Fridge / Stargate

This page is for the 1995 film. For the fridge pages of its spinoffs, see Stargate SG-1, Stargate Atlantis, or Stargate Universe.

Fridge Brilliance
  • When Jackson is packing away his books, the camera focuses on one titled "Egypt Before the Pharaohs". The sculpture on cover looks rather similar to a goa'uld.
    • Given what we learn about the goa'uld and jaffa in the series, Ra having two First Primes styled after a jackal and a hawk seems all kinds of wrong... until you remember that Ra was the goa'uld emperor at the time, so he might have given himself two First Primes as a show of superiority, and then styled his own underlings like Anubis and Heru-ur (other rival goa'uld themselves) probably to mock them.
      • There were multiple Horus guards, in one scene Anubis (originally intended to be the Anubis) is flanked by two of them.
    • The massive, massive changes in personality between this movie's O'Neil (one L) and the series' O'Neill (two Ls) are neatly explained by how he was going through suicidal depression at the time of the movie (which is the reason he was chosen for the mission in the first place). By the end of the movie, if you're playing close attention, he seems to be starting to turn (back) into his (presumably natural) wise-cracking self, first with the "How ya doin'? *wink*" and then with the Pre-Mortem One-Liner he gives the First Prime.
    • Presumably, his wise-crackng is a coping mechanism developed when he was in the Special Forces.
    • Ra's guards weren't Jaffa. Their outfits expose their midrifts. Since they don't sound like goa'uld they must be sarcophagus-using elite humans.
    • The series also reveals that, long before the film takes place, Ra had defeated and (presumably) killed the Goa'uld Anubis, a Goa'uld so evil the other Goa'uld thought he was an asshole. Ra may have kept one of his personal guard with an Anubis helm to remind everyone else that he was the guy who took down the scariest System Lord ever, and so was not someone to screw around with.

Fridge Logic
  • The coordinate system Daniel explains in the film is unlikely to function. It's based on the idea of lines of position crossing to form a fix. On a 2D map, if you can draw a line that you're definitely on, say, between two mountain peaks, and you can draw another line between two towers that you happen to be between, you are where the lines cross. It also works on the surface of 3D objects, like Earth's surface. But when you can move freely in 3D space, that system breaks down. It works if you can pick four points that all lie on the same plane, but even if you carefully pick 38 naturally occurring points (the number of symbols on the gate minus the point of origin), it's unlikely you could navigate this way. And if you can't make a fix using two lines of position, a third won't help. A more reliable system would take 38 pulsars from around the galaxy and give them each a unique symbol. Each symbol also corresponds to a number. You could then address any point in space with a 6 symbol code like this: The first symbol names a pulsar. The second is the azimuth from that pulsar expressed as one of 38 directions around the compass on the plane of the galaxy's disc, with the galaxy's center as direction 1. The third is an azimuth on a plane perpendicular to the galaxy's plane on that first line, with the first line as direction 1. Do it again from a different pulsar for symbols 4, 5 and 6 and you have narrowed down the whole galaxy into a reasonably small area where logically only one gate could exist. The "point of origin" is a procedural sign that tells the gate to dial that address. It would work like a 3D VOR system. If there is a gate in the addressed area, a connection is made. If not, or if the address isn't a valid address (the lines don't cross) no connection is made. Even more likely is that it's just a discretely assigned address like a phone number.
    • And even if you could designate a planetary co-ordinate using intersecting lines drawn from star constellations (which you can't), how can three intersecting lines from constellations in our galaxy take you to a planet on the other side of the universe?
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Fridge/Stargate