History Main / AlternateCharacterReading

28th Nov '16 7:30:58 PM Exusia
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** In ''VisualNovel/PhoenixWrightAceAttorneySpiritOfJustice'', this was used in localization with Bucky Whet; the characters on his outfit were changed from his Japanese surname to kanji that can be pronounced "Ueto", a pun on his last name. This itself has a double meaning, as they can also be interpreted as "[[DrowningMySorrows heavy drinker]]".
26th Nov '16 1:14:18 PM Generality
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* Played with in ''Manga/DragonBall'' when the [[CombatCommentator Tenkaichi Budokai announcer]] mispronounced Son Goku's name as "Mago Gosora" the first time he reads it. At the next tournament, he misreads Chaozu's name as "Gyoza".

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* Played with in ''Manga/DragonBall'' when the [[CombatCommentator Tenkaichi Budokai announcer]] mispronounced Son Goku's name as "Mago Gosora" the first time he reads it. At the next tournament, he misreads Chaozu's name as "Gyoza". It's played more seriously in the third tournament, in which Kami (AKA {{God}}) participates incognito by [[DemonicPossession inhabiting]] a human named Shen. Goku figures out his real identity when he remembers that the kanji for "Kami" also has the reading "Shen", as in Shenron, the divine dragon.
26th Nov '16 7:37:51 AM Wuz
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Sometimes, the gloss will show a non-standard reading or another kanji, usually to clarify or highlight a particular nuance the author wishes to convey. This technique dates back to the Man'yōshū and Kojiki, and was very common among Edo period writers (mixing and matching Chinese words to Japanese glosses) and Meiji writers (mixing and matching Sino-Japanese words to recently borrowed Western glosses). A few common examples:
* Making puns by giving the kanji for one word and a reading corresponding to a different one. This is known as ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ateji ateji]]''.

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Sometimes, the gloss will show a non-standard reading or another kanji, usually to clarify or highlight a particular nuance the author wishes to convey. This technique dates back to the Man'yōshū Practical uses of these wordplay are known as ''gikun'', which roughly means "meaningful trained (as in not normal and Kojiki, and was very common among Edo period writers (mixing and matching Chinese words to Japanese glosses) and Meiji writers (mixing and matching Sino-Japanese words to recently borrowed Western glosses). requires special memorization) reading". A few common examples:
examples:

* Making puns by giving the kanji for one word and a reading corresponding to a different one. This is known as ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ateji ateji]]''.


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A somewhat related (though fundamentally different) wordplay is ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ateji ateji]]''. Due to the fact that each sound in Japanese could correspond to multiple characters with individual meanings, it is possible to transcribe a single phonetic (often borrowed) word with a variety of different characters, often with significant semantics in a process known as [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phono-semantic_matching phono-semantic matching]]. This wordplay uses the characters for their phonetic value (with varying regards to their meaning), and is also found in [[UsefulNotes/ChineseLanguage Chinese]].

This technique dates back to the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Man%27y%C5%8Dgana Man'yōsh&#363 as Man'yōgana]]; and Kojiki, and was very common among Edo period writers (mixing and matching Chinese words to Japanese glosses) and Meiji writers (mixing and matching Sino-Japanese words to recently borrowed Western glosses).
5th Nov '16 3:47:28 AM Wuz
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[[folder: Fictional Examples]]

[[AC: Live-Action TV]]
* ''Series/{{Supergirl 2015}}'': Since Kryptonian is a pictograph language, the famous House of El ''S'' means "Hope" on its own, but Kara explains it's also the start of a Kryptonian phrase that translates as "Stronger together."
[[/folder]]
20th Oct '16 8:21:20 AM WaxingName
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* ''Manga/JoJosBizarreAdventure'' uses this fairly often; for example, Killer Queen has an attack written as 負けて死ね, which means "Lose and Die", but the furigana for it is バイツァ・ダスト, pronounced "[[Music/{{Queen}} Bites the Dust]]". Then there's the two Josukes, whose first names can alternatively be read as [[FamilyThemeNaming "JoJo"]].

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* ''Manga/JoJosBizarreAdventure'' ''Franchise/JoJosBizarreAdventure'' uses this fairly often; for example, Killer Queen has an attack written as 負けて死ね, which means "Lose and Die", but the furigana for it is バイツァ・ダスト, pronounced "[[Music/{{Queen}} Bites the Dust]]". Then there's the two Josukes, [[Manga/JoJosBizarreAdventureDiamondIsUnbreakable two]] [[Manga/JoJosBizarreAdventureJoJolion Josukes]], whose first names can alternatively be read as [[FamilyThemeNaming "JoJo"]].
20th Oct '16 6:59:40 AM bowserbros
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* In a rare '''English''' example, ''Series/MontyPythonsFlyingCircus'' features [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jRoSwOXvD98 a sketch]] about a man whose name is spelled "Raymond Luxury Yacht" but pronounced "Throatwarbler Mangrove".
20th Oct '16 6:57:07 AM bowserbros
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* ''Manga/JoJosBizarreAdventure'' uses this fairly often; for example, Killer Queen has an attack written as 負けて死ね, which means "Lose and Die", but the furigana for it is バイツァ・ダスト, which translates as "[[Music/{{Queen}} Bites the Dust]]".

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* ''Manga/JoJosBizarreAdventure'' uses this fairly often; for example, Killer Queen has an attack written as 負けて死ね, which means "Lose and Die", but the furigana for it is バイツァ・ダスト, which translates as pronounced "[[Music/{{Queen}} Bites the Dust]]".Dust]]". Then there's the two Josukes, whose first names can alternatively be read as [[FamilyThemeNaming "JoJo"]].
12th Oct '16 4:45:26 PM Wuz
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* ''Series/{{Supergirl 2015}}'': Since Kryptonian is a pictograph language, the famous House of El ''S'' means "Hope" on its own, but Kara explains it's also the start of a Kryptonian phrase that translates as "Stronger together."

to:

* ''Series/{{Supergirl 2015}}'': Since Kryptonian is a pictograph language, the famous House of El ''S'' means "Hope" on its own, but Kara explains it's also the start of a Kryptonian phrase that translates as "Stronger together."


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[[folder: Fictional Examples]]

[[AC: Live-Action TV]]
* ''Series/{{Supergirl 2015}}'': Since Kryptonian is a pictograph language, the famous House of El ''S'' means "Hope" on its own, but Kara explains it's also the start of a Kryptonian phrase that translates as "Stronger together."
[[/folder]]
6th Sep '16 12:09:46 AM Wuz
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It is worthy to note that kanji characters, having Chinese roots, also have Chinese pronunciations, though the use of these pronunciations for word plays is rare.

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It is worthy to note that kanji characters, having Chinese roots, also have Chinese pronunciations, pronunciations (and from there you can go on to other pronunciations like Korean Hanja pronunciations), though the use of these pronunciations for word plays is rare.
1st Sep '16 8:11:40 PM Wuz
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* There are a few characters that have multiple readings in Chinese itself. One example is 行, which has at least three different Mandarin pronunciations (xing2, hang2, xing4) depending on its meaning, at least four in Cantonese (hang4, haang4, hong4, hang6).

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* There are a few characters that have multiple readings in Chinese itself. One example is 行, which has at least three different Mandarin pronunciations (xing2, hang2, xing4) depending on its meaning, at least four in Cantonese (hang4, haang4, hong4, hang6). Though it is rare for these alternate pronunciations to be used for wordplays. Chinese wordplays are more on the side of FunWithHomophones.
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