History Main / AlternateCharacterReading

16th Aug '17 1:26:05 PM ItsCursorBby
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* From ''VideoGame/EnsembleStars'', the first kanji in Tori's name can also be read as "momo", which is the basis for at least one of his nicknames. There's also an inversion with Yuuki Makoto, who occasionally makes puns about how he needs courage (''yuuki'' written with different kanji).
6th Aug '17 1:25:46 AM Wuz
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A somewhat related though fundamentally different wordplay is ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ateji ateji]]'' (当て字), where a word is phonetically transcribed into a series of kanji characters, most of the time without any regard to their meanings, though sometimes semantics will be considered. For example, the kanji written form of sushi, 寿司 (su-shi) is an ateji, and literally means something like "lifespan-administrator".

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A somewhat related though fundamentally different wordplay is ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ateji ateji]]'' (当て字), where a word is phonetically transcribed into a series of kanji characters, most of the time without any regard to their meanings, though sometimes semantics will be considered. characters. For example, the kanji written form of sushi, 寿司 (su-shi) is an ateji, and literally means something like "lifespan-administrator".
"lifespan-administrator". The characters' meanings will be disregarded most of the time, though semantics will sometimes be considered (and often for stylistic reasons).
6th Aug '17 1:23:18 AM Wuz
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* Another pronunciation is known as ''jukujikun'' (熟字訓), where one would just have to memorize a certain reading of a multiple-character word and not derive it from on-yomi or kun-yomi. One cause behind this is that many words were established before the Chinese characters were brought over, and the characters were chosen to match the meanings rather than their sounds. For example, 明日 (meaning tomorrow), would've been 'mei-nichi' in on-yomi, or 'akari-hi' in kun-yomi, but is instead 'ashita/asu' (depending on politeness).

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* Another pronunciation is known as ''jukujikun'' (熟字訓), where one would just have to memorize a certain reading of a multiple-character word and not derive it from on-yomi or kun-yomi. One cause behind this is that many words were established before the Chinese characters were brought over, and the characters were chosen to match the meanings rather than their sounds. For example, 明日 (meaning tomorrow), would've been 'mei-nichi' in on-yomi, or 'akari-hi' in kun-yomi, but is instead 'ashita/asu' (depending 'ashita' (or 'asu' depending on politeness).
6th Aug '17 1:22:51 AM Wuz
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* Another pronunciation is known as ''jukujikun'' (熟字訓), where one would just have to memorize a certain reading of a multiple-character word and not derive it from on-yomi or kun-yomi. One cause behind this is that many words were established before the Chinese characters were brought over, and the characters were chosen to match the meanings rather than their sounds. For example, 明日 (ashita/asu = tomorrow), would've been 'mei-nichi' in on-yomi, or 'akari-hi' in kun-yomi.

to:

* Another pronunciation is known as ''jukujikun'' (熟字訓), where one would just have to memorize a certain reading of a multiple-character word and not derive it from on-yomi or kun-yomi. One cause behind this is that many words were established before the Chinese characters were brought over, and the characters were chosen to match the meanings rather than their sounds. For example, 明日 (ashita/asu = (meaning tomorrow), would've been 'mei-nichi' in on-yomi, or 'akari-hi' in kun-yomi.kun-yomi, but is instead 'ashita/asu' (depending on politeness).
18th Jun '17 10:31:13 AM nombretomado
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* ThatOtherWiki has a great explanation [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kanji#On.27yomi_.28Sino-Japanese_reading.29 here]]

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* ThatOtherWiki Wiki/ThatOtherWiki has a great explanation [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kanji#On.27yomi_.28Sino-Japanese_reading.29 here]]
17th May '17 12:30:14 AM BreadBull
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* Another pronunciation is known as ''jukujikun'' (熟字訓), where one would just have to memorize a certain reading of a multiple-character word and not derive it from on-yomi or kun-yomi. One cause behind this is that many words were established before the Chinese characters were brought over, and the characters were chosen to match the meanings rather than their sounds. For example, 明日 (ashita/asu = tomorrow), would've been 'mei-nichi' in on-yomi, or 'akari-hi' in kun-yomi. Irregular pronunciations can also be due to attempts to preserve phonetics - 氷島 means "ice" "land" and is pronounced "aisurando", even though normal rules say it should be pronounced either "korishima" or "hyoto". No points for guessing what it means.

to:

* Another pronunciation is known as ''jukujikun'' (熟字訓), where one would just have to memorize a certain reading of a multiple-character word and not derive it from on-yomi or kun-yomi. One cause behind this is that many words were established before the Chinese characters were brought over, and the characters were chosen to match the meanings rather than their sounds. For example, 明日 (ashita/asu = tomorrow), would've been 'mei-nichi' in on-yomi, or 'akari-hi' in kun-yomi. Irregular pronunciations can also be due to attempts to preserve phonetics - 氷島 means "ice" "land" and is pronounced "aisurando", even though normal rules say it should be pronounced either "korishima" or "hyoto". No points for guessing what it means.



* Glossing semantic compounds made from Chinese characters with a reading borrowed from another language.

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* Glossing semantic compounds made from Chinese characters with a reading borrowed from another language. For example 氷島 means "ice" "land" and is pronounced "aisurando", even though normal rules say it should be pronounced either "korishima" or "hyoto". No points for guessing what it refers to.
17th May '17 12:27:44 AM BreadBull
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* These are definitely not the only way to read characters. Another pronunciation is known as ''jukujikun'' (熟字訓), where one would just have to memorize a certain reading of a multiple-character word and not derive it from on-yomi or kun-yomi. One cause behind this is that many words were established before the Chinese characters were brought over, and the characters were chosen to match the meanings rather than their sounds. For example, 明日 (ashita/asu = tomorrow), would've been 'mei-nichi' in on-yomi, or 'akari-hi' in kun-yomi. Yet another one is ''nanori'' (名乗り) where kanjis have irregular readings found in names and ''only'' in names, behaving sometimes like jukujikun. A very common one that you will see throughout this page is the surname ''Takanashi'' (小鳥遊), read normally as ''kotori asobu''.[[labelnote:Reason because]]Kotori asobu means "little birds at play", and implies that no hawks are present. Thus, the phrase taka ga inai (鷹がいない) meaning "no hawks around" gets compressed into Takanashi.[[/labelnote]]

to:

* These are definitely not the only way to read characters. Another pronunciation is known as ''jukujikun'' (熟字訓), where one would just have to memorize a certain reading of a multiple-character word and not derive it from on-yomi or kun-yomi. One cause behind this is that many words were established before the Chinese characters were brought over, and the characters were chosen to match the meanings rather than their sounds. For example, 明日 (ashita/asu = tomorrow), would've been 'mei-nichi' in on-yomi, or 'akari-hi' in kun-yomi. Yet Irregular pronunciations can also be due to attempts to preserve phonetics - 氷島 means "ice" "land" and is pronounced "aisurando", even though normal rules say it should be pronounced either "korishima" or "hyoto". No points for guessing what it means.
*Yet
another one is ''nanori'' (名乗り) where kanjis have irregular readings found in names and ''only'' in names, behaving sometimes like jukujikun. A very common one that you will see throughout this page is the surname ''Takanashi'' (小鳥遊), read normally as ''kotori asobu''.[[labelnote:Reason because]]Kotori asobu means "little birds at play", and implies that no hawks are present. Thus, the phrase taka ga inai (鷹がいない) meaning "no hawks around" gets compressed into Takanashi.[[/labelnote]]
7th May '17 10:59:45 AM nanakiro
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[[/folder]]

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[[/folder]]
* ''Manga/MyHeroAcademia'' features an inversion: a Class B student with a steel hardening Quirk has the name [[RepetitiveName Tetsutetsu Tetsutetsu]], with each Kanji being fundamentally different [[note]]The characters in "鉄哲徹鐵" can be read as "Steel", "Clear", "Pierce" and archaic term for "[[DepartmentOfRedundancyDepartment Steel]]" respectively[[/note]].
[[/folder]]
3rd May '17 6:06:54 AM Wuz
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One note is that kanji characters, having Chinese roots, also have Chinese pronunciations, and one can go from there to other derived regional readings. These readings are rarely used for word plays, but are somewhat common in ThisIsMyNameOnForeign for people immigrating into Japan from a country with Chinese character names.

to:

One note is that kanji characters, having Chinese roots, also have Chinese pronunciations, and one can go from there to other derived regional readings. These readings are rarely used for word plays, but are somewhat common in ThisIsMyNameOnForeign for people immigrating into Japan from a country with Chinese character names.
plays.
3rd May '17 5:44:39 AM Wuz
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* These are definitely not the only way to read characters. Another pronunciation is known as ''jukujikun'' (熟字訓), where one would just have to memorize a certain reading of a multiple-character word and not derive it from on-yomi or kun-yomi. One cause behind this is that many words were established before the Chinese characters were brought over, and the characters were chosen to match the meanings rather than their sounds. For example, 明日 (ashita/asu = tomorrow), would've been 'mei-nichi' in on-yomi, or 'akari-hi' in kun-yomi. Yet another one is ''nanori'' (名乗り) where kanjis have irregular name-only readings, behaving sometimes like jukujikun. A very common one that you will see throughout this page is the surname ''Takanashi'' (小鳥遊), read normally as ''kotori asobu''.[[labelnote:Reason because]]Kotori asobu means "little birds at play", and implies that no hawks are present. Thus, the phrase taka ga inai (鷹がいない) meaning "no hawks around" gets compressed into Takanashi.[[/labelnote]]

to:

* These are definitely not the only way to read characters. Another pronunciation is known as ''jukujikun'' (熟字訓), where one would just have to memorize a certain reading of a multiple-character word and not derive it from on-yomi or kun-yomi. One cause behind this is that many words were established before the Chinese characters were brought over, and the characters were chosen to match the meanings rather than their sounds. For example, 明日 (ashita/asu = tomorrow), would've been 'mei-nichi' in on-yomi, or 'akari-hi' in kun-yomi. Yet another one is ''nanori'' (名乗り) where kanjis have irregular name-only readings, readings found in names and ''only'' in names, behaving sometimes like jukujikun. A very common one that you will see throughout this page is the surname ''Takanashi'' (小鳥遊), read normally as ''kotori asobu''.[[labelnote:Reason because]]Kotori asobu means "little birds at play", and implies that no hawks are present. Thus, the phrase taka ga inai (鷹がいない) meaning "no hawks around" gets compressed into Takanashi.[[/labelnote]]



To help with all this confusion, phonetic glosses called ''furigana'' are often provided in smaller characters next to the kanji. This invariably happens for names (whose pronunciations are notoriously idiosyncratic--some kanji have special readings ''only'' used in names) and terms with infrequently-used kanji. Publications for younger readers will often gloss common words as well.

to:

To help with all this confusion, phonetic glosses called ''furigana'' are often provided in smaller characters next to the kanji. This invariably happens for names (whose pronunciations are notoriously idiosyncratic--some kanji have special readings ''only'' used in names) idiosyncratic--see ''nanori'') and terms with infrequently-used kanji. Publications for younger readers will often gloss common words as well.



One note is that kanji characters, having Chinese roots, also have Chinese pronunciations, and one can go from there to other derived regional readings. These readings are rarely used for word plays.

to:

One note is that kanji characters, having Chinese roots, also have Chinese pronunciations, and one can go from there to other derived regional readings. These readings are rarely used for word plays.
plays, but are somewhat common in ThisIsMyNameOnForeign for people immigrating into Japan from a country with Chinese character names.
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