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Film: Killing Them Softly
Don't rip off poker games. It's bad for business.

Killing Them Softly is a 2012 crime film starring Brad Pitt, Ray Liotta, Richard Jenkins, and James Gandolfini, and written & directed by Andrew Dominik (who'd worked with Pitt on The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford).

When a mob poker game run by Markie Trattman (Liotta) is held up by two masked gunmen, suspicion immediately falls on Trattman. And with good reason: years ago, he'd actually ripped off his own game, then drunkenly copped to it - to the amusement of his fellow wiseguys. This time, feeling that not punishing the robbers would be bad for business, hitman Jackie Cogan (Pitt) is called in. Although Jackie deduces almost immediately that Trattman isn't stupid enough to hit his own game twice, he still decides to make an example of Trattman. Jackie also quickly uncovers the real culprit — but since they actually know each other, he decides to subcontract that hit to Mickey (Gandolfini), who turns out to be a bitter drunk more interested in working his way through every prostitute in town.


This film provides examples of:

  • Billing Displacement: The ads only gave Scoot McNairy and Ben Mendelsohn fourth and fifth billing respectively despite their actions driving the plot. The actual film fixes this, as they are billed second and third (though top-billed Brad Pitt still is displaced, as his character doesn't show until more than a half-hour in).
  • Boom, Headshot
  • Bothering by the Book: Mickey explains to Jackie that before coming to Boston, he killed someone from the wrong jurisdiction and, per the family's rules, he's only "allowed" to take on one of Jackie's two planned killings. Of course, Mickey isn't actually trying to be subversive; he's just lazy.
  • Cloud Cuckoo Lander: New York Mickey has simply run out of fucks to give. His appetite for booze and women is matched only by his taste for rambling, incoherent soliloquies.
  • Cluster F-Bomb
  • Cool Gun: Averted. Russell shows up for the poker-game heist with a sawed-off shotgun that's SO sawed-off, the shells are poking out the ends of the barrels.
  • Damn It Feels Good to Be a Gangster: Averted. The film goes out of its way to show that gangsters, once the embodiment of free living, are now just business men, complete with budget restrictions and public relations. Hitmen are not mythic badasses and its clear that the mob has fallen very far from the days when they reigned supreme.
  • Destination Defenestration: When Dillon and Kenny rough up Trattman after the first poker-game heist, they slam him through a window, pull him back in, then toss him out the back door. Later, after Jackie shoots him, Trattman's car rolls into an intersection and is struck by a truck, causing Trattman's head to smash into the windshield.
  • Even Evil Has Standards: Jackie is visibly disturbed when Mickey threatens a hooker.
  • Hookers and Booze: What Mickey would rather do than prepare for his hit.
  • Meaningful Background Event: The movie takes place during the last days of the 2008 Obama/McCain presidential campaigns, as well as the USA's financial meltdown. The last scene appears to coincide with Obama's victory.
    • This may be the very first crime film where mobsters are constantly watching C-SPAN.
  • No-Holds-Barred Beatdown: Two mooks deliver one to Trattman. Later, Jackie and Driver admit they may have been a bit excessive.
  • No Name Given: Driver, Jackie's liason with the local mob.
  • Not So Different: The most frightening part of Mickey's emotional breakdown is the implication that just a couple years ago, he was quite similar to Jackie himself.
  • Oh, Crap: Trattman's expression after Jackie pulls up next to his car, gun drawn.
  • Orcus on His Throne: Mickey. Easier to swallow than most examples of the trope because rather than being used to spackle up a plot hole, here Mickey's unwillingness to do any real work is used to illustrate just how far organized crime has fallen.
  • Professional Killer: Both Jackie and Mickey. One more so than the other...
  • Punch Clock Villain: Both Jackie and Mickey, but especially Driver, who looks and acts like an office clerk.
  • Sawed-Off Shotgun: Taken Up to Eleven by one character. The gun in question is shorter than the shells it's loaded with.
  • Shoot the Shaggy Dog: The cliff's notes: some guys rob a mob game, get found out immediately and killed. Except one of them gets arrested instead.
  • Slow Motion: Russell, high on heroin.
  • Smash to Black: The film ends with Jackie demanding that Driver pay him his full fee, rather than a discounted total for three rub-outs.
  • Stupid Crooks: The robbers who kick off the plot.
  • Title Drop: Jackie prefers to "kill 'em softly" (i.e. from a distance), rather than up close, so as not to deal with the panicked victim begging for his life.
  • Too Dumb to Live: The two dimwits hired to rob the poker game.
    • Especially Russel, who makes his accomplice look like Meyer Lansky. Ironically, Russel is the only surviving participant in the heist by the end of the film.
  • When It Rains, It Pours
  • You Have Outlived Your Usefulness: When Mickey proves to be unable to carry out his hit, Jackie has him arrested on a parole-violation beef and Put on a Bus.
    • Frankie shows Jackie to Squirrel, and once Jackie's killed Squirrel, he proceeds to kill Frankie as well.


John Dies at the EndFilms of the 2010sLa Revolucion Es Un Sueno Eterno

alternative title(s): Killing Them Softly
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