren't the only troops fighting in Afghanistan and Iraq. So far, the only exceptions have been Irishman Bono (2005), Russian Vladimir Putin (2007) and Pope Francis (2013), not counting general winners like "You" (2006) and "The Protester" (2011).
    • When Time tried to elect the "Person of the Century" in 1999 there was criticism that too many names were Americans, and not only that, some of them were solely important to the U.S.A. itself, not the world in general.