Fridge: Fallout

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The Fallout Universe
  • The computers look ancient. Completely out of place for the time setting, considering the advanced functions they do in the games. The Fallout universe has nuclear power at the forefront of the societies energy source. EMP's are the result of nuclear missiles being detonated above ground. The intense radio waves they produce destroys modern computer architecture. Older computers that would have been made in the 1950's would have survived, as their architecture (vacuum tubes, rather than silicon transistors) is more resistant to radio wave damage.
  • Fifties:
    • It seems odd that the world of Fallout was stuck in the 50s. But this is a world that runs by 50s science. It's not stuck in the 50s, it practically IS the 50s!
    • It also gives you a good idea as to why the Pre-War world fell. They took an attitude of "if it ain't broke, don't fix it". But when it did start to break, they were so stuck in a cultural rut that they refused to adapt, even as their world started to crumble around them. The world was stuck in the 50's not just because it worked on the 50's mass-idea of science, but because they refused to change. What else refuses to change? War. The lesson? Societies need to adapt and change in their modes of thought and how they see the world, or they will become stagnant and destroy themselves.
  • Fallout is basically a combination of what the future was to people in the 50s (ray guns and cheesy-looking robots) and their greatest fears (a nuclear holocaust). The weapons changed to meet the expectation of the future while many of the appliances (radios, soda machines, refrigerators) stayed the same as in the mid to late 50s. We're playing the same thing that was Nightmare Fuel for someone living in the Cold War.
  • It seems kind of strange that Unarmed would be governed by Endurance instead of Strength, like Melee is. However, having a higher Damage Threshold (which is also tied to Endurance) means that the impact would be less likely to cause damage to the puncher himself, so it's an interesting example of a Required Secondary Power.
  • The back story says that in the years leading up to the war, all the fossil fuels on Earth were used up, and the subsequent collapse of global economies and the scramble for resources was one of the driving factors behind the Great War. This explains a lot about the setting. Why are cars nuclear powered? No oil for fuel. Why is everything glass and metal? Because you can't make plastics without oil.
  • Garden of Eden Creation Kit : a Garden of Eden in a cellular automaton is a configuration that can't be created following the automaton's rules ; considering Fallout is basically a playable cellular automaton, how can you really have that in a kit?
  • It seems odd that people would be so cheerful about the Old World, but it's safe to assume most people can't read, and that oral tradition would deteriorate. Political tensions and the New Plague have no meaning to them; the only things that have any meaning to the people of the Wasteland is how big and (relatively) safe the cities were... How kids could play in the streets of D.C. and this strange thing called "grass." Even the Lone Wanderer is probably waxing nostalgic about it due to Vault 101's Patented Propaganda Process. This explains why Ulysses in Fallout: New Vegas, one of the few people who has actually studied history, hold House and his plan to revive the Old World in such contempt. To Ulysses, House and the Old World are both ghosts that need to die.
  • Why can you read copies of the same skill book and get a skill bonus every time? If you've already read it multiple times, what else can you learn? But those books are over 200 years old. They are probably badly damaged, missing pages, or have unreadable text. It also stands to reason that each copy is missing different information (for example, let's say that one copy is missing pages 101 to 116 and another copy has those but is missing pages 13-54). So when you read multiple copies of the same skill book, you are actually just piecing together a complete book out of the fragments you have. It makes more sense for the works that are periodicals, since you're reading a different month of, say, the DC Journal of Internal Medicine or Grognak the Barbarian.
  • The Nightkin, the Master's special agents, are deep purple. While this makes sense on a topical level, as their dark coloration makes them hard to see in the dark, one must remember that Super Mutants are basically orcs. Purple iz da sneakiest color!