History Literature / Night

22nd Aug '16 7:12:36 PM stuffedninja
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--> ''When he said Jesus again I couldn't take it, and for the only time in my life I was discourteous, which I regret to this day. I said, "Mr. Mauriac . . . ten years or so ago, I have seen children, hundreds of Jewish children, who suffered more than Jesus did on his cross and we do not speak about it." I felt all of a sudden so embarrassed. I closed my notebook and went to the elevator. He ran after me. He pulled me back; he sat down in his chair, and I in mine, and he began weeping. I have rarely seen an old man weep like that, and I felt like such an idiot . . . And then, at the end, without saying anything, he simply said, "You know, maybe you should talk about it."''

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--> -> ''When he said Jesus again I couldn't take it, and for the only time in my life I was discourteous, which I regret to this day. I said, "Mr. Mauriac . . . ten years or so ago, I have seen children, hundreds of Jewish children, who suffered more than Jesus did on his cross and we do not speak about it." I felt all of a sudden so embarrassed. I closed my notebook and went to the elevator. He ran after me. He pulled me back; he sat down in his chair, and I in mine, and he began weeping. I have rarely seen an old man weep like that, and I felt like such an idiot . . . And then, at the end, without saying anything, he simply said, "You know, maybe you should talk about it."''
3rd Jul '16 4:11:49 PM Awsamazing
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* GenreBusting: Is it a novel, a memoir, semi-autobiographical, nonfictional, or something different? The world may never know.

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* GenreBusting: Is it a novel, a memoir, semi-autobiographical, nonfictional, or something different? The With Wiesel's death, the world may never know.
3rd Jul '16 4:05:29 PM Awsamazing
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* BasedOnATrueStory: It's not entirely clear how much of the book is based on actual events. Wiesel himself has said that "Some events do take place but are not true; others are, although they never occurred," and he tends to get offended when people call it fiction.

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* BasedOnATrueStory: It's not entirely clear how much of the book is based on actual events. Wiesel himself has said that "Some events do take place but are not true; others are, although they never occurred," and he tends to get offended when people call it fiction.



** [[WordOfGod Elie has said]] that this represents his state of mind during and following the Holocaust, and how everything [[BookEnds ends up coming right back to night]].[[note]]This also ties into the Jewish tradition that new days begin at nightfall.[[/note]]

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** [[WordOfGod Elie has had said]] that this represents represented his state of mind during and following the Holocaust, and how everything [[BookEnds ends up coming right back to night]].[[note]]This also ties into the Jewish tradition that new days begin at nightfall.[[/note]]
14th Mar '16 6:07:32 PM stuffedninja
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* BittersweetEnding[=/=]DownerEnding: Depends on your interpretation. [[spoiler:The camp is liberated and Eliezer survives, at the cost of his father's life.]] But at the very end, when Eliezer stares in a mirror, he realizes how much the experience has dehumanized him despite the liberation.

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* BittersweetEnding[=/=]DownerEnding: Depends on your interpretation. [[spoiler:The camp BittersweetEnding: Shifts very, ''very'' much towards the "bitter" side. Buchenwald is liberated and Eliezer survives, although not without extreme loss and most specifically (and recently) at the cost of his father's life.]] life. But at the very end, when Eliezer stares in a mirror, he realizes how much the experience has dehumanized him despite the liberation.



* TropeCodifier: Both this book and ''Literature/TheDiaryOfAYoungGirl'' are considered to be classic examples of Holocaust literature.
14th Mar '16 6:05:01 PM stuffedninja
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On April 11, 1945, the Buchenwald concentration camp was liberated, and among the freed inmates was a young man named Elie Wiesel. He had lost his father, his mother, and one of his sisters. For a decade he worked as a journalist and refused to even discuss UsefulNotes/TheHolocaust. In 1954, he poured his experiences into a Yiddish book that was originally [[{{Doorstopper}} over 800 pages long]][[note]]that was just the manuscript; thankfully, it received quite some compression into just 245 pages[[/note]] and called ''And the World Remained Silent''. However, the public was generally apathetic. Then in 1955, he interviewed the Christian (and Christ-obsessed) novelist Francois Mauriac, with the results described in the page quote, and with Mauriac's help he published a greatly abridged edition in France, then America, calling it ''La Nuit'' or ''Night''.

Wiesel's story is now a smidgen over 100 pages long, but it is just as powerful as a 500-page Holocaust story, and is considered to be among the likes of ''Literature/TheDiaryOfAYoungGirl'' as [[TropeCodifier a quintessential work of Holocaust literature]].

It's a novel--er, a memoir--no, an autobiography--um, a nonfiction story--eh, [[GenreBusting this book doesn't really fit into one genre]]. This story is based off of [[AuthorAvatar Eliezer]] (or some semi-fictionalization) and his father Shlomo, and their experiences in Birkenau, Auschwitz and Buchenwald.

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On April 11, 1945, the Buchenwald concentration camp was liberated, and among the freed inmates was a young man named Elie Wiesel. He had lost his father, his mother, and one of his sisters. For a decade he worked as a journalist and refused to even discuss UsefulNotes/TheHolocaust. In 1954, he poured his experiences into a Yiddish book that was originally [[{{Doorstopper}} over 800 almost 900 pages long]][[note]]that was just the manuscript; thankfully, it received quite some compression into just 245 pages[[/note]] and called ''And the World Remained Silent''. However, the public was generally apathetic. apathetic to it.

Then in 1955, he interviewed the Christian (and Christ-obsessed) novelist Francois Mauriac, with the results described in the page quote, and with Mauriac's help he published a greatly abridged edition in France, then America, calling it ''La Nuit'' or ''Night''.

Wiesel's story is now a smidgen
''Night''. The book has been translated into over 100 pages long, but it is just as powerful as a 500-page Holocaust story, 30 languages and is considered to be among the likes of ''Literature/TheDiaryOfAYoungGirl'' as [[TropeCodifier a quintessential work and a cornerstone of Holocaust literature]].

literature.

It's a novel--er, a memoir--no, an autobiography--um, a nonfiction story--eh, [[GenreBusting this book doesn't really fit neatly into one genre]].of these genres]], and there's still lots of debate over how much of this book is memoir, and scholars still have trouble trying to approach it as a straightforward account. This story is based off of [[AuthorAvatar Eliezer]] (or some semi-fictionalization) and his father Shlomo, and their experiences in Birkenau, Auschwitz and Buchenwald.
20th Jan '16 9:54:21 PM FlakyPorcupine
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Added DiffLines:

* InfantImmortality: Averted thoroughly. Starting in the ''very first chapter'', we hear of babies being used as target practice for the SS soldiers. Then we see children being shot, thrown into fire-pits, hanged...
31st Oct '15 7:48:18 AM Prfnoff
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* FriendToAllChildren: Josef Mengele plays himself up as this. Subverted, given that he was Josef Mengele and had a ''[[PlayingWithSyringes reason]]'' for being so outwardly nice to the children.

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* FriendToAllChildren: Josef Mengele UsefulNotes/JosefMengele plays himself up as this. Subverted, given that he was Josef Mengele and had a ''[[PlayingWithSyringes reason]]'' for being so outwardly nice to the children.
7th Oct '15 2:06:56 PM rjd1922
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* ActuallyPrettyFunny: Eliezer can't help but laugh at the absurdity of the SS officer Idek moving a hundred prisoners to have sex with a girl. Unfortunately, Idek heard this and [[ATasteOfTheLash punished Eliezer for it]].

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* ActuallyPrettyFunny: Eliezer can't help but laugh at the absurdity of the SS officer Idek moving a hundred prisoners just to have sex with a girl. Unfortunately, Idek heard this and [[ATasteOfTheLash punished Eliezer for it]].
26th Jun '15 2:40:20 PM rjd1922
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Added DiffLines:

* ActuallyPrettyFunny: Eliezer can't help but laugh at the absurdity of the SS officer Idek moving a hundred prisoners to have sex with a girl. Unfortunately, Idek heard this and [[ATasteOfTheLash punished Eliezer for it]].
20th Mar '15 12:23:06 AM Thurisaz314
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Literature.Night