History Main / AlternateCharacterReading

12th Feb '17 5:48:58 AM Wuz
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* ''Series/{{Supergirl 2015}}'': Non-Japanese example. Since Kryptonian is a pictograph language, the famous House of El ''S'' means "Hope" on its own, but Kara explains it's also the start of a Kryptonian phrase that translates as "Stronger together."

to:

* ''Series/{{Supergirl 2015}}'': Non-Japanese example. Since Kryptonian is a pictograph language, the famous House of El ''S'' means "Hope" on its own, but Kara explains it's also the start of a Kryptonian phrase that translates as "Stronger together."
11th Feb '17 8:37:49 PM LinTaylor
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* ''Franchise/{{Gundam}}'' loves doing this with its SuperDeformed Musha (samurai-themed) sub-series, usually giving the characters {{Menaingful Name}}s that are still pronounced "Gundam", "Zaku", etc. One specific example is Lady Kawaguchi's Gunpla from ''Anime/GundamBuildFightersTry''. Its name is written as 紅武者アメイジング (Kurenai Musha Amazing), but the kanji have the furigana レッドウォーリア (Red Warrior), with the full English name being "Kurenai Musha" Red Warrior Amazing[[note]]The distinction being that it's a Musha version of the Red Warrior (Perfect Gundam III) from the old ''Plamo Kyoshiro'' series[[/note]]. Even its weapons work like this; it has wheel-shaped shields on its forearms named 炎輪甲 (''Enrinkou'', literally "Fire Wheel Armor"), with the furigana ホイールアーマー ("Wheel Armor").

to:

* ''Franchise/{{Gundam}}'' loves doing this with its SuperDeformed Musha (samurai-themed) sub-series, usually giving the characters {{Menaingful {{Meaningful Name}}s that are still pronounced "Gundam", "Zaku", etc. One specific example is Lady Kawaguchi's Gunpla from ''Anime/GundamBuildFightersTry''. Its name is written as 紅武者アメイジング (Kurenai Musha Amazing), but the kanji have the furigana レッドウォーリア (Red Warrior), with the full English name being "Kurenai Musha" Red Warrior Amazing[[note]]The distinction being that it's a Musha version of the Red Warrior (Perfect Gundam III) from the old ''Plamo Kyoshiro'' series[[/note]]. Even its weapons work like this; it has wheel-shaped shields on its forearms named 炎輪甲 (''Enrinkou'', literally "Fire Wheel Armor"), with the furigana ホイールアーマー ("Wheel Armor").
11th Feb '17 8:37:23 PM LinTaylor
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Added DiffLines:

* ''Franchise/{{Gundam}}'' loves doing this with its SuperDeformed Musha (samurai-themed) sub-series, usually giving the characters {{Menaingful Name}}s that are still pronounced "Gundam", "Zaku", etc. One specific example is Lady Kawaguchi's Gunpla from ''Anime/GundamBuildFightersTry''. Its name is written as 紅武者アメイジング (Kurenai Musha Amazing), but the kanji have the furigana レッドウォーリア (Red Warrior), with the full English name being "Kurenai Musha" Red Warrior Amazing[[note]]The distinction being that it's a Musha version of the Red Warrior (Perfect Gundam III) from the old ''Plamo Kyoshiro'' series[[/note]]. Even its weapons work like this; it has wheel-shaped shields on its forearms named 炎輪甲 (''Enrinkou'', literally "Fire Wheel Armor"), with the furigana ホイールアーマー ("Wheel Armor").


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** Even the series' name is an example of this, as the kanji for "Touhou" can also be pronounced "Higashikata" -- as in [[Manga/JojosBizarreAdventureDiamondIsUnbreakable Josuke Higashikata]]. Needless to say, ZUN is a huge ''[=JoJo=]'' fan.
31st Jan '17 6:14:27 PM Discar
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Added DiffLines:

* ''Series/{{Supergirl 2015}}'': Non-Japanese example. Since Kryptonian is a pictograph language, the famous House of El ''S'' means "Hope" on its own, but Kara explains it's also the start of a Kryptonian phrase that translates as "Stronger together."
21st Jan '17 7:25:40 AM 64SuperNintendo
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[[folder:Real Life]]
* Courtesy of a major Japanese life insurer, the second most popular boy's name in 2014, as written, was 大翔. However, they also noted different parents gave the same name different pronunciations, including Hiroto, Haruto, Yamato, Taiga (Tiger)[[note]]This is a WorldCup2010 reference.[[/note]], Sora[[note]]"Sky." The kanji means "great flight"--note the creativity Japanese apply in this.[[/note]], Taito, Daito, and Masato. [[http://www.meijiyasuda.co.jp/enjoy/ranking/read_best10/index.html See here]].
** Also because of this trope, the [[http://www.meijiyasuda.co.jp/enjoy/ranking/ entire survey results]] has to be broken into "top names as written" and "top names as pronounced," and further broken down into "top names as written--how are they pronounced" and "top names as pronounced--how are they written"...
** In fact, some kanji have multiple on'yomi (Chinese-borrowed) pronunciations, since the same character was borrowed from Chinese multiple times, hundreds of years apart. While this is a headache for anybody learning Japanese, it's extremely helpful for scholars of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Middle_Chinese Middle Chinese]], since a lot of its pronunciations are preserved in modern Japanese. [[Literature/JurassicPark Like a mosquito in amber, with dinosaur DNA inside its stomach]].
* There are a few characters that have multiple readings in Chinese itself. One example is 行, which has at least three different Mandarin pronunciations (xing2, hang2, xing4) depending on its meaning, at least four in Cantonese (hang4, haang4, hong4, hang6). Though it is rare for these alternate pronunciations to be used for wordplays. Chinese wordplays are more on the side of FunWithHomophones.
* Ancient Babylonian (along with its sister languages) had the same issue, since the Babylonians adopted Sumerian characters that could be given either a Sumerian pronunciation or a native Babylonian one.
* Creator/AkiToyosaki has a fairly unusual way to spell her first name (愛生), so she sometimes calls herself "Ainama" which are two of the most common readings of those two kanji.
[[/folder]]


Added DiffLines:

[[folder:Real Life]]
* Courtesy of a major Japanese life insurer, the second most popular boy's name in 2014, as written, was 大翔. However, they also noted different parents gave the same name different pronunciations, including Hiroto, Haruto, Yamato, Taiga (Tiger)[[note]]This is a WorldCup2010 reference.[[/note]], Sora[[note]]"Sky." The kanji means "great flight"--note the creativity Japanese apply in this.[[/note]], Taito, Daito, and Masato. [[http://www.meijiyasuda.co.jp/enjoy/ranking/read_best10/index.html See here]].
** Also because of this trope, the [[http://www.meijiyasuda.co.jp/enjoy/ranking/ entire survey results]] has to be broken into "top names as written" and "top names as pronounced," and further broken down into "top names as written--how are they pronounced" and "top names as pronounced--how are they written"...
** In fact, some kanji have multiple on'yomi (Chinese-borrowed) pronunciations, since the same character was borrowed from Chinese multiple times, hundreds of years apart. While this is a headache for anybody learning Japanese, it's extremely helpful for scholars of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Middle_Chinese Middle Chinese]], since a lot of its pronunciations are preserved in modern Japanese. [[Literature/JurassicPark Like a mosquito in amber, with dinosaur DNA inside its stomach]].
* There are a few characters that have multiple readings in Chinese itself. One example is 行, which has at least three different Mandarin pronunciations (xing2, hang2, xing4) depending on its meaning, at least four in Cantonese (hang4, haang4, hong4, hang6). Though it is rare for these alternate pronunciations to be used for wordplays. Chinese wordplays are more on the side of FunWithHomophones.
* Ancient Babylonian (along with its sister languages) had the same issue, since the Babylonians adopted Sumerian characters that could be given either a Sumerian pronunciation or a native Babylonian one.
* Creator/AkiToyosaki has a fairly unusual way to spell her first name (愛生), so she sometimes calls herself "Ainama" which are two of the most common readings of those two kanji.
[[/folder]]
3rd Jan '17 5:17:00 PM Wuz
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* These are definitely not the only way to read characters. Some kanji words are pronounced neither with kun-yomi nor on-yomi pronunciation, but instead a different word of native Japanese or Western origin, matched with the kanji in meaning. These readings are known as ''jukujikun''. For example, 明日 (ashita/asu = tomorrow) should either be 'mei-nichi' in on-yomi, or 'akari-hi' in kun-yomi. The reason it is read as ashita/asu is because ashita/asu is already an established word on Japan when the word 明日 was brought over, and was applied to the native ashita/asu due to both having the same meaning. This trick was recycled in the Meiji era but with western words and Sino-Japanese kanji words.

to:

* These are definitely not the only way to read characters. Some kanji words are pronounced neither with kun-yomi nor on-yomi pronunciation, but instead a different word of native Japanese or Western origin, matched with the kanji in meaning. These readings are known as ''jukujikun''.''jukujikun'' (熟字訓). For example, 明日 (ashita/asu = tomorrow) should either be 'mei-nichi' in on-yomi, or 'akari-hi' in kun-yomi. The reason it is read as ashita/asu is because ashita/asu is already an established word on Japan when the word 明日 was brought over, and was applied to the native ashita/asu due to both having the same meaning. This trick was recycled in the Meiji era but with western words and Sino-Japanese kanji words.



Sometimes, the gloss will show a non-standard reading or another kanji, usually to clarify or highlight a particular nuance the author wishes to convey. This is known as ''gikun'', and is differentiated from ''jukujikun'' by being a stylistic choice instead of a systematic property, though there is overlap between the two. This technique dates back to the Man'yōshū and Kojiki, and was very common among Edo period writers (mixing and matching Chinese words to Japanese glosses) and Meiji writers (mixing and matching Sino-Japanese words to recently borrowed Western glosses). A few common examples:

to:

Sometimes, the gloss will show a non-standard reading or another kanji, usually to clarify or highlight a particular nuance the author wishes to convey. This is known as ''gikun'', ''gikun'' (義訓), and is differentiated from ''jukujikun'' by being a stylistic choice instead of a systematic property, though there is overlap between the two. This technique dates back to the Man'yōshū and Kojiki, and was very common among Edo period writers (mixing and matching Chinese words to Japanese glosses) and Meiji writers (mixing and matching Sino-Japanese words to recently borrowed Western glosses). A few common examples:



A somewhat related though fundamentally different wordplay is ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ateji ateji]]''. Due to the fact that a single sound or a series of several sounds could correspond to one or multiple different kanji, it is possible to transcribe a single phonetic (often borrowed) word into a series of kanji, often but not always with significant semantics in a process known as [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phono-semantic_matching phono-semantic matching]]. This wordplay uses the kanji for their phonetic value and only with varying regards to their meaning. For instance, the kanji written form of sushi, 寿司 (su-shi) literally means something like "lifespan-administrator", but these literal meanings are completely ignored in common usage and only their sounds are meaningful.

to:

A somewhat related though fundamentally different wordplay is ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ateji ateji]]''. Due to the fact that ateji]]'' (当て字). Because a single sound syllable or a series of several sounds syllables could correspond to one or multiple different kanji, more kanji characters, it is possible to transcribe a single phonetic (often borrowed) word into a series of kanji, often but not always kanji characters, sometimes with significant semantics in a process known as [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phono-semantic_matching phono-semantic matching]]. This wordplay uses the kanji for their phonetic value and only with varying regards to their meaning. For instance, the kanji written form of sushi, 寿司 (su-shi) literally means something like "lifespan-administrator", but these literal meanings are completely ignored in common usage and only their sounds are meaningful.
3rd Jan '17 4:24:47 PM Wuz
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* These are definitely not the only way to read characters. Many words were established before the Chinese characters were brought over, and the characters were chosen to match the meanings rather than their sounds. These readings are known as ''jukujikun''. For example, 明日 (ashita/asu = tomorrow) should either be 'mei-nichi' in on-yomi, or 'akari-hi' in kun-yomi. The reason it is read as ashita/asu is because ashita/asu is already an established word on Japan when the characters 明日 were brought over, and were applied to the native ashita/asu.

to:

* These are definitely not the only way to read characters. Many Some kanji words were established before are pronounced neither with kun-yomi nor on-yomi pronunciation, but instead a different word of native Japanese or Western origin, matched with the Chinese characters were brought over, and the characters were chosen to match the meanings rather than their sounds.kanji in meaning. These readings are known as ''jukujikun''. For example, 明日 (ashita/asu = tomorrow) should either be 'mei-nichi' in on-yomi, or 'akari-hi' in kun-yomi. The reason it is read as ashita/asu is because ashita/asu is already an established word on Japan when the characters word 明日 were was brought over, and were was applied to the native ashita/asu.ashita/asu due to both having the same meaning. This trick was recycled in the Meiji era but with western words and Sino-Japanese kanji words.
3rd Jan '17 4:01:58 PM Wuz
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A somewhat related (though fundamentally different) wordplay is ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ateji ateji]]''. Due to the fact that each sound in Japanese could correspond to multiple characters with individual meanings, it is possible to transcribe a single phonetic (often borrowed) word with a variety of different characters, often (but not always) with significant semantics in a process known as [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phono-semantic_matching phono-semantic matching]]. This wordplay uses the characters for their phonetic value (with varying regards to their meaning), and is also found in [[UsefulNotes/ChineseLanguage Chinese]]. For instance, one written form of sushi, 寿司 (su-shi) literally means something like "lifespan-administrator", but these literal meanings are completely ignored in common usage and only their sounds are meaningful.

to:

A somewhat related (though though fundamentally different) different wordplay is ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ateji ateji]]''. Due to the fact that each a single sound in Japanese or a series of several sounds could correspond to one or multiple characters with individual meanings, different kanji, it is possible to transcribe a single phonetic (often borrowed) word with into a variety series of different characters, kanji, often (but but not always) always with significant semantics in a process known as [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phono-semantic_matching phono-semantic matching]]. This wordplay uses the characters kanji for their phonetic value (with and only with varying regards to their meaning), and is also found in [[UsefulNotes/ChineseLanguage Chinese]]. meaning. For instance, one the kanji written form of sushi, 寿司 (su-shi) literally means something like "lifespan-administrator", but these literal meanings are completely ignored in common usage and only their sounds are meaningful.
2nd Jan '17 11:52:26 PM Wuz
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* These are definitely not the only way to read characters. Many words, especially place names, were established before the Chinese characters were brought over, and the characters were chosen to match the meanings rather than their sounds. These readings are known as ''jukujikun''. For example, 明日 (ashita/asu = tomorrow) should either be 'mei-nichi' in on-yomi, or 'akari-hi' in kun-yomi. The reason it is read as ashita/asu is because ashita/asu is already an established word on Japan when the characters 明日 were brought over, and were applied to the native ashita/asu.

to:

* These are definitely not the only way to read characters. Many words, especially place names, words were established before the Chinese characters were brought over, and the characters were chosen to match the meanings rather than their sounds. These readings are known as ''jukujikun''. For example, 明日 (ashita/asu = tomorrow) should either be 'mei-nichi' in on-yomi, or 'akari-hi' in kun-yomi. The reason it is read as ashita/asu is because ashita/asu is already an established word on Japan when the characters 明日 were brought over, and were applied to the native ashita/asu.
2nd Jan '17 11:48:04 PM Wuz
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* These are definitely not the only way to read characters. Many words, especially place names, were established before the Chinese characters were brought over, and the characters were chosen to match the meanings rather than their sounds. These readings are known as ''jukujikun''. For example, 銀杏 (i-chou = Gingko tree) which should be pronounced "gin-kou" if on-yomi were used, and 明日 (ashita/asu = tomorrow) which should either be 'mei-nichi' in on-yomi, or 'akari-hi' in kun-yomi. (Incidentally, the literal meanings of the two characters means "cheerful, bright" + "day, sun", none of which mean "tomorrow" but was established with this meaning in Chinese when it was borrowed and applied to the native 'ashita/asu')

to:

* These are definitely not the only way to read characters. Many words, especially place names, were established before the Chinese characters were brought over, and the characters were chosen to match the meanings rather than their sounds. These readings are known as ''jukujikun''. For example, 銀杏 (i-chou = Gingko tree) which should be pronounced "gin-kou" if on-yomi were used, and 明日 (ashita/asu = tomorrow) which should either be 'mei-nichi' in on-yomi, or 'akari-hi' in kun-yomi. (Incidentally, the literal meanings of the two characters means "cheerful, bright" + "day, sun", none of which mean "tomorrow" but was The reason it is read as ashita/asu is because ashita/asu is already an established with this meaning in Chinese word on Japan when it was borrowed the characters 明日 were brought over, and were applied to the native 'ashita/asu')ashita/asu.
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