History YMMV / TheTalesOfBeedleTheBard

28th Jul '17 5:42:35 PM Lorealie
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** One can either take the story of the Deathly Hallows at face value in regards to the third brother, as he was able to live with his family without worrying about Death coming for him the way it did for his brothers until he decided to pass his Hallow onto his son. The other view is that the third brother was just as screwed as the others and that each Hallow comes with their own type of "curse" fitting the nature of their request. This curse theory stems from how while demanding invincibility and the power to raise the dead are both pretty hubristic, his own demand to hide from Death can be seen as very arrogant of him as well while the story merely presents this as being clever. So the youngest could have spent his entire life hiding away from the world, unable to meaningfully interact with other people including ''his own children'' for fear of Death finding him should he remove the cloak for too long. And as for what happened to him in the end? He "welcomed Death as a friend", which could be seen as him either [[FaceDeathWithDignity being satisfied with the life he lived and deciding his time on earth should come to an end]] or [[DrivenToSuicide growing sick of the hollow life he was living]] depending on the preferred view. This particular case could be helped by how while parts of it are "true" it could still have been changed over time to help give it a clearer moral for younger audiences, much like how we know Ron's mother changed the time of day it took place to make it "spookier" when she'd tell it to him.

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** One can either take the story of apply this with the Deathly Hallows at face value in regards to the third brother, as brother's fate. The first interpretation is taking the story of at face value, which indicated he was able to live with his family without worrying about Death coming for him the way it did for his brothers until he decided to pass his Hallow onto his son. The other view is that the third brother was just as screwed as the others and that each Hallow comes with their own type of "curse" fitting the nature of their request. This curse theory stems from how while demanding invincibility and the power to raise the dead are both pretty hubristic, his own demand to hide from Death can be seen as very arrogant of him as well while the story merely presents this as being clever. So the youngest could have spent his entire life hiding away from the world, unable to meaningfully interact with other people including ''his own children'' for fear of Death finding him should he remove the cloak for too long. And as for what happened to him in the end? He "welcomed Death as a friend", which could be seen as him either [[FaceDeathWithDignity being satisfied with the life he lived and deciding his time on earth should come to an end]] or [[DrivenToSuicide growing sick of the hollow life he was living]] depending on the preferred view. This particular case could be helped by how while parts of it are proven "true" it could still have been changed over time to help give it a clearer moral for younger audiences, much like how we know Ron's mother changed the time of day it the meeting with Death took place at to make it "spookier" when she'd tell it to him.
28th Jul '17 3:11:24 PM Lorealie
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** One can either take the story of the Deathly Hallows at face value in regards to the third brother, as he was able to live with his family without worrying about Death coming for him the way it did for his brothers until he decided to pass his Hallow onto his son. The other view is that the third brother was just as screwed as the others and that each Hallow comes with their own type of "curse" fitting the nature of their request. This curse theory stems from how while demanding invincibility and the power to raise the dead are both pretty hubristic, his own demand to hide from Death can be seen as very arrogant of him as well while the story merely presents this as being clever. So the youngest could have spent his entire life hiding away from the world, unable to meaningfully interact with other people including ''his own children'' for fear of Death finding him should he remove the cloak for too long. And as for what happened to him in the end? He "welcomed Death as a friend", which could be seen as him either [[FaceDeathWithDignity being satisfied with the life he lived and deciding him time on earth should come to an end]] or [[DrivenToSuicide growing sick of the hollow life he was living]] depending on the preferred view. This particular case could be helped by how while parts of it are "true" it could still have been changed over time to help give it a clearer moral for younger audiences, much like how we know Ron's mother changed the time of day it took place to make it "spookier" when she'd tell it to him.

to:

** One can either take the story of the Deathly Hallows at face value in regards to the third brother, as he was able to live with his family without worrying about Death coming for him the way it did for his brothers until he decided to pass his Hallow onto his son. The other view is that the third brother was just as screwed as the others and that each Hallow comes with their own type of "curse" fitting the nature of their request. This curse theory stems from how while demanding invincibility and the power to raise the dead are both pretty hubristic, his own demand to hide from Death can be seen as very arrogant of him as well while the story merely presents this as being clever. So the youngest could have spent his entire life hiding away from the world, unable to meaningfully interact with other people including ''his own children'' for fear of Death finding him should he remove the cloak for too long. And as for what happened to him in the end? He "welcomed Death as a friend", which could be seen as him either [[FaceDeathWithDignity being satisfied with the life he lived and deciding him his time on earth should come to an end]] or [[DrivenToSuicide growing sick of the hollow life he was living]] depending on the preferred view. This particular case could be helped by how while parts of it are "true" it could still have been changed over time to help give it a clearer moral for younger audiences, much like how we know Ron's mother changed the time of day it took place to make it "spookier" when she'd tell it to him.
28th Jul '17 3:10:52 PM Lorealie
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** One can either take the story of the Deathly Hallows at face value in regards to the third brother, as he was able to live with his family without worrying about Death coming for him the way it did for his brothers until he decided to pass his Hallow onto his son. The other view is that the third brother was just as screwed as the others and that each Hallow comes with their own type of "curse" fitting the nature of their request. This curse theory stems from how while demanding invincibility and the power to raise the dead are both pretty hubristic, his own demand to hide from Death can be seen as very arrogant of him as well while the story merely presents this as being clever. So the youngest could have spent his entire life hiding away from the world, unable to meaningfully interact with other people including ''his own children'' for fear of Death finding him should he remove the cloak for too long. And as for what happened to him in the end? He "welcomed Death as a friend", which could be seen as him either being satisfied with the life he lived and deciding him time on earth should come to an end or growing sick of the hallow life he was living depending on the preferred view. This particular case could be helped by how while parts of it are "true" it could still have been changed over time to help give it a clearer moral for younger audiences, much like how we know Ron's mother changed the time of day it took place to make it "spookier" when she'd tell it to him.

to:

** One can either take the story of the Deathly Hallows at face value in regards to the third brother, as he was able to live with his family without worrying about Death coming for him the way it did for his brothers until he decided to pass his Hallow onto his son. The other view is that the third brother was just as screwed as the others and that each Hallow comes with their own type of "curse" fitting the nature of their request. This curse theory stems from how while demanding invincibility and the power to raise the dead are both pretty hubristic, his own demand to hide from Death can be seen as very arrogant of him as well while the story merely presents this as being clever. So the youngest could have spent his entire life hiding away from the world, unable to meaningfully interact with other people including ''his own children'' for fear of Death finding him should he remove the cloak for too long. And as for what happened to him in the end? He "welcomed Death as a friend", which could be seen as him either [[FaceDeathWithDignity being satisfied with the life he lived and deciding him time on earth should come to an end end]] or [[DrivenToSuicide growing sick of the hallow hollow life he was living living]] depending on the preferred view. This particular case could be helped by how while parts of it are "true" it could still have been changed over time to help give it a clearer moral for younger audiences, much like how we know Ron's mother changed the time of day it took place to make it "spookier" when she'd tell it to him.
28th Jul '17 3:07:12 PM Lorealie
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* AlternateCharacterInterpretation: The third brother was just as screwed as the others. Demanding invincibility and the power to raise the dead are both pretty hubristic, but so is the demand to hide from Death. Brother Number Three spent his entire life hiding away from the world, unable to meaningfully interact with other people, unable to truly live. And what happened to him in the end? He welcomed Death as a friend, committing suicide just like the second brother, because his hollow life had become unbearable. The Cloak is just as much a curse as the other Hallows.
** If he never got to meaningfully interact with anyone, [[FridgeLogic then how did he have a son?]]
*** He may have already had a son before he got the cloak. The story does say he hid from Death for the rest of his life, after all.
** Unlikely given the literary theme. The middle brother is written in the cautionary, somber tone you would expect of a story of someone DrivenToSuicide. The younger brother, by contrast, is praised and respected.
*** Meh. Call it ValuesDissonance if you must. Just because it's written in one tone doesn't stop it from looking a hell of a lot like something else.
** He did not commit suicide, he died of old age, but content and fulfilled in his life, hence why he welcomed Death as an equal, not something he was running from anymore.
*** He was immortal as long as Death couldn't find him; taking off the Cloak was basically inviting Death to come and claim him. Suicide by old age is unusual, certainly, but in this story it's no different from taking yourself off life support.

to:

* AlternateCharacterInterpretation: Given the vague way fairy tales are often told this can crop up.
** One can either take the story of the Deathly Hallows at face value in regards to the third brother, as he was able to live with his family without worrying about Death coming for him the way it did for his brothers until he decided to pass his Hallow onto his son.
The other view is that the third brother was just as screwed as the others. Demanding others and that each Hallow comes with their own type of "curse" fitting the nature of their request. This curse theory stems from how while demanding invincibility and the power to raise the dead are both pretty hubristic, but so is the his own demand to hide from Death. Brother Number Three Death can be seen as very arrogant of him as well while the story merely presents this as being clever. So the youngest could have spent his entire life hiding away from the world, unable to meaningfully interact with other people, unable to truly live. people including ''his own children'' for fear of Death finding him should he remove the cloak for too long. And as for what happened to him in the end? He welcomed "welcomed Death as a friend, committing suicide just like friend", which could be seen as him either being satisfied with the second brother, because his hollow life had become unbearable. The Cloak is just as much a curse as he lived and deciding him time on earth should come to an end or growing sick of the other Hallows.
** If
hallow life he never got to meaningfully interact with anyone, [[FridgeLogic then was living depending on the preferred view. This particular case could be helped by how did he while parts of it are "true" it could still have been changed over time to help give it a son?]]
*** He may have already had a son before he got the cloak. The story does say he hid from Death
clearer moral for the rest of his life, after all.
** Unlikely given the literary theme. The middle brother is written in the cautionary, somber tone you would expect of a story of someone DrivenToSuicide. The
younger brother, by contrast, is praised and respected.
*** Meh. Call it ValuesDissonance if you must. Just because it's written in one tone doesn't stop it from looking a hell of a lot
audiences, much like something else.
** He did not commit suicide, he died of old age, but content and fulfilled in his life, hence why he welcomed Death as an equal, not something he was running from anymore.
*** He was immortal as long as Death couldn't find him; taking off
how we know Ron's mother changed the Cloak was basically inviting Death time of day it took place to come and claim him. Suicide by old age is unusual, certainly, but in this story it's no different from taking yourself off life support.make it "spookier" when she'd tell it to him.
26th Jul '17 5:44:32 AM Nathanoraptor
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Added DiffLines:

** It's possible to read another interpretation into "The Warlock's Hairy Heart"; that the heart, during its long period of severance had become sentient and it motivating him to tear the maiden's out to replace it (whilst not allowing him to use magic) was an act of revenge.
29th Jun '17 12:34:12 PM Shadoboy
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Added DiffLines:

* NightmareFuel: The Warlock's Hairy Heart, full stop.
8th Jan '17 11:51:40 AM SeptimusHeap
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* FreudWasRight: Dumbledore notes that all the claimant owners of the super-powerful Elder Wand have been men, adding "make of that what you will."
11th Aug '16 7:59:30 AM tafelshrew
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Added DiffLines:

*** He was immortal as long as Death couldn't find him; taking off the Cloak was basically inviting Death to come and claim him. Suicide by old age is unusual, certainly, but in this story it's no different from taking yourself off life support.
29th Jan '16 10:58:19 PM Ithilgore
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Added DiffLines:

** He did not commit suicide, he died of old age, but content and fulfilled in his life, hence why he welcomed Death as an equal, not something he was running from anymore.
21st Dec '15 2:19:32 PM tafelshrew
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*** He may have already had a son before he got the cloak.

to:

*** He may have already had a son before he got the cloak. The story does say he hid from Death for the rest of his life, after all.


Added DiffLines:

*** Meh. Call it ValuesDissonance if you must. Just because it's written in one tone doesn't stop it from looking a hell of a lot like something else.
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