History UsefulNotes / Wicca

3rd Aug '15 10:00:06 PM phoenix
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!!Tropes
* AboveGoodAndEvil: Related below, the God and Goddess embody ''all'' of nature which includes disease, pain, and sorrow. Acknowledging their "dark" aspects is crucial in understanding the Divine.
* AFormYouAreComfortableWith: A school of thought on the nature of the Divine says that the forms humanity has given it, such as the various deities (including the Triple Goddess), are merely attempts to understand a being [[YouCannotGraspTheTrueForm ultimately beyond human comprehension]] if viewed in its entirety.
* AnthropomorphicPersonification: The God and Goddess represent various aspects of nature and life.
* AntiMagic: Salt is commonly used for ritual purification. However, if you leave it around your ritual space it may simply stop magic from working.
* BrandNameTakeover: Some people mistakenly refer to ''any'' neo-pagan or witch as a Wiccan, or use the word "Wicca" to refer to any generic brand of neo-paganism. Actually, many religions practice witchcraft, including {{Voudoun}}. It gets ''especially'' frustrating when it's a person insisting on calling their personal brand of neo-paganism "Wicca" when, at best, their path bears only a superficial resemblance to Wicca.
* BrokenBase: Over the issue of whether or not those who aren't in lineaged covens (and therefore, do not know the Mysteries) have the right to [[CallASmeerpARabbit apply the name]] "Wiccan" to what they practice.
** Notice how schizo this very page is; part of it insists Wicca is a mystery religion that only those initiated can truly follow, while other sections mention the information is available to anyone willing to look for it.
*** Both of those statements are largely true; on the one hand most of the important information (even the mysteries) is pretty easy to find if you know where to look, on the other, Wicca, like all mystical religions really, is highly experiential, and you probably won't experience the mysteries as intended without being in a proper coven.
* CantGetAwayWithNuthin: The three-fold law states that whatever you do will come back to you three-fold. So if you do evil...
* ClapYourHandsIfYouBelieve: Magic works this way, though not to the extent that you can summon fireballs or teleport yourself. Also, most agree that magical tools are just props to help you get into the right frame of mind to work magic.
* CoolOldLady: The Crone aspect of the Triple Goddess alternates between this and GrannyClassic.
* CrossoverCosmology: You will meet Wiccan devotees of gods and goddesses across several different pantheons. This is very confusing to non-Wiccans. The broadest answer to this is that a Wiccan invokes their gods in a Wiccan context (i.e. rituals, prayers, spells, etc.) and ascribes to the Wiccan worldview. However, it is respectful to the deity in question to not invoke said deity without developing a good understanding of who they are and what role they play in the original myths. In other words, do not invoke Aphrodite if the only thing you know about her is that she's a "love goddess".
* DarkIsNotEvil: The ''Book of Shadows'' wouldn't get such a name if it were an evil artifact. For that matter, while not an opinion shared by some wiccans, there is a certain motif of balance (which could be translated as a natural equilibrium, which would naturally include darkness and light), and the male god is occasionally reffered to as "The Horned God", similar to pre-wiccan pagan gods such as Cernunnos, which are sometimes mistaken as Satanic.
** Can be interesting when you run into someone who uses dark symbols nearly exclusively. It can be startling if you're not used to it.
** TheSacredDarkness
* {{Demonization}}: It gets a lot of this. You'd think from listening to some people that Wiccans are Satan-worshiping baby-eaters or manic nature worshipers/environmentalists/hippies. It also has a reputation as a religion for women and gay men. Fact is, there are plenty of straight men who are Wiccans. Wiccans care about nature, but they aren't necessarily radical hippies, and they certainly don't eat babies (they'd be as horrified as anyone else at the prospect) or worship Satan.
** This is actually quite often due to simple ignorance; because the people who tend to demonize are the ones who are fundie Christians, they tend to think they should refuse to question 'The Bible', even if what they're not questioning is a potential translation error\out of context. It gets amusing when fundie Christians try to ''refute'' Wicca--one video cited a 'Wiccan' who ''worshipped at her favorite tree''. Sorry, guys. That's Druids. Though, Drds are pretty cool too.
* EsotericMotifs
* EveryoneIsSatanInHell: Wicca gets a ''lot'' of this, mainly from people who don't check their facts. (Or in some cases, sucked it out of their thumbs so they'd have ''something'' to put in their anti-pagan tracts.) One common belief is that Wiccans must be Satanists because they use the "Satanic" pentagram. In reality, the pentagram is an ancient symbol that has been used by many religions to represent many different things, including the five knightly virtues, the five wounds of Christ, and the five books of the Pentateuch. More on its different uses [[http://www.religioustolerance.org/wic_pent.htm here]].
* FanDumb: [[http://wicca.timerift.net/fluffy.shtml Fluffy bunnies]], or people who are attracted to Wicca because it looks shiny, makes them feel Speshul, or gives them something to rebel against their parents with. Symptoms include going on about the [[YouFailHistoryForever nine million witches burned to death in the "Burning Times"]] and refusing to accept criticism and correction from people who actually did the research. Their type is called out and deservedly mocked [[http://somethingpositive.net/sp04242002.shtml here.]]
** Even other Wiccans poke gentle fun at those cute, misguided kids.
** Let's not forget the Anti-Fluff Wiccans who look down on any Wiccans who do not practice their branch of Wicca or practice in a coven.
** Let's also not forget those who believe that the religion is so pick and choose that it shall work for everybody and call you a fundie nut job if you ask basic questions about the faith.
** Being a relatively new religion with a lot of disagreement over what it's supposed to be like, Wicca often takes on the traits of a fandom, which includes the FanDumb.
* FanHater: Some evangelicals get pretty obnoxious about it.
* GreatBigBookOfEverything: The ''Book of Shadows''. The Wiccan/neo-pagan GreatBigBookOfEverything tends to be a bit more like a journal or personal archive of spells, rituals, notes, and other things. Three-ring binders are commonly used, but some Book of Shadows might be a folder on the computer.
* GuideDangIt: Traditionally, coven-based Gardnerian/Alexandrian Wicca's core practices are kept secret from non-initiates, which makes it difficult to actually practice Wicca without being initiated. In the digital age, most Gardnerian-based practices have been available to non-initiates via the Internet and various books that have published the rituals. The real issue is whether or not a person can learn the core practices purely through books and experimentation versus through training by an initiated Wiccan. But, given that the religion was constructed in the 1950s and has had constant and frequent innovations since the 1950s, the matter of what is a core practice, what isn't, and what any particular initiate may or may not know, practice, or believe is quite a can of worms.
* TheHecateSisters: The goddess is said to have three aspects: the Maiden, the Mother, and the Crone.
* HermeticMagic: Wicca involves ceremonial magic, which is a form of this.
* MagicWand: Used as a ritual tool, not as a fireball-shooter.
* MamaBear: Don't let the matronly visage fool you. The Mother is considered the greatest aspect of the Triple Goddess in terms of raw power for this reason. Luckily, we are all Her children.
* MundaneSolution: It's often considered preferable to go this route before attempting the magical solution. Casting a spell of protection is fine and all, but you should still make sure your house has good physical locks if you want to keep your home from getting broken into.
** A variant of this comes into play when finding the right items for spells and rituals. Do you live in a dorm where you're not allowed to burn candles? Buy battery-powered tea lights and paint them. Can't get an athame right now? Use a letter opener or house key, or even your finger.
*** It is generally agreed that one needs no physical instrument to celebrate or work magic; the best altar is the one in your heart, and what you put together outside of that is merely an extension. Do you have access to absolutely nothing? Simply do a ceremony of gestures; again, what matters is intent.
* UsefulNotes/NeoPaganism: Wicca is ''a'' Neo-Pagan religion. It is not a catch-all term for any random Neo-Pagan religion you might come across. (Indeed, practitioners of other neo-pagan religions like Asatru, Celtic Druidry, and Hellenic Paganism can get quite annoyed at being mistaken for Wiccan.)
* NeverMessWithGranny: [[DarkIsNotEvil The Dark Goddess]], who represents death, occult knowledge, and other frightening parts of nature, is the fourth aspect of the Triple Goddess and is associated with the Dark Moon. To keep with the Triple Goddess theme however, some associate these things with the Crone.
* NewerThanTheyThink: Although Gardner tried to reconstruct "the Old Religion" as best as he could, he had to fill in some of the blanks himself. (This is not seen as having any bearing on the validity of the religion, mind you.)
* OutOfClothesExperience: Some Wiccans practice their rituals "skyclad," IE, buck naked.
* {{Reincarnation}}: Not a universal belief, but still common.
* RitualMagic: A lot of spells Wiccans cast are of this sort.
* RobeAndWizardHat: Some Wiccans like to dress in medieval style, especially for special occasions, but it's not a requirement.
* RunningTheAsylum: Many Wiccans study the religion by reading the works of other Wiccan writers. The equivalent would be fans getting their {{Canon}} from fanfiction.
* SimpleStaff: May be used by some in place of a wand.
* SpiritedYoungLady: There are many variations to the Maiden aspect of the Triple Goddess, ranging from [[TheIngenue sweet and innocent flower]] to [[TheLadette independent and fearsome lioness.]]
* [[ThouShaltNotKill Thou Shalt Not Harm]]: One of the only things that everyone agrees on is the Rede (which does not necessarily have to be Wiccan). In all variations there is an approximation of "Do as you will, if you harm none." It basically says, "If it doesn't hurt anyone, it's okay," ''not'' "don't hurt anyone/anything." While the Rede is a fairly pacifistic rule, it does not actually preclude anyone from, for example, joining the military or police.
** Indeed, some Wiccans (this one included) will point out that many of the deities we revere have 'warrior' aspects, so it's a perfectly justifiable act to join the police or military and embrace the Warrior.
* YeOldeButcheredeEnglishe: Some of the early Wiccan documents were written this way. Gardner's early Book of Shadows was called "Ye Bok of Ye Art Magical". Modern writings and revisions are written normally, though.



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%%!!Tropes as portrayed in fiction:
9th Jun '15 5:53:50 AM Morgenthaler
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Wicca became "mainstream" to an extent during TheNineties. The polemic writings of Silver Ravenwolf became popular, movies such as ''TheCraft'' were released during this period, TV shows such as ''Series/{{Charmed}}'' and ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'' featured Wiccan characters, and the ''Literature/HarryPotter'' books, while not about real-life witchcraft in any way, inspired a few young people to take up witchcraft. Such portrayals were almost always inaccurate, sometimes confusing Wicca with either Satanism, other varieties of Neopaganism, or straight-up wizardry.

to:

Wicca became "mainstream" to an extent during TheNineties. The polemic writings of Silver Ravenwolf became popular, movies such as ''TheCraft'' ''Film/TheCraft'' were released during this period, TV shows such as ''Series/{{Charmed}}'' and ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'' featured Wiccan characters, and the ''Literature/HarryPotter'' books, while not about real-life witchcraft in any way, inspired a few young people to take up witchcraft. Such portrayals were almost always inaccurate, sometimes confusing Wicca with either Satanism, other varieties of Neopaganism, or straight-up wizardry.
17th Sep '14 6:31:33 AM Ambaryerno
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Wicca is a fertility-based religion founded in the 1950s by Gerald Gardner, supposedly based as much as possible on pre-Christian British traditions and ceremonial magic societies/orders. Exactly what defines a Wiccan depends on who you ask, but at least one rule is consistent: "Wiccan" is ''not'' a fancy word for "witch," and "Wicca" is not a catch-all term for any neo-pagan religion. Neither is it a term for someone who practices "whatever feels right," even if they take some of their practices and beliefs from Wicca. (That's called eclectic paganism - not that there's anything wrong with it; it's just not Wicca.) Note that the number of people who call themselves Wiccan but do not meet this definition (often because they do not belong to an initiatory tradition or do not follow all these beliefs) is much greater than those who do.

to:

Wicca is a fertility-based religion founded in the 1950s by Gerald Gardner, supposedly based as much as possible on pre-Christian British traditions and ceremonial magic societies/orders. Exactly what defines a Wiccan depends on who you ask, but at least one rule is consistent: "Wiccan" is ''not'' a fancy word for "witch," "witch,"[[note]]Although the word ''wicca'' (plural ''wiccan'') itself actually ''is'' the Old English word for "witch."[[/note]] and "Wicca" is not a catch-all term for any neo-pagan religion. Neither is it a term for someone who practices "whatever feels right," even if they take some of their practices and beliefs from Wicca. (That's called eclectic paganism - not that there's anything wrong with it; it's just not Wicca.) Note that the number of people who call themselves Wiccan but do not meet this definition (often because they do not belong to an initiatory tradition or do not follow all these beliefs) is much greater than those who do.
24th May '14 3:21:57 AM SeptimusHeap
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* {{UsefulNotes/Neo-Paganism}}: Wicca is ''a'' Neo-Pagan religion. It is not a catch-all term for any random Neo-Pagan religion you might come across. (Indeed, practitioners of other neo-pagan religions like Asatru, Celtic Druidry, and Hellenic Paganism can get quite annoyed at being mistaken for Wiccan.)

to:

* {{UsefulNotes/Neo-Paganism}}: UsefulNotes/NeoPaganism: Wicca is ''a'' Neo-Pagan religion. It is not a catch-all term for any random Neo-Pagan religion you might come across. (Indeed, practitioners of other neo-pagan religions like Asatru, Celtic Druidry, and Hellenic Paganism can get quite annoyed at being mistaken for Wiccan.)
27th Jul '13 3:16:08 AM Fireblood
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Wicca is a fertility-based religion founded in the 1950s by Gerald Gardner, supposedly based as much as possible on pre-Christian British traditions and ceremonial magic societies/orders. Exactly what defines a Wiccan depends on who you ask, but at least one rule is consistent: "Wiccan" is ''not'' a fancy word for "witch," and "Wicca" is not a catch-all term for any neo-pagan religion. Neither is it term for someone who practices "whatever feels right," even if they take some of their practices and beliefs from Wicca. (That's called eclectic paganism - not that there's anything wrong with it; it's just not Wicca.) Note that the number of people who term themselves Wiccan but do not meet this definition (often because they do not belong to an initiatory tradition or do not follow all these beliefs) is much greater than those who do.

to:

Wicca is a fertility-based religion founded in the 1950s by Gerald Gardner, supposedly based as much as possible on pre-Christian British traditions and ceremonial magic societies/orders. Exactly what defines a Wiccan depends on who you ask, but at least one rule is consistent: "Wiccan" is ''not'' a fancy word for "witch," and "Wicca" is not a catch-all term for any neo-pagan religion. Neither is it a term for someone who practices "whatever feels right," even if they take some of their practices and beliefs from Wicca. (That's called eclectic paganism - not that there's anything wrong with it; it's just not Wicca.) Note that the number of people who term call themselves Wiccan but do not meet this definition (often because they do not belong to an initiatory tradition or do not follow all these beliefs) is much greater than those who do.



Whilst Gardnerian Wicca was for some time the first and only form of Wicca, many other varieties have risen up around it. One of the first of these, founded by first-degree ''Gardnerian'' initiate Alex Sanders, is Alexandrian Wicca, loosely based on its predecessor. Together with a handful of other coven-based forms tracing their heritage back to New Forest region where Gardnerian Wicca sprang from, these sects comprise what is today known as "British Traditional Wicca", or BTW. However, many other "denominations" of coven-based Wicca have arisen since the evolution of BTW.

The other type is solitary, which is almost the exact opposite of coven-based forms. Firstly, practitioners are given more leniency in their beliefs and practice. Whilst the core tenets of Wicca are there (e.g. belief in the God and Goddess, the Wheel of the Year, the 3-fold law & Rede, etc.), solitaries may also hold different opinions regarding various topics, such as with adherence to different theories of magic. Solitaries also differ from coven-based Wiccans in that they freely share religious information, their primary sources being: the wide variety of books published regarding Wicca and similar metaphysical subjects, such as Buckland's complete guide to witchcraft; ideas inspired by their own personal meditations, known as Unverified Personal Gnosis (UPG). Because of the accessibility of materials and and greater number of outlets for solitaries, it is this face of Wicca is the most familiar to non-Wiccans.

to:

Whilst Gardnerian Wicca was for some time the first and only form of Wicca, many other varieties have risen up around it. One of the first of these, founded by first-degree ''Gardnerian'' initiate Alex Sanders, is Alexandrian Wicca, loosely based on its predecessor. Together with a handful of other coven-based forms tracing their heritage back to into the New Forest region where Gardnerian Wicca sprang from, these sects comprise what is today known as "British Traditional Wicca", or BTW. However, many other "denominations" of coven-based Wicca have arisen since the evolution of BTW.

The other type is solitary, which is almost the exact opposite of coven-based forms. Firstly, practitioners are given more leniency in their beliefs and practice. Whilst the core tenets of Wicca are there (e.g. belief in the God and Goddess, the Wheel of the Year, the 3-fold law & Rede, etc.), solitaries may also hold different opinions regarding various topics, such as with adherence to different theories of magic. Solitaries also differ from coven-based Wiccans in that they freely share religious information, their primary sources being: the wide variety of books published regarding Wicca and similar metaphysical subjects, such as Buckland's complete guide to witchcraft; witchcraft, and ideas inspired by their own personal meditations, known as Unverified Personal Gnosis (UPG). Because of the accessibility of materials and and much greater number of outlets for solitaries, it is this face of Wicca that is the most familiar to non-Wiccans.



Males who practice magic are simply called witches. The term "warlock" is said to refer to those who break the sacred oaths taken during initiation and divulge the Mysteries to non-Wiccans, though the etymology of the term 'warlock' leads in a different direction. It is also quite offensive to call one such. The terms "wizard" and sorcerer/sorceress (and similar) are almost never used.

Wicca became "mainstream" to an extent during TheNineties. The polemic writings of the Silver Ravenwolf became popular, movies such as ''TheCraft'' were released during this period, TV shows such as ''Series/{{Charmed}}'' and ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'' featured Wiccan characters, and the ''Literature/HarryPotter'' books, while not about real-life witchcraft on any way, inspired a few young people to take up witchcraft. Such portrayals were almost always inaccurate, sometimes confusing Wicca with either Satanism, other varieties of Neopaganism, or straight-up wizardry.

to:

Males who practice magic are simply called witches. The term "warlock" is said to refer to those who break the sacred oaths taken during initiation and divulge the Mysteries to non-Wiccans, though and the actual etymology of the term 'warlock' leads indeed derives from "oathbreaker" in a different direction.Old English. It is also quite offensive to call one such. The terms "wizard" and sorcerer/sorceress (and similar) are almost never used.

Wicca became "mainstream" to an extent during TheNineties. The polemic writings of the Silver Ravenwolf became popular, movies such as ''TheCraft'' were released during this period, TV shows such as ''Series/{{Charmed}}'' and ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'' featured Wiccan characters, and the ''Literature/HarryPotter'' books, while not about real-life witchcraft on in any way, inspired a few young people to take up witchcraft. Such portrayals were almost always inaccurate, sometimes confusing Wicca with either Satanism, other varieties of Neopaganism, or straight-up wizardry.



** Notice how schizo this very page is; part of insists Wicca is a mystery religion that only those initiated can truely follow, while other sections mention the information is available to anyone willing to look for it.
*** Both of those statements are largely true, on one hand most of the important information (even the mysteries) is pretty easy to find if you know where to look, on the other, Wicca, like all mystical religions really, is highly experiential, and you probably won't experience the mysteries as intended without being in a proper coven.

to:

** Notice how schizo this very page is; part of it insists Wicca is a mystery religion that only those initiated can truely truly follow, while other sections mention the information is available to anyone willing to look for it.
*** Both of those statements are largely true, true; on the one hand most of the important information (even the mysteries) is pretty easy to find if you know where to look, on the other, Wicca, like all mystical religions really, is highly experiential, and you probably won't experience the mysteries as intended without being in a proper coven.
6th Apr '13 8:57:41 PM nitpickeryandsuch
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In general, there are two main types of Wicca. The first type is coven-based, where adherents gather together to pratise their religion. The oldest form of Wicca, established by Gardner himself (hence known as Gardnerian Wicca) is coven-based and is an orthopraxic mystery religion. Orthopraxic means that correct practice is more important than correct belief (orthodoxy). Like all coven-based forms, its core practices are oath-bound and are not taught to cowans, or outsiders. This means that you can't actually practice Gardnerian Wicca as you'll have no way of actually knowing what a good chunk of the vital practices and rituals actually are. While there are many books ''about'' Gardenarian Wicca, there are no books that actually contain these core practices or Mysteries; at best, the books contain "outer court" information comprising of some history and generic neo-pagan beliefs and practices(however, since the original "Gardnerian" Book of Shadows has been printed multiple times, including what were (formerly) the secret names of the Goddess and God. Most Gardnerian and Alexandrian covens have since augmented the original material with additional, actually still secret stuff). Also, it should be noted that because some of the rituals are sexual in nature (although a far cry from orgies), no-one under the age of 18 is allowed to be initiated for legal and moral reasons.

Whilst Gardnerian Wicca was for some time the first and only form of Wicca, many other varieties have risen up around it. One of the first of these, founded by first-degree ''Gardnerian'' initiate Alex Sanders, is Alexandrian Wicca, loosely based on its predecessor. Together with a hadnful of other coven-based forms tracing their heritage back to New Forest region where Gardnerian Wicca sprang from, these sects comprise what is today known as "British Traditional Wicca", or BTW. However, many other "denominations" of coven-based Wicca have arisen since the evolution of BTW.

The other type is solitary, which is almost the exact opposite of coven-based forms. Firstly, practitioners are given more leniency in their beliefs and practice. Whilst the core tenets of Wicca are there (e.g. belief in the God and Goddess, the Wheel of the Year, the 3-fold law & Rede, etc.), solitaries may also hold different opinions regarding various topics, such as with adherence to different theories of magic. Solitaries also differ from coven-based wiccans in that they freely share religious information, their primary sources being: the wide variety of books published regarding Wicca and similar metaphysical subjects, such as Buckland's complete guide to witchcraft; ideas inspired by their own personal meditations, known as Unverified Personal Gnosis (UPG). Because of the accessibility of materials and and greater number of outlets for solitaries, it is this face of Wicca is the most familiar to non-Wiccans.

to:

In general, there are two main types of Wicca. The first type is coven-based, where adherents gather together to pratise practice their religion. The oldest form of Wicca, established by Gardner himself (hence known as Gardnerian Wicca) is coven-based and is an orthopraxic mystery religion. Orthopraxic means that correct practice is more important than correct belief (orthodoxy). Like all coven-based forms, its core practices are oath-bound and are not taught to cowans, or outsiders. This means that you can't actually practice Gardnerian Wicca as you'll have no way of actually knowing what a good chunk of the vital practices and rituals actually are. While there are many books ''about'' Gardenarian Wicca, there are no books that actually contain these core practices or Mysteries; at best, the books contain "outer court" information comprising of some history and generic neo-pagan beliefs and practices(however, practices. However, since the original "Gardnerian" Book of Shadows has been printed multiple times, including what were (formerly) the secret names of the Goddess and God. Most God, most Gardnerian and Alexandrian covens have since augmented the original material with additional, actually still secret stuff).stuff. Also, it should be noted that because some of the rituals are sexual in nature (although a far cry from orgies), no-one under the age of 18 is allowed to be initiated for legal and moral reasons.

Whilst Gardnerian Wicca was for some time the first and only form of Wicca, many other varieties have risen up around it. One of the first of these, founded by first-degree ''Gardnerian'' initiate Alex Sanders, is Alexandrian Wicca, loosely based on its predecessor. Together with a hadnful handful of other coven-based forms tracing their heritage back to New Forest region where Gardnerian Wicca sprang from, these sects comprise what is today known as "British Traditional Wicca", or BTW. However, many other "denominations" of coven-based Wicca have arisen since the evolution of BTW.

The other type is solitary, which is almost the exact opposite of coven-based forms. Firstly, practitioners are given more leniency in their beliefs and practice. Whilst the core tenets of Wicca are there (e.g. belief in the God and Goddess, the Wheel of the Year, the 3-fold law & Rede, etc.), solitaries may also hold different opinions regarding various topics, such as with adherence to different theories of magic. Solitaries also differ from coven-based wiccans Wiccans in that they freely share religious information, their primary sources being: the wide variety of books published regarding Wicca and similar metaphysical subjects, such as Buckland's complete guide to witchcraft; ideas inspired by their own personal meditations, known as Unverified Personal Gnosis (UPG). Because of the accessibility of materials and and greater number of outlets for solitaries, it is this face of Wicca is the most familiar to non-Wiccans.
22nd Dec '12 12:38:08 PM nombretomado
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Wicca became "mainstream" to an extent during TheNineties. The polemic writings of the Silver Ravenwolf became popular, movies such as ''TheCraft'' were released during this period, TV shows such as ''Series/{{Charmed}}'' and ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'' featured Wiccan characters, and the ''HarryPotter'' books, while not about real-life witchcraft on any way, inspired a few young people to take up witchcraft. Such portrayals were almost always inaccurate, sometimes confusing Wicca with either Satanism, other varieties of Neopaganism, or straight-up wizardry.

to:

Wicca became "mainstream" to an extent during TheNineties. The polemic writings of the Silver Ravenwolf became popular, movies such as ''TheCraft'' were released during this period, TV shows such as ''Series/{{Charmed}}'' and ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'' featured Wiccan characters, and the ''HarryPotter'' ''Literature/HarryPotter'' books, while not about real-life witchcraft on any way, inspired a few young people to take up witchcraft. Such portrayals were almost always inaccurate, sometimes confusing Wicca with either Satanism, other varieties of Neopaganism, or straight-up wizardry.
3rd Sep '12 7:30:45 PM mlsmithca
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** This is actually quite often a case of DidNotDoTheResearch; because the people who tend to demonize are the ones who are fundie Christians, they tend to think they should refuse to question 'The Bible', even if what they're not questioning is a potential translation error\out of context. It gets amusing when fundie Christians try to ''refute'' Wicca--one video cited a 'Wiccan' who ''worshipped at her favorite tree''. Sorry, guys. That's Druids. Though, Drds are pretty cool too.
* DidNotDoTheResearch: Some books (especially ones written before Margaret Murray was discredited) about Wicca are a little dodgy on history. (This isn't an issue for many practitioners, who don't really care how the religion got here so long as it works.) Silver Ravenwolf's are famously dodgy about history ''and'' the religion itself.
** Also, any teenage Wiccan who says that they're going to curse you or make that cute boy they see everyday in the cafeteria fall in love with them is full of shit. See FanDumb below.

to:

** This is actually quite often a case of DidNotDoTheResearch; due to simple ignorance; because the people who tend to demonize are the ones who are fundie Christians, they tend to think they should refuse to question 'The Bible', even if what they're not questioning is a potential translation error\out of context. It gets amusing when fundie Christians try to ''refute'' Wicca--one video cited a 'Wiccan' who ''worshipped at her favorite tree''. Sorry, guys. That's Druids. Though, Drds are pretty cool too.
* DidNotDoTheResearch: Some books (especially ones written before Margaret Murray was discredited) about Wicca are a little dodgy on history. (This isn't an issue for many practitioners, who don't really care how the religion got here so long as it works.) Silver Ravenwolf's are famously dodgy about history ''and'' the religion itself.
** Also, any teenage Wiccan who says that they're going to curse you or make that cute boy they see everyday in the cafeteria fall in love with them is full of shit. See FanDumb below.
too.



* EveryoneIsSatanInHell: Wicca gets a ''lot'' of this, mainly from people who DidNotDoTheResearch. (Or in some cases, sucked it out of their thumbs so they'd have ''something'' to put in their anti-pagan tracts.) One common belief is that Wiccans must be Satanists because they use the "Satanic" pentagram. In reality, the pentagram is an ancient symbol that has been used by many religions to represent many different things, including the five knightly virtues, the five wounds of Christ, and the five books of the Pentateuch. More on its different uses [[http://www.religioustolerance.org/wic_pent.htm here]].

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* EveryoneIsSatanInHell: Wicca gets a ''lot'' of this, mainly from people who DidNotDoTheResearch.don't check their facts. (Or in some cases, sucked it out of their thumbs so they'd have ''something'' to put in their anti-pagan tracts.) One common belief is that Wiccans must be Satanists because they use the "Satanic" pentagram. In reality, the pentagram is an ancient symbol that has been used by many religions to represent many different things, including the five knightly virtues, the five wounds of Christ, and the five books of the Pentateuch. More on its different uses [[http://www.religioustolerance.org/wic_pent.htm here]].
11th Jul '12 3:00:09 PM mysticmoogle
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--> '''An excerpt from''' [[http://doreenvaliente.com/?page_id=625 The Charge of The Goddess]]

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--> '''An excerpt from''' [[http://doreenvaliente.com/?page_id=625 org/2009/06/poem-the-charge-of-the-goddess The Charge of The Goddess]]
23rd Jun '12 5:51:06 AM SeptimusHeap
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In general, there are two main types of Wicca. The first type is coven-based, where adherents gather together to pratise their religion. The oldest form of Wicca, established by Gardner himself (hence known as Gardnerian Wicca) is coven-based and is an orthopraxic mystery religion. Orthopraxic means that correct practice is more important than correct belief (orthodoxy). Like all coven-based forms, its core practices are oath-bound and are not taught to cowans, or outsiders. This means that you can't actually practice Gardnerian Wicca as you'll have no way of actually knowing what a good chunk of the vital practices and rituals actually are. While there are many books ''about'' Gardenarian Wicca, there are no books that actually contain these core practices or Mysteries; at best, the books contain "outer court" information comprising of some history and generic neo-pagan beliefs and practices(YourMileageMayVary on this claim, however, since the original "Gardnerian" Book of Shadows has been printed multiple times, including what were (formerly) the secret names of the Goddess and God. Most Gardnerian and Alexandrian covens have since augmented the original material with additional, actually still secret stuff). Also, it should be noted that because some of the rituals are sexual in nature (although a far cry from orgies), no-one under the age of 18 is allowed to be initiated for legal and moral reasons.

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In general, there are two main types of Wicca. The first type is coven-based, where adherents gather together to pratise their religion. The oldest form of Wicca, established by Gardner himself (hence known as Gardnerian Wicca) is coven-based and is an orthopraxic mystery religion. Orthopraxic means that correct practice is more important than correct belief (orthodoxy). Like all coven-based forms, its core practices are oath-bound and are not taught to cowans, or outsiders. This means that you can't actually practice Gardnerian Wicca as you'll have no way of actually knowing what a good chunk of the vital practices and rituals actually are. While there are many books ''about'' Gardenarian Wicca, there are no books that actually contain these core practices or Mysteries; at best, the books contain "outer court" information comprising of some history and generic neo-pagan beliefs and practices(YourMileageMayVary on this claim, however, practices(however, since the original "Gardnerian" Book of Shadows has been printed multiple times, including what were (formerly) the secret names of the Goddess and God. Most Gardnerian and Alexandrian covens have since augmented the original material with additional, actually still secret stuff). Also, it should be noted that because some of the rituals are sexual in nature (although a far cry from orgies), no-one under the age of 18 is allowed to be initiated for legal and moral reasons.
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