History Main / AllTheoriesAreTrue

13th Jun '17 5:09:37 PM NightShade96
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* SCPFoundation lives and breathes this trope. Not only they're true but they're also terrifying.

to:

* SCPFoundation The Wiki/SCPFoundation lives and breathes this trope. Not only they're true are they true, but they're also terrifying.
20th May '17 10:31:23 PM Discar
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->''"I've been studying theoretical physics, although at this point I guess it's just physics."

to:

->''"I've been studying theoretical physics, although at this point I guess it's just physics.""''
20th May '17 10:31:14 PM Discar
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-->'''Gohan''': I've been studying theoretical physics, although at this point I guess it's just physics
-->-- ''On Trunks proving time travel in WebVideo/DragonBallZAbridged''

to:

-->'''Gohan''': I've ->''"I've been studying theoretical physics, although at this point I guess it's just physics
physics."
-->-- ''On '''Gohan''', on Trunks proving time travel in WebVideo/DragonBallZAbridged''
travel, ''WebVideo/DragonBallZAbridged''
27th Dec '16 4:17:24 PM TheFantasyChronicler
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* In the Franchise/MarvelUniverse, a number of fringe theories are quite true, including the Counter-Earth idea and the underlying explanation of nearly all non-magical superpowers deriving from Creator/JackKirby's use of AncientAstronauts in the 1970s series ''Comicbook/TheEternals''. Similarly, from the 1980s to TheNewTens, TimeTravel obeyed the rules of the many-worlds hypothesis as well.



* In the Franchise/MarvelUniverse, a number of fringe theories are quite true, including the Counter-Earth idea and the underlying explanation of nearly all non-magical superpowers deriving from Creator/JackKirby's use of AncientAstronauts in the 1970s series ''Comicbook/TheEternals''. Similarly, from the 1980s to TheNewTens, TimeTravel obeyed the rules of the many-worlds hypothesis as well.
* [[LampshadeHanging Lampshaded]] in an issue of Creator/AlanMoore's ''ComicBook/TomStrong'', where the hero and villain reminisce about a 1930s adventure and are disturbed that phlogiston, liquid heat, was real then... despite having since been disproven as a theory. Tom even pointed out at the time that phlogiston's existence is pure conjecture, and doesn't seem to buy that Saveen has discovered it until it almost kills him. What was more disturbing was how the villain somehow managed to ''invent'' a way to create phlogiston, despite the idea being bunk.



* [[LampshadeHanging Lampshaded]] in an issue of Creator/AlanMoore's ''ComicBook/TomStrong'', where the hero and villain reminisce about a 1930s adventure and are disturbed that phlogiston, liquid heat, was real then... despite having since been disproven as a theory. Tom even pointed out at the time that phlogiston's existence is pure conjecture, and doesn't seem to buy that Saveen has discovered it until it almost kills him. What was more disturbing was how the villain somehow managed to ''invent'' a way to create phlogiston, despite the idea being bunk.



* As part of its satirical use of ConspiracyTheory elements, ''[[Literature/FoucaultsPendulum Foucault's Pendulum]]'' employs a number of fringe theories, including the telluric currents idea. However, the novel is as much a {{Deconstruction}} of this trope (and the Conspiracy Theory and AllMythsAreTrue tropes) as anything, so it's ambiguous whether the theories are true or whether some of the characters are simply perceiving reality from an unusual angle.
* ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'' has a lot of fun with fringe science. Most notably the way the word "quantum" can be used to justify anything, and the morphogenic field. (The ''TabletopGame/DiscworldRoleplayingGame'' notes that all theories of morphic resonance are true on the Disc, ''including the ones that contradict each other''). Not to mention the whole "the world is flat" thing, y'know?



* ''Other Songs'', a [[NoExportForYou not-yet-translated]] novel by Polish author Creator/JacekDukaj, is set on alternate Earth where Aristotle was right.[[note]]Well, not ''fully'' right; let's say as much as Newton was right in our world.[[/note]]
* Several short works by Hugo-winner Ted Chiang follow this formula, including one in which the tower of Babel does in fact reach the sky (Tower of Babylon), and another exploring the ultimate consequences in a world where the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Preformationism preformationist]] hypothesis is accurate (Seventy-Two Letters).

to:

* ''Other Songs'', a [[NoExportForYou not-yet-translated]] novel by Polish author Creator/JacekDukaj, Kate Elliot's ''Crown of Stars'' series is set on alternate Earth where Aristotle was right.[[note]]Well, not ''fully'' right; let's say as in a world in which the Peripatetic theory of a geocentric universe within a series of nested crystal spheres in which are contained the stars and the planets is true. It is still possible to go to the stars, although obviously the experience is a much as Newton was right different one. One character actually speculates on what, in our world.[[/note]]
* Several short works by Hugo-winner Ted Chiang follow this formula, including
the world of the story, is the fringe theory that the universe might be a heliocentric one in which the tower of Babel does in fact reach the sky (Tower of Babylon), stars and another exploring the ultimate consequences planets float in a world where the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Preformationism preformationist]] hypothesis is accurate (Seventy-Two Letters).vacuum, but rejects it.



* ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'' has a lot of fun with fringe science. Most notably the way the word "quantum" can be used to justify anything, and the morphogenic field. (The ''TabletopGame/DiscworldRoleplayingGame'' notes that all theories of morphic resonance are true on the Disc, ''including the ones that contradict each other''). Not to mention the whole "the world is flat" thing, y'know?
* As part of its satirical use of ConspiracyTheory elements, ''[[Literature/FoucaultsPendulum Foucault's Pendulum]]'' employs a number of fringe theories, including the telluric currents idea. However, the novel is as much a {{Deconstruction}} of this trope (and the Conspiracy Theory and AllMythsAreTrue tropes) as anything, so it's ambiguous whether the theories are true or whether some of the characters are simply perceiving reality from an unusual angle.



* Kate Elliot's ''Crown of Stars'' series is set in a world in which the Peripatetic theory of a geocentric universe within a series of nested crystal spheres in which are contained the stars and the planets is true. It is still possible to go to the stars, although obviously the experience is a much different one. One character actually speculates on what, in the world of the story, is the fringe theory that the universe might be a heliocentric one in which the stars and planets float in a vacuum, but rejects it.

to:

* Kate Elliot's ''Crown of Stars'' series ''Other Songs'', a [[NoExportForYou not-yet-translated]] novel by Polish author Creator/JacekDukaj, is set in a world in which the Peripatetic theory of a geocentric universe within a series of nested crystal spheres in which are contained the stars and the planets is true. It is still possible to go to the stars, although obviously the experience is a on alternate Earth where Aristotle was right.[[note]]Well, not ''fully'' right; let's say as much different one. One character actually speculates on what, as Newton was right in the world of the story, is the fringe theory that the universe might be a heliocentric one in which the stars and planets float in a vacuum, but rejects it. our world.[[/note]]



* Several short works by Hugo-winner Ted Chiang follow this formula, including one in which the tower of Babel does in fact reach the sky (Tower of Babylon), and another exploring the ultimate consequences in a world where the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Preformationism preformationist]] hypothesis is accurate (Seventy-Two Letters).



* Ditto the short-lived series ''Series/DarkSkies'', based on [=UFOlogy=] and other 1960s ConspiracyTheory lore.
* A notable SpiritualSuccessor, ''Series/{{Fringe}}'' also uses this trope as its premise.
* In ''Series/{{Sliders}}'', the existence of the Kromaggs (humanoid creatures that evolved instead of ''Homo sapiens'' in various parallel universes) is ascribed to "Killer Ape Theory," a controversial theory in the 1950s about early ''human'' evolution. Notably the real world, Killer Ape Theory tries to explain the divergence between humans and the other apes, while in the show the theory was appropriated to explain the divergence between Homo sapiens and Kromaggs from a common stock. And guess where the name "Kromagg" comes from?
* In ''Series/StargateSG1'', Dr. Daniel Jackson became the laughingstock of the archeological community with his theories that aliens built the pyramids. The premise of the series is that he was, of course, right.



* A notable SpiritualSuccessor, ''Series/{{Fringe}}'' also uses this trope as its premise.
* Ditto the short-lived series ''Series/DarkSkies'', based on [=UFOlogy=] and other 1960s ConspiracyTheory lore.
* In ''Series/{{Sliders}}'', the existence of the Kromaggs (humanoid creatures that evolved instead of ''Homo sapiens'' in various parallel universes) is ascribed to "Killer Ape Theory," a controversial theory in the 1950s about early ''human'' evolution. Notably the real world, Killer Ape Theory tries to explain the divergence between humans and the other apes, while in the show the theory was appropriated to explain the divergence between Homo sapiens and Kromaggs from a common stock. And guess where the name "Kromagg" comes from?
* In ''Series/StargateSG1'', Dr. Daniel Jackson became the laughingstock of the archeological community with his theories that aliens built the pyramids. The premise of the series is that he was, of course, right.



* The ''TabletopGame/{{Spelljammer}}'' setting for second edition TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons, while fantasy, used such ideas as worlds being surrounded by crystal spheres and floating in phlogiston.
* A big part of the [[MadScientist Sons of Ether]] brand in ''TabletopGame/MageTheAscension'' is science that go beyond conventional ideas of the "possible".



* A big part of the [[MadScientist Sons of Ether]] brand in ''TabletopGame/MageTheAscension'' is science that go beyond conventional ideas of the "possible".
* The ''TabletopGame/{{Spelljammer}}'' setting for second edition TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons, while fantasy, used such ideas as worlds being surrounded by crystal spheres and floating in phlogiston.



* In ''RiseOfLegends'', helicopters follow Leonardo Da Vinci's "aerial screw" drawings, long since proven aerodynamically impossible.


Added DiffLines:

* In ''RiseOfLegends'', helicopters follow Leonardo Da Vinci's "aerial screw" drawings, long since proven aerodynamically impossible.
21st Dec '16 11:36:08 PM Spindriver
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* [[LampshadeHanging Lampshaded]] in an issue of Creator/AlanMoore's ''ComicBook/TomStrong'', where the hero and villain reminisce about a 1930s adventure and are disturbed that phlogiston, liquid heat, was real then... despite having since been disproven as a theory. Tom even pointed out at the time that phlogiston's existence is pure conjecture, and doesn't seem to buy that Saveen has discovered it until it almost kills him.
** What was more disturbing was how the villain somehow managed to ''invent'' a way to create phlogiston, despite the idea being bunk.

to:

* [[LampshadeHanging Lampshaded]] in an issue of Creator/AlanMoore's ''ComicBook/TomStrong'', where the hero and villain reminisce about a 1930s adventure and are disturbed that phlogiston, liquid heat, was real then... despite having since been disproven as a theory. Tom even pointed out at the time that phlogiston's existence is pure conjecture, and doesn't seem to buy that Saveen has discovered it until it almost kills him.
**
him. What was more disturbing was how the villain somehow managed to ''invent'' a way to create phlogiston, despite the idea being bunk.



* ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'' has a lot of fun with fringe science. Most notably the way the word "quantum" can be used to justify anything, and the morphogenic field. (''TabletopGame/GURPSDiscworld'' notes that all theories of morphic resonance are true on the Disc, ''including the ones that contradict each other'').
** Not to mention the whole "the world is flat" thing, y'know?

to:

* ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'' has a lot of fun with fringe science. Most notably the way the word "quantum" can be used to justify anything, and the morphogenic field. (''TabletopGame/GURPSDiscworld'' (The ''TabletopGame/DiscworldRoleplayingGame'' notes that all theories of morphic resonance are true on the Disc, ''including the ones that contradict each other'').
**
other''). Not to mention the whole "the world is flat" thing, y'know?
9th Dec '16 1:28:12 PM Doug86
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* For its part, the Franchise/DCUniverse has long relied on the parallel-worlds theory, an inheritance from its prominence TheGoldenAgeOfScienceFiction. Writer Gardner Fox and editor Julius Schwartz were heavily involved in that industry before and while they worked in comics, explaining its use as the spine of the comics' cosmology.

to:

* For its part, the Franchise/DCUniverse Franchise/TheDCU has long relied on the parallel-worlds theory, an inheritance from its prominence TheGoldenAgeOfScienceFiction. Writer Gardner Fox and editor Julius Schwartz were heavily involved in that industry before and while they worked in comics, explaining its use as the spine of the comics' cosmology.
9th Nov '16 8:45:25 AM nombretomado
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* In the Franchise/MarvelUniverse, a number of fringe theories are quite true, including the Counter-Earth idea and the underlying explanation of nearly all non-magical superpowers deriving from JackKirby's use of AncientAstronauts in the 1970s series ''Comicbook/TheEternals''. Similarly, from the 1980s to TheNewTens, TimeTravel obeyed the rules of the many-worlds hypothesis as well.

to:

* In the Franchise/MarvelUniverse, a number of fringe theories are quite true, including the Counter-Earth idea and the underlying explanation of nearly all non-magical superpowers deriving from JackKirby's Creator/JackKirby's use of AncientAstronauts in the 1970s series ''Comicbook/TheEternals''. Similarly, from the 1980s to TheNewTens, TimeTravel obeyed the rules of the many-worlds hypothesis as well.
18th Sep '16 12:55:18 PM eaterofworlds
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[[folder:WesternAnimation]]
* The ''WesternAnimation/JusticeLeague'' episode "Dark Heart" gives us a working example of a Von Neumann machine, an unproven concept in engineering. Unsurprisingly, the episode was written by Warren Ellis, mentioned above in the comic book examples section.

to:

[[folder:WesternAnimation]]
[[folder:WebOriginal]]
* The ''WesternAnimation/JusticeLeague'' episode "Dark Heart" gives us a working example of a Von Neumann machine, an unproven concept in engineering. Unsurprisingly, the episode was written by Warren Ellis, mentioned above in the comic book examples section. SCPFoundation lives and breathes this trope. Not only they're true but they're also terrifying.


Added DiffLines:


[[folder:WesternAnimation]]
* The ''WesternAnimation/JusticeLeague'' episode "Dark Heart" gives us a working example of a Von Neumann machine, an unproven concept in engineering. Unsurprisingly, the episode was written by Warren Ellis, mentioned above in the comic book examples section.
[[/folder]]
14th Aug '16 3:01:56 PM nombretomado
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-->-- ''On Trunks proving time travel in DragonBallZAbridged''

to:

-->-- ''On Trunks proving time travel in DragonBallZAbridged''
WebVideo/DragonBallZAbridged''
5th Aug '16 12:58:08 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* For its part, the DCUniverse has long relied on the parallel-worlds theory, an inheritance from its prominence TheGoldenAgeOfScienceFiction. Writer Gardner Fox and editor Julius Schwartz were heavily involved in that industry before and while they worked in comics, explaining its use as the spine of the comics' cosmology.

to:

* For its part, the DCUniverse Franchise/DCUniverse has long relied on the parallel-worlds theory, an inheritance from its prominence TheGoldenAgeOfScienceFiction. Writer Gardner Fox and editor Julius Schwartz were heavily involved in that industry before and while they worked in comics, explaining its use as the spine of the comics' cosmology.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.AllTheoriesAreTrue