History MagnificentBastard / Literature

8th Sep '17 12:40:57 AM PaulA
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* Nyarlathotep from Creator/HPLovecraft's [[Franchise/CthulhuMythos writings]]: Not only is he a monster, he's the only one of Lovecraft's pantheon that seems to take real interest in actions of humans, which is not a very good thing for humanity. Prime examples include his appearance in ''Dream Quest of Unknown Kadath'', where he gives a [[CharacterFilibuster three-page-long speech]] about how he was never trying to kill the protagonist (his minions just misunderstood him) and, in fact, needs him to go get the Dreamland's gods back to their rightful place in Kadath. He then proceeds to give the protagonist a flying creature that would take him to the Sunset City where the gods now dwell and explicitly warns him from flying too high with it. However, it turns out that [[spoiler:the protagonist has no control over the beast and it is taking him to the court of the great daemon sultan Azathoth (the MadGod that spawned the entire universe, and the most powerful of all the Mythos' entities).]] He barely escapes with his life.

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* Nyarlathotep from Creator/HPLovecraft's [[Franchise/CthulhuMythos writings]]: Not only is he a monster, he's the only one of Lovecraft's pantheon that seems to take real interest in actions of humans, which is not a very good thing for humanity. Prime examples include his appearance in ''Dream Quest of Unknown Kadath'', ''Literature/TheDreamQuestOfUnknownKadath'', where he gives a [[CharacterFilibuster three-page-long speech]] about how he was never trying to kill the protagonist (his minions just misunderstood him) and, in fact, needs him to go get the Dreamland's gods back to their rightful place in Kadath. He then proceeds to give the protagonist a flying creature that would take him to the Sunset City where the gods now dwell and explicitly warns him from flying too high with it. However, it turns out that [[spoiler:the protagonist has no control over the beast and it is taking him to the court of the great daemon sultan Azathoth (the MadGod that spawned the entire universe, and the most powerful of all the Mythos' entities).]] He barely escapes with his life.
30th Aug '17 11:11:47 PM Cartoonfan3
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* Ian Ludlow, from the ''Series/{{Monk}}'' novel, "Mr. Monk and the Two Assistants", who serves as a detective consultant for the Los Angeles Police Department - much the way Adrian Monk consults for the San Francisco Police Department - as well as an acclaimed mystery fiction book author. While Monk's friends think he is simply jealous of Ian Ludlow, it is later revealed that Ludlow is actually a psychopath who writes about his very own murder sprees: He picks out a victim at random, kills them, finds out who the people are in their life, then "volunteers" to serve as consultant for the murder case, where he feeds his own incriminating evidence under the guise of being a brilliant intellect, then makes up his own ending by framing the least likely suspect for the crime. At Natalie's house, while being ransacked by the police, Ludlow arrogantly accuses Sharona and Natalie for two murders Ludlow himself committed, capping off theatrics with a series of twisted, false "Here's What Happened" summations, that ultimately leads to both women's arrest. (Monk ultimately frees Sharona and Natalie once he concludes that Ludlow stole Natalie's credit card to purchase a tool used for one of the murders, and that he had pried into Monk's life and career by doing online research on his various cases throughout the years.)

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* Ian Ludlow, from the ''Series/{{Monk}}'' novel, "Mr. Monk and the Two Assistants", who serves as a detective consultant for the Los Angeles Police Department - much the way Adrian Monk consults for the San Francisco Police Department - as well as an acclaimed mystery fiction book author. While Monk's friends think he is simply jealous of Ian Ludlow, it is later revealed that Ludlow is actually a psychopath who writes about his very own murder sprees: He picks out a victim at random, kills them, finds out who the people are in their life, then "volunteers" to serve as consultant for the murder case, where he feeds his own incriminating evidence under the guise of being a brilliant intellect, then makes up his own ending by framing the least likely suspect for the crime. At Natalie's house, while being ransacked by the police, Ludlow arrogantly accuses Sharona and Natalie for two murders Ludlow himself committed, capping off theatrics with a series of twisted, false "Here's What Happened" summations, that ultimately leads lead to both women's arrest. (Monk ultimately frees Sharona and Natalie once he concludes that Ludlow stole Natalie's credit card to purchase a tool used for one of the murders, and that he had pried into Monk's life and career by doing online research on his various cases throughout the years.)
30th Aug '17 11:08:57 PM Cartoonfan3
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* Ian Ludlow, from the ''Series/{{Monk}}'' novel, "Mr. Monk and the Two Assistants", who serves as a detective consultant for the Los Angeles Police Department - much the way Adrian Monk consults for the San Francisco Police Department, as well as an acclaimed mystery fiction book author. While Monk's friends think he is simply jealous of Ian Ludlow, it is later revealed that Ludlow is actually a psychopath who writes about his very own murder sprees: He picks out a victim at random, kills them, finds out who the people are in their life, then "volunteers" to serve as consultant for the murder case, where he feeds his own incriminating evidence under the guise of being a brilliant intellect, then makes up his own ending by framing the least likely suspect for the crime. At Natalie's house, while being ransacked by the police, Ludlow arrogantly accuses Sharona and Natalie for two murders Ludlow himself committed, capping off theatrics with a series of twisted "Here's What Happened" summations, that ultimately leads to both women's arrest. (Monk ultimately frees Sharona and Natalie once he concludes that Ludlow stole Natalie's credit card to purchase a tool used for one of the murders, and that he had pried into Monk's life and career by doing online research on his various cases throughout the years.)

to:

* Ian Ludlow, from the ''Series/{{Monk}}'' novel, "Mr. Monk and the Two Assistants", who serves as a detective consultant for the Los Angeles Police Department - much the way Adrian Monk consults for the San Francisco Police Department, Department - as well as an acclaimed mystery fiction book author. While Monk's friends think he is simply jealous of Ian Ludlow, it is later revealed that Ludlow is actually a psychopath who writes about his very own murder sprees: He picks out a victim at random, kills them, finds out who the people are in their life, then "volunteers" to serve as consultant for the murder case, where he feeds his own incriminating evidence under the guise of being a brilliant intellect, then makes up his own ending by framing the least likely suspect for the crime. At Natalie's house, while being ransacked by the police, Ludlow arrogantly accuses Sharona and Natalie for two murders Ludlow himself committed, capping off theatrics with a series of twisted twisted, false "Here's What Happened" summations, that ultimately leads to both women's arrest. (Monk ultimately frees Sharona and Natalie once he concludes that Ludlow stole Natalie's credit card to purchase a tool used for one of the murders, and that he had pried into Monk's life and career by doing online research on his various cases throughout the years.)
30th Aug '17 11:07:22 PM Cartoonfan3
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* Ian Ludlow, from the ''Series/{{Monk}}'' novel, "Mr. Monk and the Two Assistants", who serves as a detective consultant for the Los Angeles Police Department - much the way Adrian Monk consults for the San Francisco Police Department, as well as an acclaimed mystery fiction book author. While Monk's friends think he is simply jealous of Ian Ludlow, it is later revealed that Ludlow is actually a psychopath who writes about his very own murder sprees: He picks out a victim at random, kills them, finds out who the people are in their life, then "volunteers" to serve as consultant for the murder case, where he feeds his own incriminating evidence under the guise of being a brilliant intellect, then makes up his own ending by framing the least likely suspect for the crime. At Natalie's house, while being ransacked by the police, Ludlow arrogantly accuses Sharona and Natalie for two murders Ludlow himself committed, capping off theatrics with a series of twisted "Here's What Happened" summations, that ultimately leads to both women's arrest. (Monk ultimately frees Sharona and Natalie once he concludes that Ludlow stole Natalie's credit card to purchase a tool used for one of the murders, and that he had pried into Monk's life and career by doing online research on his various cases throughout the years.)
25th Aug '17 4:59:19 AM ANTMuddle
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** Speaking of Grisham works, ''The Appeal'' definitely qualifies. A legendary corporate predator Carl Trudeau with three billion of his own in assets, Carl Trudeau is blindsided by the verdict handed down against a chemical company in which he is the main stockholder. So he devises a simple yet brilliant plan to get back at the small-town lawyers who were willing to take it on. One component is when he buys out the bank from which the trial lawyers get their loans, which will then get called and so force them to declare bankruptcy and turn away other clients. When the case finally reaches state Supreme Court, the senator whose fun he is funding goes in to work the justice whose campaign the case is the basis for. The icing on the cake? The little Mississippi town has no clue it is the shareholder, not the firm, that destroyed them. All because he was driven off the Forbes list of richest Americans.
22nd Aug '17 1:08:32 PM ArgonianLorekeeper
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** Many people forget that Melkor/Morgoth, the original Dark Lord, once qualified before he squandered his power and knowledge. In the beginning he was the second most powerful being in existence other than {{God}}. After he disrupted the song of creation in an attempt to glorify himself, he seduced many lesser spirits to his side. He was able to fight off the other Valar for years after entering the world, taking a colossal, majestic, and terrifying form. When he was finally captured, he feigned repentance in order to be let out. When he was, he went among the Noldor Elves spreading lies and dissent while appearing beautiful and friendly. By the time he was caught, he corrupted and divided the Elves so far that a centuries-long HopelessWar followed. Even afterwards many characters, even elves, still fell for his tricks.

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** Many people forget that Melkor/Morgoth, the original Dark Lord, once qualified before he squandered his power and knowledge. In the beginning he was the second most powerful being in existence other than {{God}}.[[TopGod Eru Ilúvatar]]. After he disrupted the song of creation in an attempt to glorify himself, he seduced many lesser spirits to his side. He was able to fight off the other Valar for years after entering the world, taking a colossal, majestic, and terrifying form. When he was finally captured, he feigned repentance in order to be let out. When he was, he went among the Noldor Elves spreading lies and dissent while appearing beautiful and friendly. By the time he was caught, he corrupted and divided the Elves so far that a centuries-long HopelessWar followed. Even afterwards many characters, even elves, still fell for his tricks.



22nd Aug '17 1:03:25 PM ArgonianLorekeeper
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* Can't believe that Marc C. DuQuesne of E.E. Smith's ''Literature/SkylarkSeries'' hasn't been mentioned yet. He practically defines the trope.
22nd Aug '17 1:01:07 PM ArgonianLorekeeper
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** Fëanor from ''Literature/TheSilmarillion'' should probably qualify. He does some very despicable stuff but is so charismatic that most of his people, many of them otherwise fairly decent, follow him for a while.

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** Fëanor from ''Literature/TheSilmarillion'' should probably qualify.''Literature/TheSilmarillion''. He does some very despicable stuff but is so charismatic that most of his people, many of them otherwise fairly decent, follow him for a while.
2nd Jul '17 11:11:59 AM Ferot_Dreadnaught
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* From ''Literature/{{Warbreaker}}'', [[spoiler: Denth, DragonWithAnAgenda to the GovernmentConspiracy. So AffablyEvil that he has one of the main characters totally convinced he's a good guy despite being a mercenary who keeps company with a PsychoForHire, a {{Jerkass}} and a zombie; uses said main character as part of a plot to utterly destabilize the government while keeping her completely in the dark about his real intentions, and as he is ReallySevenHundredYearsOld he's ridiculously GenreSavvy.]]

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* From ''Literature/{{Warbreaker}}'', [[spoiler: Denth, DragonWithAnAgenda to the GovernmentConspiracy. So AffablyEvil that he has one of the main characters totally convinced he's a good guy despite being a mercenary who keeps company with a PsychoForHire, a {{Jerkass}} and a zombie; uses said main character as part of a plot to utterly destabilize the government while keeping her completely in the dark about his real intentions, and as he is ReallySevenHundredYearsOld he's ridiculously GenreSavvy.experienced.]]
19th Mar '17 7:34:14 PM REllrod
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* Can't believe that Marc C. DuQuesne of E.E. Smith's ''Literature/SkylarkSeries'' hasn't been mentioned yet. He practically defines the trope.
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