History Literature / RagnarLodbrokAndHisSons

22nd Nov '16 2:44:10 AM TheAmazingBlachman
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[[caption-width-right:350: "King Aella's messenger before Ragnar Lodbrok's sons", by August Malmström (1857)]]

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[[caption-width-right:350: "King Aella's Ælla's messenger before Ragnar Lodbrok's sons", by August Malmström (1857)]]



* DefiantCaptive: Captured by the Northumbrians, Ragnar refuses to tell Aella who he is, or indeed speak to him at all. Even when Aella has him thrown into a snake pit to make him talk, Ragnar continues to ignore him.

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* DefiantCaptive: Captured by the Northumbrians, Ragnar refuses to tell Aella Ælla who he is, or indeed speak to him at all. Even when Aella Ælla has him thrown into a snake pit to make him talk, Ragnar continues to ignore him.him.
* DefiantToTheEnd: As Ragnar lies dying in Ælla's snake pit his FamousLastWords are: "How the little pigs would grunt if they knew how the old boar suffers!", referring to how his sons are not going to take his death lightly.



* FeelNoPain: When Aella's messenger relates Ragnar's death to the Ragnarssons, Sigurd is paring his fingernails with a knife. He listens to the messenger so attentively (and presumably, is so worked up internally) he does not notice he is cutting into his own flesh "until the knife stood in the bone, and he did not flinch at that."

to:

* FeelNoPain: When Aella's Ælla's messenger relates Ragnar's death to the Ragnarssons, Sigurd is paring his fingernails with a knife. He listens to the messenger so attentively (and presumably, is so worked up internally) he does not notice he is cutting into his own flesh "until the knife stood in the bone, and he did not flinch at that."
21st Sep '16 6:37:34 PM ecuvulle6267
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Added DiffLines:

* TheLowMiddleAges: Set in a fictionalized 9th century.
21st Sep '16 10:20:45 AM LordGro
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%%* DeliberateValuesDissonance: This was undoubtedly relished by the author.

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%%* * DeliberateValuesDissonance: This was undoubtedly relished by When the author. teenager Rognvald is killed on his very first viking expedition, his mother Aslaug does not mourn him, because she considers his death honorable, and (she thinks) he could not have expected more from life.
-->"And I cannot see," she said, "that he could have lived to a greater honor."
29th Aug '16 1:03:44 PM LordGro
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Ragnar Lodbrok and his sons were popular stuff of legend of medieval Northern Europe; however the details of the story vary considerably-– especially the number and names of the sons. Nevertheless, many of the episodes are obviously [[VeryLooselyBasedOnATrueStory based on history]]: Ragnar may be inspired by a certain viking warlord Reginer who sacked Paris in 845, Ivar the Boneless is modelled on a certain "Hinguar"[[note]]A Latinization of "Ingvar", Ivar for short.[[/note]] who, together with his brothers, invaded England in 865, and the Ragnarssons’ foray to the South mirrors a real-life viking invasion of the Mediterranean that occurred in 859-862. Altogether, the saga is cleverly stitched between the age of legend and history--while the Ragnarssons are descended from mythic heroes, they are also (supposedly) the ancestors of the historical royal houses of UsefulNotes/{{Norway}}, Denmark and Sweden. For more, sometimes conflicting material on the tale of Ragnar, see book 9 of ''Literature/GestaDanorum'' and "Literature/TheTaleOfNornaGest".

to:

Ragnar Lodbrok and his sons were popular stuff of legend of medieval Northern Europe; however the details of the story vary considerably-– especially the number and names of the sons. Nevertheless, many of the episodes are obviously [[VeryLooselyBasedOnATrueStory based on history]]: Ragnar may be inspired by a certain viking warlord Reginer who sacked Paris in 845, Ivar the Boneless is modelled on a certain "Hinguar"[[note]]A Latinization of "Ingvar", Ivar for short.[[/note]] who, together with his brothers, invaded England in 865, and the Ragnarssons’ foray to the South mirrors a real-life viking invasion of the Mediterranean that occurred in 859-862. Altogether, the saga is cleverly stitched between the age of legend and history--while the Ragnarssons are descended from mythic heroes, they are also (supposedly) the ancestors of the historical royal houses of UsefulNotes/{{Norway}}, Denmark and Sweden. For more, sometimes conflicting material on the tale of Ragnar, see book 9 of ''Literature/GestaDanorum'' ''Literature/GestaDanorum'', "Literature/{{Krakumal}}", and "Literature/TheTaleOfNornaGest".
29th Aug '16 12:59:47 PM LordGro
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[[quoteright:300:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/RagnarLodbrok_6748.jpg]]
[[caption-width-right:300: [- "Death of Ragnar Lodbrok" by Hugo Hamilton (1830) -] ]]

The '''''Saga of Ragnar Lodbrok''''' (''Ragnars saga loðbrókar'') and '''''Tale of Ragnar’s Sons''''' ("Ragnarssona þáttr") are two 13th century [[Literature/TheIcelandicSagas Icelandic sagas]], telling the story of a prestigious clan of enterprising warlord-kings, set in a fictionalised 9th century, in the heyday of the [[HornyVikings viking raids]]. The authorship is [[AnonymousAuthor anonymous]]. Despite what the titles suggest, the two works are not {{sequel}}s, rather different treatments of the same story, but with a shift in emphasis, and also a few inconsistencies between them. The "Tale" is much shorter than the ''Saga''.

to:

[[quoteright:300:http://static.[[quoteright:350:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/RagnarLodbrok_6748.org/pmwiki/pub/images/ragnarssons_amalmstrom1857.jpg]]
[[caption-width-right:300: [- "Death [[caption-width-right:350: "King Aella's messenger before Ragnar Lodbrok's sons", by August Malmström (1857)]]

The ''Saga
of Ragnar Lodbrok" by Hugo Hamilton (1830) -] ]]

The '''''Saga of Ragnar Lodbrok'''''
Lodbrok'' (''Ragnars saga loðbrókar'') and '''''Tale "Tale of Ragnar’s Sons''''' Sons" ("Ragnarssona þáttr") are two 13th century [[Literature/TheIcelandicSagas Icelandic sagas]], telling the story of a prestigious clan of enterprising warlord-kings, set in a fictionalised 9th century, in the heyday of the [[HornyVikings viking raids]]. The authorship is [[AnonymousAuthor anonymous]]. Despite what the titles suggest, the two works are not {{sequel}}s, rather different treatments of the same story, but with a shift in emphasis, and also a few inconsistencies between them. The "Tale" is much shorter than the ''Saga''.
28th Aug '16 10:38:39 AM LordGro
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The '''''Saga of Ragnar Lodbrok''''' (''Ragnars saga loðbrókar'') and '''''Tale of Ragnar’s Sons''''' ("Ragnarssona þáttr") are two [[TheHighMiddleAges 13th century]] [[Literature/TheIcelandicSagas Icelandic narratives]], telling the story of a prestigious clan of enterprising warlord-kings, set in [[InspiredBy a fictionalised 9th century]], in the heyday of the [[HornyVikings viking raids]]. The authorship is [[AnonymousAuthor anonymous]]. Despite what the titles suggest, the two narratives are not {{sequel}}s, rather different treatments of the same story, but with a shift in emphasis, and also a few inconsistencies between them. The "Tale" is much shorter than the ''Saga''.

Ragnar succeeds his father as king of UsefulNotes/{{Sweden}} and UsefulNotes/{{Denmark}}. While he is still a youngster, he kills a [[OurDragonsAreDifferent giant snake]], wearing special clothes made of fur for protection, which earns him his rid … ''unique'' nickname Lodbrok (a.k.a. Lothbrok or Lodbrog, depending on transliteration) -- "Hairy-Breeches"[[note]]Or "Shaggy-pants" if you want so. There are numerous translations of ''Loðbrók'' but most often it's left untranslated, for obvious reasons.[[/note]] -- and also the [[EverythingsBetterWithPrincesses jarl’s daughter]] that the monster guarded, Thora Hart-of-the-Town[[note]]The "hart" is supposed to mean that she is especially beautiful.[[/note]].

But Thora dies young, and Ragnar takes another wife – Kraka, a mysterious girl raised by a poor couple, who will eventually reveal a lofty heritage. Thora’s sons are Erik and Agnar; Kraka’s sons are [[AwesomeMcCoolName Ivar the Boneless, Bjorn Ironside, Hvitserk, Rognvald, and Sigurd Snake-in-the-Eye.]] In time, the sons follow in the footsteps of their father and take up careers as viking raiders and conquerors -- and soon, father and sons find themselves competing against each other in a quest for glory that ravages half of Europe, drips of blood, and entertains the reader.

Ragnar Lodbrok and his sons were popular stuff of legend of medieval Northern Europe; however the details of the story vary considerably – especially the number and names of the sons. Nevertheless, many of the episodes are obviously [[VeryLooselyBasedOnATrueStory based on history]]: Ragnar is implied to be identical to a certain viking warlord Reginer who sacked Paris in 845, Ivar the Boneless is modelled on a certain "Hinguar"[[note]]A Latinization of "Ingvar", Ivar for short.[[/note]] who, together with his brothers, invaded England in 865, and the Ragnarssons’ foray to the South mirrors a real-life viking invasion of the Mediterranean that occurred in 859-862. Altogether, the saga is cleverly stitched between the age of legend and history – while the Ragnarssons are descended from mythic heroes, they are also (supposedly) the ancestors of the historical royal houses of UsefulNotes/{{Norway}}, Denmark and Sweden. For more, sometimes conflicting material on the tale of Ragnar, see book 9 of ''Literature/GestaDanorum'' and "Literature/TheTaleOfNornaGest".

to:

The '''''Saga of Ragnar Lodbrok''''' (''Ragnars saga loðbrókar'') and '''''Tale of Ragnar’s Sons''''' ("Ragnarssona þáttr") are two [[TheHighMiddleAges 13th century]] century [[Literature/TheIcelandicSagas Icelandic narratives]], sagas]], telling the story of a prestigious clan of enterprising warlord-kings, set in [[InspiredBy a fictionalised 9th century]], century, in the heyday of the [[HornyVikings viking raids]]. The authorship is [[AnonymousAuthor anonymous]]. Despite what the titles suggest, the two narratives works are not {{sequel}}s, rather different treatments of the same story, but with a shift in emphasis, and also a few inconsistencies between them. The "Tale" is much shorter than the ''Saga''.

Ragnar succeeds his father as king of UsefulNotes/{{Sweden}} and UsefulNotes/{{Denmark}}. While he is still a youngster, he kills a [[OurDragonsAreDifferent giant snake]], wearing special clothes made of fur for protection, which earns him his rid … ''unique'' unique nickname Lodbrok ''Loðbrók'' (a.k.a. Lothbrok Lodbrok, Lothbrok, or Lodbrog, depending on transliteration) -- "Hairy-Breeches"[[note]]Or "Shaggy-pants" if you want so. transliteration)--"Hairy-Breeches"[[note]]Or "Shaggy-pants". There are numerous translations of ''Loðbrók'' but most often it's it is left untranslated, for obvious reasons.[[/note]] -- and untranslated.[[/note]]--and also the [[EverythingsBetterWithPrincesses jarl’s daughter]] that the monster guarded, Thora Hart-of-the-Town[[note]]The "hart" is supposed to mean that she is especially beautiful.[[/note]].

Hart-of-the-Town.

But Thora dies young, and Ragnar takes another wife – Kraka, wife--Kraka, a mysterious girl raised by a poor couple, who will eventually reveal a lofty heritage. Thora’s sons are Erik and Agnar; Kraka’s sons are [[AwesomeMcCoolName Ivar the Boneless, Bjorn Ironside, Hvitserk, Rognvald, and Sigurd Snake-in-the-Eye.]] In time, the sons follow in the footsteps of their father and take up careers as viking raiders and conquerors -- and conquerors--and soon, father and sons find themselves competing against each other in a quest for glory that ravages half of Europe, drips of blood, and entertains the reader.

Ragnar Lodbrok and his sons were popular stuff of legend of medieval Northern Europe; however the details of the story vary considerably – considerably-– especially the number and names of the sons. Nevertheless, many of the episodes are obviously [[VeryLooselyBasedOnATrueStory based on history]]: Ragnar is implied to may be identical to inspired by a certain viking warlord Reginer who sacked Paris in 845, Ivar the Boneless is modelled on a certain "Hinguar"[[note]]A Latinization of "Ingvar", Ivar for short.[[/note]] who, together with his brothers, invaded England in 865, and the Ragnarssons’ foray to the South mirrors a real-life viking invasion of the Mediterranean that occurred in 859-862. Altogether, the saga is cleverly stitched between the age of legend and history – while history--while the Ragnarssons are descended from mythic heroes, they are also (supposedly) the ancestors of the historical royal houses of UsefulNotes/{{Norway}}, Denmark and Sweden. For more, sometimes conflicting material on the tale of Ragnar, see book 9 of ''Literature/GestaDanorum'' and "Literature/TheTaleOfNornaGest".
24th Aug '16 4:57:14 AM LordGro
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Added DiffLines:

* FeelNoPain: When Aella's messenger relates Ragnar's death to the Ragnarssons, Sigurd is paring his fingernails with a knife. He listens to the messenger so attentively (and presumably, is so worked up internally) he does not notice he is cutting into his own flesh "until the knife stood in the bone, and he did not flinch at that."
23rd Aug '16 1:43:12 PM LordGro
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Added DiffLines:

* SlainInTheirSleep: Urged on by his wife Grima, Aki murders their guest Heimir by striking him with an axe while he sleeps.
15th Apr '16 12:42:23 PM LordGro
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* DefiantCaptive: Captured by the Northumbrians, Ragnar refuses to tell Aella who he is, or indeed speak to him at all. Even when Aella has him thrown into a snake pit to make him talk, Ragnar continues to ignore him.



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21st Feb '16 1:06:26 PM Smeagol17
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The '''''Saga of Ragnar Lodbrok''''' (''Ragnars saga loðbrókar'') and '''"Tale of Ragnar’s Sons"''' ("Ragnarssona þáttr") are two [[TheHighMiddleAges 13th century]] [[Literature/TheIcelandicSagas Icelandic narratives]], telling the story of a prestigious clan of enterprising warlord-kings, set in [[InspiredBy a fictionalised 9th century]], in the heyday of the [[HornyVikings viking raids]]. The authorship is [[AnonymousAuthor anonymous]]. Despite what the titles suggest, the two narratives are not {{sequel}}s, rather different treatments of the same story, but with a shift in emphasis, and also a few inconsistencies between them. The "Tale" is much shorter than the ''Saga''.

to:

The '''''Saga of Ragnar Lodbrok''''' (''Ragnars saga loðbrókar'') and '''"Tale '''''Tale of Ragnar’s Sons"''' Sons''''' ("Ragnarssona þáttr") are two [[TheHighMiddleAges 13th century]] [[Literature/TheIcelandicSagas Icelandic narratives]], telling the story of a prestigious clan of enterprising warlord-kings, set in [[InspiredBy a fictionalised 9th century]], in the heyday of the [[HornyVikings viking raids]]. The authorship is [[AnonymousAuthor anonymous]]. Despite what the titles suggest, the two narratives are not {{sequel}}s, rather different treatments of the same story, but with a shift in emphasis, and also a few inconsistencies between them. The "Tale" is much shorter than the ''Saga''.
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