History Literature / JeevesAndWooster

19th May '18 10:09:15 AM needsanewhobby
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* FirstWorldProblems: A shining example, [[TropesAreNotBad in a very good way]]. The inhabitants of the Jeeves and Wooster universe are hugely rich without having to work for it, and nobody is ever in serious danger. Even relationship troubles are strictly angst-free.

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* FirstWorldProblems: A shining example, But [[TropesAreNotBad in a very good way]]. The inhabitants of the Jeeves and Wooster universe are hugely rich without having to work for it, and nobody is ever in serious danger. Even relationship troubles are strictly angst-free.angst-free, and exclusively caused by social misunderstandings rather than abuse or adultery.
16th May '18 5:01:13 AM jamespolk
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* PerspectiveFlip: "Bertie Changes His Mind" is the only story narrated by Jeeves.
16th May '18 12:13:54 AM jamespolk
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* CompromisingMemoirs: Sir Watkin writes his Memoirs and several parties take offense at the depiction of the now respectable pillars of society as the kind of roaring youths that would not have gone out of place in the Drones Club. Oddly enough, this does not include most of the people so depicted, who seem to like the idea that the youth may realise that they too were young once.

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* CompromisingMemoirs: Sir Watkin Watkyn writes his Memoirs and several parties take offense at the depiction of the now respectable pillars of society as the kind of roaring youths that would not have gone out of place in the Drones Club. Oddly enough, this does not include most of the people so depicted, who seem to like the idea that the youth may realise that they too were young once.



** Many of the early short stories were actually serials with continuing story arcs. In "Scoring off Jeeves", published in February 1922, Bertie winds up blundering into an engagement with Honoria Glossop. In "Sir Roderick Comes to Lunch", published a month later, he's still engaged to Honoria and wondering how to get out of it. "Aunt Agatha Takes the Count", the next story published after that, finds Bertie vacationing on the coast of France, hiding from Aunt Agatha's wrath after Jeeves got him out of the engagement to Honoria. tle.

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** Many of the early short stories were actually serials with continuing story arcs. In "Scoring off Jeeves", published in February 1922, Bertie winds up blundering into an engagement with Honoria Glossop. In "Sir Roderick Comes to Lunch", published a month later, he's still engaged to Honoria and wondering how to get out of it. "Aunt Agatha Takes the Count", the next story published after that, finds Bertie vacationing on the coast of France, hiding from Aunt Agatha's wrath after Jeeves got him out of the engagement to Honoria. tle.



* DarkSecret: Jeeves reveals wannabe Fascist leader Roderick Spode's terrible secret to Bertie: Spode [[spoiler: also owns a popular ladies' lingerie boutique]]. Even Bertie quickly catches on to the possibilities for blackmail.
--> '''Bertie''': You can't be a successful Dictator and [[spoiler:design womens' underclothing]]. One or the other. Not both.



* HangingJudge: Madeline's father, Sir Watkyn Bassett, an ex-Magistrate who once presided over Bertie's sentencing hearing for stealing a policeman's helmet on Boat Race Night. Though Bertie escaped with a small fine, the incident planted a seed of paranoia in Bassett, who on their next meeting some years later remembers "the prisoner Wooster" as a nefarious archvillain... a misunderstanding not exactly cleared by the fact Bertie's only visiting his home in the first place in order to steal his cow-creamer... [[HypocriticalHumour which Watkyn stole first.]]



* RansackedRoom: In ''The Code of the Woosters'', Stiffy Byng has hidden a notebook (long story) in order to blackmail Bertie into going along with her schemes. Bertie insists to Jeeves that they should search her room before capitulating, because Bertie has read a detective novel which claims that the top of the wardrobe is "every woman's favourite hiding-place". Unfortunately in this case it isn't, and indeed they don't get much further in the ransacking before Stiffy's bad-tempered terrier discovers them.



* TheReasonYouSuckSpeech: In ''The Code of the Woosters'', Bertie delivers one to Spode regarding how laughable his posturing as a fascist dictator wannabee really is.



---> And presently the eyes closed, the muscles relaxed, the breathing became soft and regular, and sleep which does something which has slipped my mind to the something sleeve of care poured over me in a healing wave.

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---> And presently the eyes closed, the muscles relaxed, the breathing became soft and regular, and sleep which does something which has slipped my mind to the something sleeve of care poured over me in a healing wave.[[note]]The last line of ''



* WhoWatchesTheWatchmen: DiscussedTrope in ''The Code of the Woosters'', when Bertie muses on a policeman who had his hat stolen. He even quotes the Latin.
15th May '18 11:02:31 PM jamespolk
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* ''The Code of the Woosters'' (1938)

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* ''The Code of the Woosters'' ''Literature/TheCodeOfTheWoosters'' (1938)


Added DiffLines:

* ''Literature/TheCodeOfTheWoosters''
2nd May '18 9:20:44 AM jamespolk
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* ''Literature/JoyInTheMorning''



* AltumVidetur: Bertie sometimes quotes Latin tags, usually of the schoolboy variety, quite unnecessarily. Jeeves's are usually more apposite, but he isn't above showing off either. From ''Joy in the Morning'':
--> '''Jeeves''': Precisely, sir. ''Rem acu tetigisti''.\\
'''Bertie''': ''Rem--''?\\
'''Jeeves''': ''Acu tetigisti'', sir. A Latin expression, literally meaning "you have touched the matter with a needle". A more idiomatic rendering would be--\\
'''Bertie''': Put my finger on the nub?\\
'''Jeeves''': Exactly, sir.



* ChildrenAreInnocent: Subverted at every opportunity -- if a child appears in a Wodehouse story, nine times out of ten he (it's usually a he) will be an [[BrattyHalfPint obnoxious grubby little pest]]. Exemplified by Edwin Craye, the eager Boy Scout from ''Joy in the Morning''; at one point his attempt to "catch up" on his daily good deeds results in a house burning to the ground (without him in it, unfortunately enough from Bertie's point of view). Later, Bertie's scheme to break up with Edwin's sister by kicking the kid in the backside backfires when it turns out she ''and'' her father have also been victims of these 'good deeds', and are profoundly grateful to Bertie.

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* ChildrenAreInnocent: Subverted at every opportunity -- if a child appears in a Wodehouse story, nine times out of ten he (it's usually a he) will be an [[BrattyHalfPint obnoxious grubby little pest]]. Exemplified by Edwin Craye, the eager Boy Scout from ''Joy in the Morning''; at one point his attempt to "catch up" on his daily good deeds results in a house burning to the ground (without him in it, unfortunately enough from Bertie's point of view). Later, Bertie's scheme to break up with Edwin's sister by kicking the kid in the backside backfires when it turns out she ''and'' her father have also been victims of these 'good deeds', and are profoundly grateful to Bertie.



** In ''Joy in the Morning'', Bertie remembers having to sneak out and ring the fire bell at Aunt Dahlia's place--the plot of ''Right Ho, Jeeves''.



* TheDitz: Bertie Wooster, as he himself cheerfully admits in short story "Leave it to Jeeves".
--> "I'm a bit short on brain myself."

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* TheDitz: Bertie Wooster, as he himself cheerfully admits in short story "Leave it to Jeeves".
--> "I'm
Jeeves"--"I'm a bit short on brain myself."



* EatTheRich: In one short stored named ''Comrade Bingo'', one of Bertie's IdleRich friends is in love with the daughter of a communist revolutionary. He disguises himself and gives speeches with a very Eat the Rich bent to them:

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* EatTheRich: In one short stored named ''Comrade Bingo'', one of story, "Comrade Bingo", Bertie's IdleRich friends friend Bingo is in love with the daughter of a communist revolutionary. He disguises himself and gives speeches with a very Eat the Rich bent to them:



* EnterStageWindow: In ''Joy in the Morning'' Bertie climbs though Boko's window, rather than entering through the door, because...well, he just does.



* GoneSwimmingClothesStolen: An unusual variant in ''Joy in the Morning'', when Jeeves steals Stilton Cheesewright's police uniform, so Bertie will have a costume for the costume ball.
* GoshDarnItToHeck: Bertie, who never uses bad words, is often forced to use complex circumlocutions in order to describe the cursing of other people.
--> "Her first observation was that L.P. Runkle was an illegitimate offspring to end all illegitimate offsprings." (''Much Obliged, Jeeves'')



* LivingMacGuffin: Anatole, the magnificent French cook, who is first stolen from Rosie and Bingo by Aunt Dahlia. Later, other people keep trying to steal Anatole away from her.



* {{MacGuffin}}: The most famous is the seventeenth-century English (''not'' Modern Dutch!) silver cow-creamer, the attempted theft of which starts off an entire multi-book uproar in Bertie's love life. The French chef Anatole often serves as a LivingMacGuffin.

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* {{MacGuffin}}: The most famous is the seventeenth-century English (''not'' Modern Dutch!) silver cow-creamer, the attempted theft of which starts off an entire multi-book uproar in Bertie's love life. The French chef Anatole often serves as a LivingMacGuffin.



* NarrativeProfanityFilter: Bertie, who never uses bad words, is often forced to use complex circumlocutions in order to describe the cursing of other people. Frequently this happens when he's talking about Aunt Dahlia, who is SirSwearsALot.
--> "Her first observation was that L.P. Runkle was an illegitimate offspring to end all illegitimate offsprings." (''Much Obliged, Jeeves'')



* SeparatedByACommonLanguage: In "The Aunt and the Sluggard", Miss Rockmetter, Rocky's scary aunt, comes to visit. After Bertie says tea "bucks you up" and "makes you fizz", the aunt says "I don't understand a word you say. You're English, aren't you?"

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* SeparatedByACommonLanguage: In "The Aunt and the Sluggard", Miss Rockmetter, Rocky's scary American aunt, comes to visit. After Bertie says tea "bucks you up" and "makes you fizz", the aunt says "I don't understand a word you say. You're English, aren't you?"



* UnusuallyUninterestingSight: In an early chapter of ''Jeeves In The Morning,'' a house burns down. This is barely mentioned throughout the rest of the novel, not even by the owner.
--> '''Lord Worplesdon''' ''(to Bertie):'' "I should have known that the first thing you would do, before so much as unpacking, would be to burn the place to the ground!"
2nd May '18 7:00:15 AM jamespolk
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* ''Joy in the Morning'' (1946)

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* ''Joy in the Morning'' ''Literature/JoyInTheMorning'' (1946)
26th Apr '18 4:28:53 PM jamespolk
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* BreachOfPromiseOfMarriage: One of Jeeves' regular tasks is getting Bertie Wooster out of engagements while avoiding such lawsuits. The TV adaptation, produced after the breach of promise doctrine was abolished, replaces these references with Jeeves simply trying to avoid offence to the parties involved or being under threat of violence rather than legal action.

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* BreachOfPromiseOfMarriage: One of Jeeves' regular tasks is getting Bertie Wooster out of engagements while avoiding such lawsuits. The TV adaptation, produced after the breach of promise doctrine was abolished, replaces these references with very last Jeeves simply trying and Wooster short story, "Jeeves and the Greasy Bird", has a con artist scam Bertie into making a faux marriage proposal only to demand a £2000 payoff to avoid offence to just such a suit. Jeeves, naturally, gets Bertie off the parties involved or being under threat of violence rather than legal action.hook.



* ChristmasEpisode: "Jeeves and the Yule-Tide Spirit", in which Bertie is invited to spend the holiday at the Wickham residence. He decides to play a trick on fellow guest Tuppy Glossop, but as usual with his schemes, it goes horribly wrong.

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* ChristmasEpisode: ChristmasEpisode:
**
"Jeeves and the Yule-Tide Spirit", in which Bertie is invited to spend the holiday at the Wickham residence. He decides to play a trick on fellow guest Tuppy Glossop, but as usual with his schemes, it goes horribly wrong.wrong.
** "Jeeves and the Greasy Bird" has Aunt Dahlia demanding that Bertie play Santa at a children's Christmas party, much to Bertie's horror.
21st Apr '18 3:20:14 PM jamespolk
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* MyNaymeIs: In "The Spot of Art", Aunt Dahlia is appalled when Bertie tells her he is dating a girl named "Gwladys" with a silent "w".



* OddballInTheSeries: Short story "Bertie Changes His Mind" is the only piece of writing in the Jeeves and Wooster canon narrated by Jeeves.

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* OddballInTheSeries: Short story "Bertie Changes His Mind" is the only piece of writing in the Jeeves and Wooster canon narrated by Jeeves. The other work not narrated by Bertie is ''Literature/RingForJeeves'', in which Bertie doesn't appear at all and the story is told in third person.
21st Apr '18 2:04:36 PM Geoduck
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Added DiffLines:

* AluminumChristmasTrees: Many of the goofy musical-hall songs of which Bertie is an aficionado are real-life examples of the genre.
21st Apr '18 11:38:44 AM jamespolk
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Added DiffLines:

** In "Episode of the Dog [=McIntosh=]" Jeeves reacts to the news that Bobbie Wickham has given Aunt Agatha's dog away with a mild "Most disturbing, sir." Bertie freaks out a little bit: "Oh? And I suppose, if you had been in San Francisco when the earthquake started, you would just have lifted up your your finger and said 'Tweet, tweet! Shush, shush! Now, now! Come, come!'"
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