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Film: Casino Royale

The one where it all begins — again.

The 21st film in the EON productions' James Bond film franchise and third adaptation of the James Bond novel Casino Royale. Ian Fleming had sold the rights to the novel separately from the rest of the series, which is the reason that it took so long for a proper adaptation of it.

The movie is essentially a Continuity Reboot for the franchise, serving as an Origins Episode of how Bond acquired his license to kill and became the Tuxedo and Martini Badass he is today. Due to Comic Book Time however, it is still officially part of the same series.

In the film's expanded first half, Bond earns his 00 status and tracks down a terrorist financier known only as Le Chiffre. In the second half, adapted from Fleming's original novel, Bond must win a high-stakes game of poker against Le Chiffre to bankrupt the criminal and turn him against his terrorist clients. Along the way, Bond is nearly killed twice, gets tortured by Le Chiffre, and falls in love with the gorgeous accountant in charge of staking him in the game, Vesper Lynd.

The film also features several changes to the original novel in its second half: The card game goes from Baccarat to Texas Hold 'Em Poker, the time period from the 1950s to the 2000s, the setting from France to a newly-independent Montenegro, and Bond from a Super OCD Shell-Shocked Veteran to a Wisecracking Sociopath, which makes the torture scene a different affair altogether. Lastly, the film exchanges Vesper's quiet final scenes and a long discussion between Bond and Mathis on the nature of evil for an action packed showdown in the grand canals of Venice.

Casino Royale was noted for being Darker and Edgier than the previous films, with the fight scenes brutal and bloody, and the story hewing closer to a political thriller about tracking down the cash flow of terrorist organizations than an adventure yarn about a superhero secret agent saving the world from megalomaniacs using Underwater Bases, Kill Sats and pilfered nuclear weapons.

Followed by Quantum of Solace, one of the few direct sequels in the Bond film franchise.

Under absolutely no circumstances should you confuse this with the 1967 film of the same title.


This film provides examples of:

  • 10-Minute Retirement: Bond sends in his resignation, but the death of Vesper makes him reconsider, keeping him at Her Majesty's service.
  • Agents Dating: Bond and Vesper Lynn break the tension between the Absurdly High-Stakes Game of Texas Hold'Em. By the end, he's ready to retire and stay with her. Turns out she's The Mole.
  • All Girls Want Bad Boys: Deconstructed with Solange, who married Dimitrios and suffered through a loveless, unhappy marriage. Out of spite, she hooks up with Bond, lamenting as she does that she had "so many chances to be happy" with "nice guys" but keeps on being drawn to "bad men" like them instead. Later in the film, her association with the man who helped orchestrate the bomb plot (Dimitrios) and the man who foiled it (Bond) are what gets her tortured to death.
  • Annoying Arrows: A nailgun version, after killing Gettler, Bond pulls out a nail in his back.
  • Badass:
    • Daniel Craig's version of Bond is remorseless when he kills, which becomes a theme in the film. He can also apparently smash his way through drywall and takes a nail gun to his shoulder without even a grimace. Which is quite accurate to Ian Fleming's original novel version.
    • Also, the acrobatic bomber (Sebastian Foucan) who Bond chases in Madagascar. Actually, in this movie a great number of the villains, if not all of them, are this. They lose against Bond, all right, but at least they fight.
  • Badass in a Nice Suit: Particularly in the film's final scene.
  • Bilingual Bonus: At the end of the embassy shootout, an official tells James "laissez tomber" in unsubtitled French (though it sounds like he could also be saying "Listen to me!" in English), this phrase in French translates literally to English as "Let it fall!" but colloquially as "Give up!"
  • Bond Gun Barrel: The movie plays with this bit; a part of the actual narrative becomes the "Bond Shooting At A Gun Barrel's POV" scene.
  • Break the Cutie:
    • Bond in the chair with no bottom. Bond being heartbroken after Vesper's death, and that causes Bond's depression and weariness seen in most of Quantum of Solace.
    • Vesper as well.
  • Briefcase Full of Money:
    • The money the African "freedom fighters" give Le Chiffre at the beginning.
    • The poker winnings - although initially, it is a 'briefcase full of computer for transferring money', but the trope is definitely being invoked. (Later, Mr White casually takes a real briefcase full of $100+ million away after the building collapses.)
  • Broken Ace: Bond
  • Byronic Hero: Bond
  • Bulungi: In Madagascar, Bond storms the embassy of a fictional country named "Nambutu".
  • The Cameo: In the Miami airport scene, look very closely at who is in the metal detection scanner opposite the Skyfleet plane. Richard Branson decides to make an appearance.
    • Earlier in Nassau, Bond exchanges appreciative glances with a sexy tennis player - Victoria's Secret model Alessandra Ambrosio.
  • The Can Kicked Him: Bond's first murder was in a bathroom in a Paris subway.
  • California Doubling: All scenes that take place in Montenegro and United States (except the actual airport runways) are actually shot in Czech Republic (that is located in different climatic zone than Montenegro and Florida). Also, Madagascar in the opening is the Bahamas.
  • Can't Kill You, Still Need You: Obanno is extremely angry at Le Chiffre for losing his money in the foiled attack at Miami, attacking him in his Montenegro hotel room. He tells Le Chiffre "I would take your hand, but you need it to play poker.", and briefly threatens Le Chiffre's girlfriend.
  • Cartwright Curse: The original.
  • Cat Smile: Valenka (Le Chiffre's girlfriend).
  • Chase Scene: Played straight with the Parkour scene, but subverted for the car chase: When Bond rushes out in his fancy modified Aston-Martin after the people who kidnapped Vesper, he's almost immediately driven off the road by them dropping her in the center of the road. He is summarily captured. (This is taken directly from the book; all that's changed is the model of car.)
  • Chekhov's Gun:
    • Near the beginning is a scene with Le Chiffre playing poker. "I have only 2 pair, and you have a full 17.4% chance of completing your straight". Guess what happens during the big poker game... (Le Chiffre actually gets a Full House, aces full of sixes, and Bond actually gets a straight flush, the probability of which is much lower than getting a regular straight.)
    • Early in the movie, The Bombmaker gets spooked when he sees one of the British agents holding a finger to his ear, giving away that he was using an earpiece. Later on, when Bond and Vesper are trying to evade a pair of bad guys via Fake-Out Make-Out, one of the bad guys notices the earpiece that Bond was using to listen in on Le Chifre with.
    • Chekhov's Armoury: The scene where Bond looks through the secret compartments in his car is a more low-key version of the traditional "Pay attention, 007. You'll be needing all of these gadgets before the film is over" scene.
    • Chekhov's Gunman: When Bond improvises his Drink Order (for what more dedicated fans will know is a Vesper Martini), numerous other players ask for the same thing. Only one player changes anything about the order, telling the barman to prepare his martini without the fruit. He later reveals himself as James Bond's brother from Langley.
  • Chess Motifs: Variation, with casino and poker motifs.
  • City of Canals: Including a scene where Bond sinks a floating building.
  • The Commies Made Me Do It: The post-Soviet version. Vesper Lynd turns out to be working for the bad guys because they have her boyfriend hostage.
  • Cool Car:
    • Just look at Bond's Aston! Just freaking look at it! Even if it was completely stock it would still be gorgeous!
    • And the older Aston that Bond runs into isn't half bad either.
  • Cold-Blooded Torture: Pretty disturbing especially for a Bond movie.
  • Continuity Reboot: The movie did this to the Bond movie franchise. Though they also have claimed in secondary material that it's a Prequel. It retains some Broad Strokes, keeping Judi Dench as M and the post-Cold War scenario from the Pierce Brosnan films, though now she misses the Cold War, when agents had the decency to defect after a big mistake, rather than seeing Bond as a relic of that era.
  • Consummate Professional: Daniel Craig's interpretation of Bond... even when he's shooting up embassies.
  • Cool Clear Water: During the final action sequence, the water has the clarity of a swimming pool, when in reality, it should be murky, seeing as how a building (and one under construction, no less), just collapsed into it.
  • CPR (Clean, Pretty, Reliable): At the end, Bond isn't so much trying to restore circulation as getting one last grope of Vesper's rack.
  • Cosmopolitan Council: The players at the high-stakes poker game.
  • Covert Pervert: Vesper Lynd.
    Vesper: I'll be keeping my eyes on the money, and off your perfectly formed arse.
    Bond: You noticed?
    Vesper: Even accountants have imaginations.
  • Darker and Edgier: The movie tries to be more mature and realistic than its predecessors — for example, instead of just adding extra blood, sex, and swearing (all of which existed in previous Bond films), the movie made more subtle changes. Interestingly, some of its darkest elements were actually taken straight from the book (such as the torture scene late in the film). We discover in this film that to become a 00 Agent one must have at least two confirmed kills under their belt.
  • Dark and Troubled Past: Heavily implied with Bond. After Vesper performs a Sherlock Scan, she comments that his immediate assumption that she's an orphan is because he himself is one, and while he clearly had private education, he's likely from a poor background, so it was only by the grace of someone's charity. She also believes that the other students never let him forget this, hence the reason for why he has such a massive chip on his shoulder.
  • Dare to Be Badass: The chorus from the opening song puts a darker spin on this trope, basically couching it in a warning that if you don't Take a Level in Badass, you will be dead very quickly:
    Arm yourself, because no one else here will save you
    The odds will betray you
    And I will replace you...
  • Deliberately Monochrome: The pre-title sequence, prior to Bond receiving his 00 status.
  • Demoted to Extra: Felix Leiter in the novel is in contact with Bond from near the beginning and doubles as The Watson. In the film, he only has a dozen or so lines, and the two don't meet until after Bond's been cleaned out.
  • Design Student's Orgasm: With a playing card theme, in the opening credits. Bond is also hit with flurries of cards and British £10 notes.
  • Determinator: Bond, whenever he's in chase mode. When going after the Parkour-adept bombmaker, he uses a bulldozer to smash through the obstacles.
  • Double Meaning: In the theme's lyrics "Life is gone with just a spin of the wheel" can refer either to the casino motif or a critical scene where Le Chiffre gains the upper hand while Bond is driving.
  • Double Meaning Title: The title can be taken as an allusion to the Casino Royale (literally "royal casino") where the poker game takes place, or to the "battle royale" (that is, a duel that can only have one winner) that takes place in the casino.
  • Downer Ending: "The bitch is dead." The line's from the original novel, more or less. Interestingly, M's response to this line provokes a change in 007 that was not there in the novel. Rather than turning hard and misogynistic, he becomes obsessed with revenge. (Of course in either case Bond was simply covering his feelings, showing hatred and contempt instead of the sadness he felt at being betrayed by and losing the woman he loved)
  • Drink Order: Bond's first time ordering a Vesper martini is taken straight from the source material, complete with the waiter's pleased expression as he walks away.
  • Drop Dead Gorgeous: Vesper Lynd does a Sexy Soaked Shirt scene as a corpse.
  • Dungeon Bypass: Bond's answer to Mollaka's freerunning.
  • Even Evil Has Loved Ones: In a blink-and-you'll-miss-it moment, when Bond earns his second kill, we see a photo of the target's family on his desk.
  • Eye Scream: In the final gunfight, Bond shoots a thug in the eye with a nailgun. Ironically, the exact eye that is punctured by the nail was already blind (indicated by the opaque lense of his glasses), if not gone altogether.
  • Fake-Out Make-Out: Fails when a guard spots Bond's earpiece.
  • Fanservice:
    • Bond climbing out of the ocean. Many jaws dropped.
    • For the more traditional fanservice: Why is that woman in a bathing suit riding a horse on a beach?
    • Vesper in the purple dress. Her second dress even more so.
  • Five-Bad Band:
  • Finger-Suck Healing: Bond sucks on Vesper's fingers when she is going into shock.
  • Flashback Effects: Bond's flashbacks to his first kill are grainier than the present-day footage.
  • Framing the Guilty Party: Mathis manages to get Steven Obanno's murder pinned on Le Chiffre's accomplice Leo, sending the terrorist on a one-way trip to the French slam. Nobody cares.
  • Freeze-Frame Bonus: When Dryden is shot, there's a brief shot of him with his family, emphasizing the fact that no matter how you paint him, Bond is a killer.
  • Gaining The Will To Kill: Bond's discussion with Dryden (with flashbacks to a brutal fight between Bond and Dryden's contact) has shades of this. To be promoted to double-0 status, an agent must kill two people. The contact was Bond's first; the second is easier. Considerably.
  • Grenade Tag: At the end of the sequence where Bond is trying to prevent the airport bombing, the bomber apparently gets away and triggers the remote detonator for the bomb — which is when he discovers that Bond planted the bomb on him while they were fighting.
  • Groin Attack: What Le Chiffre does with a knotted rope to torture Bond.
  • Has a Type: James prefers married women. They're less complicated.
  • Heroic BSOD: Bond has a variation at the end of one game after Le Chiffre deliberately uses his tell to fool Bond while everyone else leaves the table.
  • Hoist by His Own Petard:
    • The terrorist who tries to blow up a plane via remote detonator, only to find that Bond clipped the bomb to his belt while they were grappling.
    • In a less lethal example, before the poker game Bond gives Vesper a dress, stating that it is so she can draw the other players' attention from their cards to her. When she does this later, Bond ends up being more distracted than the rest of them.
    • Gettler is killed with the nail gun he used against Bond moments earlier in the climax
  • Hollywood Nerd: Le Chiffre is very good at math, a poker prodigy, and he has an inhaler.
    • Although Word of God has it that he doesn't need it for any medical reasons, he just gets off on the amphetamines.
  • Hostage Situation: Somewhat reversed, in that the hero is the one taking the hostage. Subverted again in that when the eye-patched villain tries to take Vesper hostage, Bond doesn't care what happens to her, because he thinks she's a double agent.
    One Eye: I'll kill her!
    Bond: Allow me.
  • Icy Blue Eyes: Bond.
  • Image Song: Chris Cornell's "You Know My Name", which also has cues in the score to act as the Leit Motif before the final scene.
  • Informed Attractiveness
    Vesper: Hello.
  • It Gets Easier:
    Dryden: How did he die?
    Bond: Your contact? Not well.
    Dryden: Made you feel it, did he? Well, you needn't worry. The second is(gets shot by Bond)
    Bond: Yes. Considerably.
  • It May Help You on Your Quest: ELLIPSIS.
  • It Works Better with Bullets:
    • In the pre-credits sequence, Dryden tries to shoot Bond with a hidden gun, only to learn that Bond had already found and disarmed it.
    • The African bomber tries to shoot Bond while on the crane, but he's out of bullets.
  • I Want My Beloved to Be Fashionable: An inversion: Bond and Lynd are dressing each other up long before their relationship has had much development.
  • Jack of All Stats: They make a point of establishing this about Bond early in the movie. He's athletic but can't match the Le Parkour skills of his quarry and has to use his brain, working the environment, to make up the difference.
  • Jerk with a Heart of Gold: Craig's Bond is shown initially as a cynical and tough guy. However that doesn't mean he has no humanity or he doesn't feel compassion or pity. The "shower" sequence says all.
  • Killed Mid-Sentence: Bond does this early in the film to earn his 00 status.
    Dryden: [Discussing Bond's first kill] Made you feel it, did he? Well...you needn't worry. The second is—
    *pew*
    Bond: ...Yes. Considerably.
  • Kiss of Life: Bond tries this on Vesper. It doesn't work and quickly turns into a heartbreaking Last Kiss.
  • Knee-capping: Casino Royale ends with Bond locating and knee-capping The Man Behind the Man.
  • Kung-Shui: The freerunner hops a fence, Bond hijacks a bulldozer. Freerunner flips through a narrow hole in a wall, Bond powers through the wall. Freerunner hops down several flights of unfinished stairs, Bond hops on a hydraulic lift and smashes the hydraulics. BOND SMASH!
  • Le Parkour: The original creator of free running plays a bomber running away from Bond. The bomber uses parkour, whereas Bond takes somewhat more of a ''direct'' route...
  • Logo Joke: The opening Vanity Plates, like the scene they lead into, are Deliberately Monochrome.
  • Love Interest Traitor: Double example: this film has Vesper, playing along with Bond until she steals the money to get her boyfriend (who she's still in love with) back. However, it's suggested that she did fall for Bond as well, cutting a deal to save his life in exchange for going through with the theft. Bond's Roaring Rampage of Revenge in the next film culminates with the reveal that the original boyfriend is himself a traitor, seducing women with access to state secrets and using them to obtain and sell said secrets. Fortunately(?), Vesper's killed before she finds out about that facet of his personality. She dies thinking that she has at least saved the lives of the two men she loved.
  • Magical Defibrillator: Bond pulls one out after being poisoned. At first it looks like it's going to be used to treat actual fibrillation, for a change, but in the end it turns into a use-the-defibrillator-to-restart-a-stopped-heart scene after all.
  • The Magic Poker Equation: The final hand plays this straight. Well, straight flush, actually. The hands leading up to it play with it a bit, especially with Le Chiffre's tell.
  • The Man Behind the Man: Alex Dimitrios to the parkour bomber, then Le Chiffre to Dimitrios and Mr. White to Le Chiffre. Continues on into Quantum of Solace, where more men behind Mr. White are revealed.
  • Meaningful Echo: "Money isn't as important as knowing who to trust": What Le Chiffre says to Dimitiros when he reminds him what's important in their organization and also the last sentence he hears before a SMERSH/QUANTUM agent kills him.
  • Meta Casting: The parkour bomb-maker in the beginning is played by Sébastien Foucan, one of the developers of parkour.
  • Misplaced Wildlife: An early scene has people watching a fight between a mongoose and a cobra... except the mongoose is actually a ferret.
  • Mobstacle Course: The Le Parkour villain does this when he wants to be a jerk.
  • Mood Whiplash: During the exceptionally brutal torture scene, Bond informs Le Chiffre that he has an itch "down there". The villain takes another whack at the poor man's family jewels while Bonds screams: "No, no! To the right! To the right!" before breaking down into hysterical laughter/tears and exclaiming: "Now the whole world's gonna know you died scratching my balls!"
  • Mythology Gag:
    • Vesper's introduction to Bond references Miss Moneypenny, who does not appear in the film.
    • Later in the film, a bartender asks him whether he prefers his martini shaken or stirred. Bond responds, "Do I look like I give a damn?"
    • And on their way to the Casino, Bond jokingly tells Vesper her alias is "Stephanie Broadchest", referencing the naming style of Bond girls like Pussy Galore, Honey Ryder and Kissy Suzuki.
    • When M chastises Bond early in the movie, she mentions "Christ, I miss the Cold War," a callback to her character's introduction in GoldenEye, where she chastises Bond (played by Pierce Brosnan) for being a "relic of the Cold War."
    • Bond wins a classic Aston Martin DB5, which is one of the best known cars from the older movies.
    • Can anyone say "Two measures of Gordon's, one of vodka, half a measure of Kina Lillet, shaken well over ice until chilled, and served with a thin slice of lemon"?
    • At the Bodies exhibition in Miami, Demetrios' bag gets tagged number 53, in reference to Casino Royale's original publication year, 1953.
  • Nail 'Em: Gettler attacks Bond with a nail gun in the climax. It appears to have rapid fire function.
  • The Name Is Bond, James Bond:
    • Bond's iconic introduction serves as the punchline to The Tag at the end of the film, complete with the James Bond Leitmotif.
    • Said by Mathis. René Mathis.
  • The Namesake: The film is named for the casino in Montenegro where a poker tournament which takes most of the second act happens.
  • Neutral Female: Subverted in the fight with the African warlords. Vesper, idle and shocked, takes a while to react but eventually helps Bond decisively.
  • Never Bring a Knife to a Fist Fight: Bond can handle the guy with a machete.
  • Never Trust a Trailer: You see Bond kissing Vesper in the sea in the poster up there? The scene, which also appears in the trailer, is not in the movie.
  • Nice to the Waiter: Throughout the film, Bond is shown tipping porters, waiters and drivers serving him. As noted under Parking Payback, Bond crashes the car of a Jerk Ass guest who treats him rudely, and in the end, after beating Le Chiffre, Bond gives one of his newly-won casino chips to the dealer (and considering how much they were playing for, that chip probably comes with several zeroes).
    • It was one of the 500k franc plaques. Since Montenegro is an Expy of Monaco and presuming French francs, it converts to over US$100,000 at the time of this writing. It pays to give good service.
  • Parking Payback: Bond is mistaken for a member of the resort staff and ordered by a guest (with extreme condescension) to park his car. He does so — by backing it forcefully into a parking barrier, setting off many car alarms. This is not just for kicks and giggles; it's a handy distraction as well so Bond can get a good look at the hotel's security footage. Gets a Brick Joke when the guest spots Bond later that night, double-taking in surprise.
  • The Password Is Always Swordfish: Subverted. Bond initially thinks "Ellipsis" is some sort of codename, but it turned out to be the letters corresponding to the number code on a door at the airport. Go figure. And later played straight, when Bond uses the numbers corresponding to "Vesper" as a password — the name of the woman he's got on his side.
  • Pineapple Surprise: A bomber tries to use a tiny keyring bomb attached to a fuel tanker to blow up a plane. After a long fight with Bond, the bomber triumphantly pushes the switch on his detonator...only to realize that Bond had attached the bomb to his belt loop.
  • Pragmatic Adaptation: While obviously more well-known and popular, Texas Hold-Em is also far more of a psychological warfare game than Baccarat.
  • Precision F-Strike: When Bond asks "why should I need more time," adding "the job is done, and the bitch is dead."
  • Product Placement:
    • Lots, especially for Sony. The most bizarre one has to be the hotel that stores its surveillance camera footage on Blu-ray discs...
    • Vesper brings up James's watch when evaluating his personality, which he corrects her Rolex guess to Omega. The marketing for the film also included Omega ads involving Bond.
      • Gets a little funnier since the release of Skyfall, as Bérénice Marlohe is a brand ambassador for the watchmakers.
    • Aston Martin, both in the DB5 he gets in a poker game (also present in the original movie) and the shiny brand-new DBS he gets from M.
  • Publicly Discussing The Secret: After making contact with Mathis, Bond and Vesper proceed to discuss their secret mission in a café just off the town square. Mathis also brings up blackmailing Royale's chief of police, with none of the other patrons noticing any of it.
  • Race Lift: Felix Leiter (a blond Texan in the novels) is black in this movie and in Quantum of Solace (played by Jeffrey Wright). Leiter had previously been played by white actors in the EON films, although the non-canonical Never Say Never Again also had a black Leiter, played by Bernie Casey.
  • Railing Kill: Bond throws a bodyguard over a stairwell railing before fighting Obanno.
  • Rated M for Manly
  • Red Right Hand: As many Bond villains do, most of the bad guys have one. Le Chiffre even lampshades it.
  • Rewind, Replay, Repeat: Bond checks the security tapes at the Ocean Club.
  • Ripped from the Headlines: Le Chiffre's plan to sabotage the test flight of a new airliner was clearly inspired by the troubles Boeing was having in getting the 787 Dreamliner ready for its first official test flight around that time.
  • Road Trip Across The Street: After playing poker with Dimitrios at the Ocean Club, Bond invites Solange Dimitrios back to his place for a drink. She asks him if it's far, he assures her it isn't, and they set off. Seconds later, he parks the car — back at the Ocean Club, which is also where he's staying.
  • Rule of Cool: Bond wins the card game, against master poker players, not by outplaying them or by some great strategy (though he was probably the chip leader on that last hand; the player with the most chips can't lose more on an "all-in" bet than the player with the second most chips--if Bond wasn't the chip leader, or tied for it, the game wouldn't have been over), but because he gets a straight flush at the exact right moment in the ideal situation, where everyone else stays in because they all happen to have hands that are near impossible to beat (as opposed to folding when they realize Bond probably has a good hand, which would be the typical outcome), which has even more ridiculous odds. The only reason the audience does not question what is nearly mathematically impossible is that Bond getting a straight flush is flippin' cool.
    • Nearly mathematically impossible, yes, but ask any card player about their worst bad beat, and it'll sound almost exactly like Le Chiffre's. The odds of aces full (or, better, quad aces) losing a hand are very low, and yet it happens. What's more, it's more likely to happen in Texas Hold 'Em because of how the game works. Given the cards that came up in the last hand, it would have been very difficult for any player in that last hand to fold, especially if they were low on chips.
    • Bond also tips over all of his chips when going all-in; in real life, this is highly annoying for players and dealers alike since it's easier and quicker to mark amounts when players keep their chips in stacks and shoving them in a pile is just a big messy headache.
  • Scenery Porn: Southern Europe is gorgeous.
  • Screw the Rules, I'm Doing What's Right: Bond doesn't let the fact that a known terrorist and bomb-maker has sought refuge in an embassy stop him from taking him down. M is naturally furious.
  • Sequel Hook: So much that the opening scene of Quantum of Solace continues right after Bond gets Mr. White.
  • Sherlock Scan: Bond and Vesper do this to each other on the train.
  • Shirtless Scene: Bond at the beach.
  • Shoot the Shaggy Dog: It sure took a long time for Bond and Vesper to go to Italy just for her to betray him and die. Hell, if the movie didn't end 10 minutes before it did the whole thing would've been a Shaggy Dog Story; the trail to the case died, Vesper died, and le Chiffre died without MI6 getting the information from him that they wanted.
  • Shower of Angst: Vesper takes one fully clothed while Bond tries to comfort her.
  • Show Some Leg: To give Bond an advantage in the poker game, he gets Vesper a very low-cut dress. It backfires somewhat - Bond ends up just as distracted, especially since Vesper intentionally ignores his instruction to walk up behind him and instead approaches from the other side of the table so that he can see her coming.
  • Somebody Set Up Us the Bomb: At the end of the sequence where Bond is trying to prevent the airport bombing, the bomber apparently gets away and triggers the remote detonator for the bomb — which is when he discovers that Bond planted the bomb on him while they were fighting. Cue Oh Crap from the bomber, and a sardonic grin from Bond.
  • Soul Brotha: Felix Leiter.
  • Staggered Zoom: At the start of the airport chase sequence.
  • Stealth Pun: Bond wonders why Vesper bought him a dinner jacket, and more importantly, how it perfectly fits him, to which Vesper says "I sized you up" on the train, not just physically but psychologically as well.
  • Stock Sound Effect: The klaxon alarm at the embassy had also been used in Osato's office and Blofeld's volcano lair in You Only Live Twice and Sanchez's factory in Licence to Kill.
  • Stealth Pun: Felix Leiter, James Bond's Brother From Langley.
  • Super Cell Reception: Bond is issued a super-awesome Sony Ericsson phone that could make calls from the most isolated places in the world, browse the Internet like it was plugged in with a 1024 kbps data link, with a GPS map that could follow tracker bugs. It follows in the tradition of Bond's obscenely advanced gadgets.
  • Tampering with Food and Drink: Bond gets poisoned and has to defib himself. Ouch.
  • The Stoic: James Bond.
  • Technology Marches On: Cell phones, here probably intended to show how gadgets aren't necessary in the modern world. They looked terrific at the time (remember that GPS?) but amusingly, in today's smartphone era they all now look terribly out of date.
  • The Tell
  • Theme Music Withholding: Done so very well.
  • These Hands Have Killed: Vesper goes through this during her Shower of Angst, after she's involved with Bond's confrontation with the African warlords. She didn't actually kill anyone, even indirectly (in fact, the action she's angsting over is technically the act of saving Bond's life), but she still has the symptoms.
  • Too Dumb to Live: The undercover Agent who keeps putting his hand to his ear, thus giving himself away.
    Bond: Put your bloody hand down!
  • Too Kinky to Torture: Not really, but invoked by Bond as part of being Defiant to the End. He asks Le Chiffre to scratch an itch for him.
  • To the Pain: "You know, I never understood all these elaborate tortures. It's the simplest thing... to cause more pain than a man can possibly endure." (Then comes the Groin Attack.)
  • Tracking Chip: MI6 implants a GPS tracker in James Bond to keep track of him.
  • Tragic Hero: It's written basically as a tragedy, showing Bond's downward spiral of failure and futility. As a spy, he's clearly in over his head and only succeeds in a technical sense through sheer luck and outside intervention. It's only after he loses everything, including Vesper, that he embraces his profession as a super-spy.
  • Trailers Always Spoil: The trailers for the film include the very last shot of the film, with Bond in the very nice suit and vest while carrying a silenced submachine gun. They do leave out the context and the line that makes that scene so awesome though.
    • The action in Venice, making it clear more than just post-victory celebration will occur there.
  • Tranquil Fury: Daniel Craig's portrayal of Bond. Even M is unnerved at how he never visibly appears angry.
  • Troubled Fetal Position: Vesper does this in a Shower of Angst. Originally she was supposed to be in her underwear in the scene, but she argued that, traumatized from seeing Bond killing several people, she wouldn't have stopped to get undressed.
  • Try And Follow: Bond chasing after the bomber.
  • Two Decades Behind: Definitely an example of Pandering to the Base. The recipe for the martini variant Bond names after Vesper Lynd is taken word-for-word from the novel. The problem is, Lillet stopped making one of its ingredients, Kina Lillet, in 1986, replacing it with a reformulated Lillet (sans the quinine that gave it the "Kina" part of the name) called Lillet Blanc. But the film is set in the present-day, and mentions Kina Lillet by name (this also shows up in Quantum of Solace).
  • Viewers Are Morons: Mathis' job is to provide running commentary on the poker games in case the viewers get confused or don't appreciate when something is significant. The worst example is when Bond loses a hand, but says it was part of his plan to discover his opponent's "tell:" his eye twitches when he's bluffing, and he moves his fingers to his eye to stop the twitching. The next hand the villain does this right on schedule. The camera zooms in to make it obvious, but it's not enough. The camera then pans to Mathis, who says, "It's the tell! He's bluffing!" Thanks for reminding us, Mathis!
  • Villainous Breakdown: Le Chiffre is stoic until Bond resists his torture, and actually mocks him for it.
    "You! Are SO WRONG!!"
  • Villainous Rescue: Mr. White interrupting Bond's torture to kill Le Chiffre.
  • Vomiting Cop: M's personal assistant, Villiers, when M and Bond are watching Solange's body being dealt with.
    • Which is Hilarious in Hindsight for those who recognize Villiers as Brutus on "Rome", someone much more accustomed to that sort of thing.
  • Watch the Paint Job: The effects crew managed to rotate Bond's Aston Martin 7 times for the scene where it's totaled. Makes any car fan weep, and it set a world record in the process. On the DVD extra featurette about how they performed the stunt, they felt it necessary to include a disclaimer noting the car was specially reinforced and Do Not Try This at Home. As if the average person who buys an Aston Martin's first impulse is to see how many times you can roll it . . . .
  • What Happened to the Mouse?: What happened to Felix Leiter stepping in to bring in Le Chiffre?
  • What the Hell, Hero?: Subverted. M gives Bond a severe chewing out for shooting the unarmed bombmaker and blowing up an embassy, but her main complaint is that he got caught on videotape doing it.
  • Why We Are Bummed Communism Fell: "Christ, I miss the Cold War." (Consider too that this is the first Bond film explicitly set after 9/11 and world politics in Hollywood History terms is much more complex.) It's also a Mythology Gag. When Judi Dench was first cast in the Bond universe, while chastising Brosnan!Bond about his trigger-happy nature, she refers to him as a "relic from the Cold War."
  • Worthy Opponent: Vesper to Bond, after presenting him with a real dinner jacket.
    Bond: It's tailored!
    Vesper: I sized you up the moment I met you.
  • Xanatos Speed Chess: Things take a sharp turn for the confusing after Bond and Vesper are rescued following the card game.
  • Yank the Dog's Chain: Bond, Happily Married? A beautiful dream, not gonna happen. Especially since it ended badly the last time it happened.
  • You Can Always Tell A Liar: Figuring out Le Chiffre's tell is a key part of Bond's strategy in the poker game. He later tells Vesper that everybody has a tell, except her, which is foreshadowing that he can't tell she's been lying to him.
  • You Have Failed Me: Mr White kills Le Chiffre after he failed to get back the money.
  • You Look Familiar: Poker game participant Madame Wu is played by Tsai Chin, who also played the Chinese girl Bond bedded at the beginning of You Only Live Twice.
  • "You're Not My Type": In an exchange between Bond and Vesper.
    Bond: Don't worry, you're not my type.
    Vesper: Smart?
    Bond: Single.
  • Your Princess Is in Another Castle: The Big Bad has been defeated, Vesper and Bond do it, all is good... Vesper suddenly steals 120 million dollars to pay for her fiancé's ransom. And dies.

Die Another DayFilm/James BondQuantum of Solace
Magic Plastic SurgeryImageSource/Live-Action FilmsFilm
GoldenEyeJustForFun/Tropes Examined by the Myth BustersKill Bill
Die Another DayFilms Of The 2000s-FranchisesQuantum of Solace

alternative title(s): Casino Royale 2006
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