History Main / AlternateCharacterReading

25th Apr '17 12:12:18 AM Fuyumoto
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** The [[BirdPeople part bird]] [[ParasolOfPain umbrella wielding]] ActionMom. Her name is 姑獲鳥, which should be read "Kokakuchō" but her in-game profile states that it's read [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ubume "Ubume"]]. Becomes SpellMyNameWithAnS when even her [[Creator/ToaYukinari voice actress]] uses the former reading.

to:

** The [[BirdPeople part bird]] part-bird]] [[ParasolOfPain umbrella wielding]] umbrella-wielding]] ActionMom. Her name is 姑獲鳥, which should be read "Kokakuchō" but her in-game profile states that it's read [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ubume "Ubume"]]. Becomes SpellMyNameWithAnS when even her [[Creator/ToaYukinari voice actress]] uses the former reading.
25th Apr '17 12:11:04 AM Fuyumoto
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** The [[BirdPeople part bird]] [[ParasolOfPain umbrella wielding]] ActionMom. Her name is 姑獲鳥, which should be read "Kokakuchō" but her in-game profile states that it's read [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ubume "Ubume"]]. Becomes SpellMyNameWithAnS when even her [[Creator/ToaYukinari voice actress]] uses the former reading.
24th Apr '17 11:35:11 PM Fuyumoto
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* ''[[VideoGame/{{Onmyoji}} Onmyōji]]'' has the little BirdPeople siblings. The younger sister's name is Dōjo, which is the ''on'yomi'' of its ''kanji'' writing 童女. Her older brother, on the other hand, has his ''kanji'' name 童男 read "Oguna" rather than its ''on'yomi'' "Dōdan" like one would expect.
28th Mar '17 11:24:36 AM SneaselSawashiro
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Sometimes the furigana will be an English word in katakana, most likely as RuleOfCool. (e.g. スマイル ''sumairu'' for 笑顔 ''egao''), both meaning "smile". This example is often milked to hell and back in most shounen-based manga.

to:

* Sometimes the furigana will be an English word in katakana, most likely as RuleOfCool. (e.g. スマイル ''sumairu'' for 笑顔 ''egao''), both meaning "smile". This example is often milked to hell and back in most shounen-based manga.
manga. For some cases it can be used cleverly not only for wordplay, but it can also allow for some who know enough kanji to understand the context of some strangely crafted English terms (akin to BuffySpeak).
21st Mar '17 8:27:28 PM Wuz
Is there an issue? Send a Message


One note is that kanji characters, having Chinese roots, also have Chinese pronunciations, and one can go further on to Korean Hanja pronunciations. These readings are rarely used for word plays.

to:

One note is that kanji characters, having Chinese roots, also have Chinese pronunciations, and one can go further on from there to Korean Hanja pronunciations.other derived regional readings. These readings are rarely used for word plays.
13th Mar '17 6:14:43 PM Wuz
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* These are definitely not the only way to read characters. Another pronunciation is known as ''jukujikun'' (熟字訓), where one would just have to memorize a certain reading of a multiple-character word and not derive it from on-yomi or kun-yomi. Many words, especially place names, were established before the Chinese characters were brought over, and the characters were chosen to match the meanings rather than their sounds. For example, 明日 (ashita/asu = tomorrow), would've been 'mei-nichi' in on-yomi, or 'akari-hi' in kun-yomi.

to:

* These are definitely not the only way to read characters. Another pronunciation is known as ''jukujikun'' (熟字訓), where one would just have to memorize a certain reading of a multiple-character word and not derive it from on-yomi or kun-yomi. Many words, especially place names, One cause behind this is that many words were established before the Chinese characters were brought over, and the characters were chosen to match the meanings rather than their sounds. For example, 明日 (ashita/asu = tomorrow), would've been 'mei-nichi' in on-yomi, or 'akari-hi' in kun-yomi.



One note is that kanji characters, having Chinese roots, also have Chinese pronunciations, though they are rarely used for word plays.

A somewhat related though fundamentally different wordplay is ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ateji ateji]]'' (当て字), where a word is phonetically transcribed into a series of kanji characters, most of the time without any regard to their meanings. For example, the kanji written form of sushi, 寿司 (su-shi) is an ateji, and literally means something like "lifespan-administrator".

to:

One note is that kanji characters, having Chinese roots, also have Chinese pronunciations, though they and one can go further on to Korean Hanja pronunciations. These readings are rarely used for word plays.

A somewhat related though fundamentally different wordplay is ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ateji ateji]]'' (当て字), where a word is phonetically transcribed into a series of kanji characters, most of the time without any regard to their meanings.meanings, though sometimes semantics will be considered. For example, the kanji written form of sushi, 寿司 (su-shi) is an ateji, and literally means something like "lifespan-administrator".
8th Mar '17 5:31:55 PM Wuz
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Most Japanese words use fully one or the other. For example, combined characters are usually all read with either kun-yomi or on-yomi. Example, 流れ星 (naga-re-boshi = shooting star) is read with the kun-yomi for both characters. A good tip is the middle hiragana, which is okurigana for 'naga-re' (to flow), which generally (but not always) indicates that kun-yomi should be used. However, this word can also appear as 流星 (ryuu-sei = shooting star), which use the same characters, both read with on-yomi. Some words, however, use a combination, where one character is read with kun-yomi and another with on-yomi. This is very rare, but you can see it in common words like: 焼肉 (yaki-niku = Grilled meat) uses both kun-yomi (yaku, which would be 'shou' with on-yomi) and on-yomi (niku, which has a rare kun-yomi 'shishi'). These words are called 湯桶読み (yu-tou-yomi) and 重箱読み (juu-bako-yomi) depending on the order (kun-on =former, on-kun = latter).

to:

* Most Japanese words use fully one or the other. For example, combined characters are usually all read with either kun-yomi or on-yomi. Example, 流れ星 (naga-re-boshi = shooting star) is read with the kun-yomi for both characters. A good tip is the middle hiragana, which is okurigana for 'naga-re' (to flow), which generally (but not always) indicates that kun-yomi should be used. However, this word can also appear as 流星 (ryuu-sei = shooting star), which use the same characters, both read with on-yomi. Some words, however, use a combination, where one character is read with kun-yomi and another with on-yomi. This is very rare, but you can see it in common words like: 焼肉 (yaki-niku = Grilled meat) uses both kun-yomi (yaku, which would be 'shou' with on-yomi) and on-yomi (niku, which has a rare kun-yomi 'shishi'). These words are called 湯桶読み (yu-tou-yomi) and 重箱読み (juu-bako-yomi) depending on the order (kun-on =former, = former, on-kun = latter).



* These are definitely not the only way to read characters. Another pronunciation is known as ''jukujikun'' (熟字訓), where one would just have to memorize a certain reading of a multiple-character word and not derive it from on-yomi or kun-yomi. Many words, especially place names, were established before the Chinese characters were brought over, and the characters were chosen to match the meanings rather than their sounds. For example, 明日 (meaning tomorrow), read as ashita/asu, would've been 'mei-nichi' in on-yomi, or 'akari-hi' in kun-yomi.

to:

* These are definitely not the only way to read characters. Another pronunciation is known as ''jukujikun'' (熟字訓), where one would just have to memorize a certain reading of a multiple-character word and not derive it from on-yomi or kun-yomi. Many words, especially place names, were established before the Chinese characters were brought over, and the characters were chosen to match the meanings rather than their sounds. For example, 明日 (meaning (ashita/asu = tomorrow), read as ashita/asu, would've been 'mei-nichi' in on-yomi, or 'akari-hi' in kun-yomi.



Sometimes, the gloss will show a non-standard reading or another kanji, usually to clarify or highlight a particular nuance the author wishes to convey. This is known as ''gikun'' (義訓), and is differentiated from ''jukujikun'' by being a stylistic choice instead of a systematic property, though there is overlap between the two. This technique dates back to the Man'yōshū and Kojiki, and was very common among Edo period writers (mixing and matching Chinese words to Japanese glosses) and Meiji writers (mixing and matching Sino-Japanese words to recently borrowed Western glosses). A few common examples:

to:

Sometimes, the gloss will show a non-standard reading or another kanji, usually to clarify or highlight a particular nuance the author wishes to convey. This is known as ''gikun'' (義訓), and is differentiated from ''jukujikun'' by being a stylistic choice instead of a systematic property, though there is overlap between the two.property. This technique dates back to the Man'yōshū and Kojiki, and was very common among Edo period writers (mixing and matching Chinese words to Japanese glosses) and Meiji writers (mixing and matching Sino-Japanese words to recently borrowed Western glosses). A few common examples:
8th Mar '17 5:28:18 PM Wuz
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* These are definitely not the only way to read characters. Some kanji words are pronounced neither with kun-yomi nor on-yomi pronunciation, but instead a different word of native Japanese or Western origin, matched with the kanji in meaning. These readings are known as ''jukujikun'' (熟字訓). For example, 明日 (ashita/asu = tomorrow) should either be 'mei-nichi' in on-yomi, or 'akari-hi' in kun-yomi. The reason it is read as ashita/asu is because ashita/asu is already an established word on Japan when the word 明日 was brought over, and was applied to the native ashita/asu due to both having the same meaning. This trick was recycled in the Meiji era but with western words and Sino-Japanese kanji words.

to:

* These are definitely not the only way to read characters. Some kanji words are pronounced neither with kun-yomi nor on-yomi pronunciation, but instead a different word of native Japanese or Western origin, matched with the kanji in meaning. These readings are Another pronunciation is known as ''jukujikun'' (熟字訓). (熟字訓), where one would just have to memorize a certain reading of a multiple-character word and not derive it from on-yomi or kun-yomi. Many words, especially place names, were established before the Chinese characters were brought over, and the characters were chosen to match the meanings rather than their sounds. For example, 明日 (ashita/asu = tomorrow) should either be (meaning tomorrow), read as ashita/asu, would've been 'mei-nichi' in on-yomi, or 'akari-hi' in kun-yomi. The reason it is read as ashita/asu is because ashita/asu is already an established word on Japan when the word 明日 was brought over, and was applied to the native ashita/asu due to both having the same meaning. This trick was recycled in the Meiji era but with western words and Sino-Japanese kanji words.kun-yomi.



It is worthy to note that kanji characters, having Chinese roots, also have Chinese pronunciations (and from there you can go on to other pronunciations like Korean Hanja pronunciations), though the use of these pronunciations for word plays is rare.

to:

It is worthy to One note is that kanji characters, having Chinese roots, also have Chinese pronunciations (and from there you can go on to other pronunciations like Korean Hanja pronunciations), pronunciations, though the use of these pronunciations they are rarely used for word plays is rare.
plays.
8th Mar '17 5:28:18 PM Wuz
Is there an issue? Send a Message
8th Mar '17 5:08:16 PM Wuz
Is there an issue? Send a Message


A somewhat related though fundamentally different wordplay is ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ateji ateji]]'' (当て字). Because a single syllable or a series of several syllables could correspond to one or more kanji characters, it is possible to transcribe a word into a series of kanji characters, sometimes with significant semantics in a process known as [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phono-semantic_matching phono-semantic matching]]. This wordplay uses the kanji for their phonetic value and only with varying regards to their meaning. For instance, the kanji written form of sushi, 寿司 (su-shi) literally means something like "lifespan-administrator", but these literal meanings are completely ignored in common usage and only their sounds are meaningful.

to:

A somewhat related though fundamentally different wordplay is ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ateji ateji]]'' (当て字). Because a single syllable or a series of several syllables could correspond to one or more kanji characters, it is possible to transcribe (当て字), where a word is phonetically transcribed into a series of kanji characters, sometimes with significant semantics in a process known as [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phono-semantic_matching phono-semantic matching]]. This wordplay uses most of the kanji for their phonetic value and only with varying regards time without any regard to their meaning. meanings. For instance, example, the kanji written form of sushi, 寿司 (su-shi) is an ateji, and literally means something like "lifespan-administrator", but these literal meanings are completely ignored in common usage and only their sounds are meaningful.
"lifespan-administrator".
This list shows the last 10 events of 258. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.AlternateCharacterReading