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Literature: The Waste Land
April is the cruellest month, breeding
Lilacs out of the dead land, mixing
Memory and desire, stirring
Dull roots with spring rain.

The Waste Land is T. S. Eliot's most famous poem, as well as the most famous Modernist poem. It is mainly about how the world is hopelessly lost and how life cannot be regenerated. It is also incredibly confusing. Full text here

Not to be confused with The Waste Lands, the third book in Stephen King's The Dark Tower series. (Though the book makes open references to the poem.)

This work contains examples of:

  • All There in the Manual - Eliot's annotations. Except that they just raise further questions.
  • The Annotated Edition - Provided by Eliot himself.
  • Arc Words - "Unreal City," "fear death by water," and "HURRY UP PLEASE ITS TIME," to name but a few.
  • As the Good Book Says
  • Bilingual Bonus - There are some lines that are in German, French, and Italian, and some Sanskrit words.
    • The Latin epigraph translates to: Once with my own eye I saw the Sybil of Cumae, hanging in a jar, and the boys were saying to her: "What is it you desire?" She responded, "I wish to die."
      • Oh, and the dialogue there is in Greek.
  • Bread, Eggs, Milk, Squick - The narrator in the first "Unreal City" section talking to Stetson. "That corpse you planted last year in your garden..."
    • Perhaps not as squicky as it first appears; "That Corpse" might refer to the Corpse Flower, whose fragrance resembles rotting meat.
    • Though, considering that he just mentioned the battle of Mylae...
    • The narrator of the first section of A Game Of Chess suggests this agenda: "The hot water at ten. / And if it rains, a closed car at four. / And we shall play a game of chess, / pressing lidless eyes and waiting for a knock upon the door."
  • Breaking the Fourth Wall - When he calls out to the "hypocrite reader" in Gratuitous French.
  • Casanova Wannabe: The house agent's clerk in The Fire Sermon.
  • Catch Phrase - HURRY UP PLEASE ITS TIME.
  • City Noir - Unreal City
  • Crapsack World - It is The Waste Land after all.
  • Creator Breakdown - Both he and his wife suffered nervous breakdowns during the writing of this poem, hence it is no wonder it is so confusing.
  • Dead Person Conversation - With Stetson. Tiresias also mentions doing this during his career as a Hellenic mystic.
  • Emotionless Girl - The typist home at teatime.
  • Expy - In his annotations, Eliot mentions the three Thames-daughters, who are expies of the Rhine-maidens from the Götterdämmerung.
  • Gratuitous French, Gratuitous German, Gratuitous Italian, and gratuitous Sanskrit.
  • Hermaphrodite - Tiresias.
  • Historical-Domain Character: Marie, Countess Larisch from the beginning of The Burial of the Dead.
    • She had become notorious a couple of decades earlier as the go-between for Austro-Hungarian Crown Prince Rudolf and Baroness Marie Vetsera. After the Mayerling incident, she was essentially frozen out of Vienna society and went into self-imposed exile. She met Eliot in 1911 (or 1914 according to some sources) and the lines in Burial of the Dead are said to be taken nearly verbatim from her remarks during their conversation.
  • Intrepid Merchant - Phlebas the Phoenician and Mr. Eugenides, sort of.
  • Ironic Echo - Some of the allusions, like all that nightingale business. Also some internal examples, like "death by water" and the "pearls that were his eyes".
    • The Burial of the Dead's "know[ing] nothing" is echoed in A Game of Chess.
  • Lampshade Hanging - "The fragments I have shored against my ruins," at the end of the poem; referring to fragmented sentences he put before this line. Also, the second part of The Burial of the Dead mentions "a heap of broken images"— like the poem itself.
  • Law of Inverse Fertility: Lill from the end of A Game of Chess.
  • Literary Allusion Title - Parts three and five are allusions to Buddhist works, and part one to the Book of Common Prayer.
  • Lying Creator
  • Mind Screw
  • Narrative Poem
  • Public Domain Character -Tiresias and the Fisher King.
  • Rule of Three - The three of staves is one of the tarot cards drawn, the Fisher King appears three times in the poem, there are the three Thames-daughters, the thunder strikes three times.
  • Sliding Scale of Idealism Versus Cynicism - Way towards the cynical end.
    • Though it can be argued that the cynicism is moderated, to an extent, by the ending stanzas of the last canto, What The Thunder Said, in which Eliot proposes three virtues (using one of the most famous sections of the Upanishads) - charity, mercy and self-control - as means of escaping the sterile Waste Land of modern civilization.
  • Sophisticated as Hell - All these different linguistic registers in one poem.
  • Shout-Out - It even ends with a massive list of all of its allusions.
  • Tarot Motifs - Specifically in the third vignette of part one. (Though some of the cards it mentions aren't actually in the Arcana. Eliot acknowledges this in the annotations, of course.)
  • The Ingenue - The hyacinth girl, at first.
  • Written Sound Effect "jug jug," "twit twit twit," "co co rico," etc.
  • Viewers Are Geniuses - See "Shout-Out".
  • World of Symbolism

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alternative title(s): The Waste Land
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