History Fridge / RedVsBlue

18th May '17 3:00:56 PM streakson22
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* Why did the Alien beat up Tucker as soon as he noticed that Tucker had the sword? He most likely came for the sword in the first place, but because Tucker had it, it wouldn't work for anyone else. Much later in the series, we learn that a sword is bonded to its owner until their death. He was trying to kill Tucker and take the sword!
* Fridge Humor: Sister was sent to Blood Gulch to replace Captain Flowers, which led the Red Team to assume that she's supposed to be a Blue. But as we learn in Season 14, Donut was sent there for the same reason. Sister may have actually been a Red all along, making her switch to Blue Team pointless.
17th May '17 11:03:35 AM OmegalphaAI
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* The reason why the FOTUS Soldier had an alien weapon? [[spoiler:He's from Chorus. He probably fought in the battle from the end of Season 13, where everyone was armed with alien technology.]]
16th May '17 6:56:43 PM Rotide
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* CT's plot seemed to be LeftHanging for years- who he was working for, and what their motivation was. In retrospect, it can be fairly easily inferred that he was still working for Charon Industries, and that the whole operation was an attack on Project Freelancer in the final stages of the project's implosion.
14th May '17 11:17:32 AM Rotide
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* Two from episode 7- one, that it aired on Mother's Day, given that [[spoiler: Chorus has a lot more mothers now]]. The other is that, since the Temple of Procreation was intended to repopulate planets, and Chorus has lost a substantial portion of its population due to the CivilWar, it's actually being used for its intended purpose. (Also falls under FridgeHorror)
11th May '17 8:02:28 PM Rotide
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Doyle's feelings of worthlessness fits even more when you realize that all his decisions we see have been mistakes. He let Locus fool play him for fool, even when he disobeyed orders and led men to their deaths. He also showed while he has some grasp of military strategy, [[GoodCannotComprehendEvil he has difficulty grasping the mindset of]] [[TheSociopath Felix]]. If he failed to grasp that a heartless monster wouldn't willingly send his men to his deaths, then what good would he think he could do?

to:

* Doyle's feelings of worthlessness fits even more when you realize that all his decisions we see have been mistakes. He let Locus fool play him for fool, even when he disobeyed orders and led men to their deaths. He also showed while he has some grasp of military strategy, [[GoodCannotComprehendEvil he has difficulty grasping the mindset of]] [[TheSociopath Felix]]. If he failed to grasp that a heartless monster wouldn't willingly would happily send his men to his deaths, then what good would he think he could do?
11th May '17 7:54:59 PM streakson22
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* There's another reason why the Director and Counselor chose Agent Florida to watch over the Alpha besides the fact that he's trustworthy: They needed to make him an {{Unperson}}, not just to everyone outside the program, but to the other Freelancers as well. And there couldn't be a better choice than the guy who ''never said anything to any of them.'' Because of his complete silence whenever he's around other Freelancers, they don't know anything about him. They might not even know his name. Because the Freelancers have made no emotional connection with him, it's all too easy for him to go unnoticed. Why do you think Tex genuinely believed there were only 49 Freelancers, despite the Ultimate Fan Guide confirming there were 50? She wasn't even aware of Agent Florida's existence.

to:

* There's another reason why the Director and Counselor chose Agent Florida to watch over the Alpha besides the fact that he's trustworthy: They needed to make him an {{Unperson}}, not just to everyone outside the program, but to the other Freelancers as well. And there couldn't be a better choice than the guy who ''never said anything to any of them.'' Because of his complete silence whenever he's around other Freelancers, they don't know anything about him. They might not even know his name. Because the Freelancers have made no emotional connection with him, it's all too easy for him to go unnoticed. Why do you think Tex genuinely believed there were only 49 Freelancers, despite the Ultimate Fan Guide confirming there were 50? She wasn't even aware of Agent Florida's existence. None of them were. The only one who might've known him was Carolina, as the leader of the top group, and everyone thought she was dead anyway.
11th May '17 9:30:23 AM streakson22
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** This is actually a great allegory for how videogames don't give a good representation of war. Project Freelancer has a lot of positive things going for it that are similar to a videogame (powerups/tools that give the Freelancers incredible advantages compared to their enemies, drop pods that can resupply the troops in the event they need it (like when Tex calls in for support from the Mother of Invention, and they send in a motorcycle, like how first person shooters give killstreaks to the best players, Tex did the most, so she is rewarded with additional support)). But the thing is, it also highlights how a videogame-like system wouldn't work in the real world. The scoreboard, awarded rather arbitrarily, only serves to tear the entire team apart, as there is no real reason for the Freelancers to work together, and it encourages them to go rogue and complete missions on their own to hoard points instead of working towards a common goal. The codenames, while cool, desensitize the Freelancers to each other, making them barely recognize their comrades as fellow human beings (which leads to things like CT's assassination and Carolina pushing Maine off of a several hundred story building). The Freelancers not questioning where their powerups came from, and why they have them when everyone else they encounter doesn't, could be part of the reason why they don't realize sooner that a sentient being was being tortured to provide them with equipment. Oh, and in the story, the Freelancers respond to anything with the most destructive solution (like when York was trying to open a door, but because he wasn't fast enough, the Mother of Invention blew his area up, when the Freelancers wanted to get rid of the evidence of them stealing data they blew up an oil rig, or when the MOI wanted to deal with a building swarming with people and rare/valuable artifacts, it orbitally bombarded it). Individually, they're exceptional warriors, but they're not soldiers. Just like how players would make terrible soldiers without a mindset change.

to:

** This is actually a great allegory for how videogames don't give a good representation of war. Project Freelancer has a lot of positive things going for it that are similar to a videogame (powerups/tools that give the Freelancers incredible advantages compared to their enemies, drop pods that can resupply the troops in the event they need it (like when Tex calls in for support from the Mother of Invention, and they send in a motorcycle, like how first person shooters give killstreaks to the best players, Tex did the most, so she is rewarded with additional support)).upport)). But the thing is, it also highlights how a videogame-like system wouldn't work in the real world. The scoreboard, awarded rather arbitrarily, only serves to tear the entire team apart, as there is no real reason for the Freelancers to work together, and it encourages them to go rogue and complete missions on their own to hoard points instead of working towards a common goal. The codenames, while cool, desensitize the Freelancers to each other, making them barely recognize their comrades as fellow human beings (which leads to things like CT's assassination and Carolina pushing Maine off of a several hundred story building). The Freelancers not questioning where their powerups came from, and why they have them when everyone else they encounter doesn't, could be part of the reason why they don't realize sooner that a sentient being was being tortured to provide them with equipment. Oh, and in the story, the Freelancers respond to anything with the most destructive solution (like when York was trying to open a door, but because he wasn't fast enough, the Mother of Invention blew his area up, when the Freelancers wanted to get rid of the evidence of them stealing data they blew up an oil rig, or when the MOI wanted to deal with a building swarming with people and rare/valuable artifacts, it orbitally bombarded it). Individually, they're exceptional warriors, but they're not soldiers. Just like how players would make terrible soldiers without a mindset change.


Added DiffLines:

* There's another reason why the Director and Counselor chose Agent Florida to watch over the Alpha besides the fact that he's trustworthy: They needed to make him an {{Unperson}}, not just to everyone outside the program, but to the other Freelancers as well. And there couldn't be a better choice than the guy who ''never said anything to any of them.'' Because of his complete silence whenever he's around other Freelancers, they don't know anything about him. They might not even know his name. Because the Freelancers have made no emotional connection with him, it's all too easy for him to go unnoticed. Why do you think Tex genuinely believed there were only 49 Freelancers, despite the Ultimate Fan Guide confirming there were 50? She wasn't even aware of Agent Florida's existence.
4th May '17 5:35:42 PM New_Jack_Swing
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Doyle's feelings of worthlessness fits even more when you realize that all his decisions we see have been mistakes. He let Locus fool play him for fool, even when he disobeyed orders and led men to their deaths. He also showed while he has some grasp of military strategy, [[GoodCannotComprehendEvil he has difficulty grasping the mindset of]] [[TheSociopath Felix]]. If failed to grasp that a heartless monster wouldn't willingly send his men to his deaths, then what good would he think he could do.

to:

* Doyle's feelings of worthlessness fits even more when you realize that all his decisions we see have been mistakes. He let Locus fool play him for fool, even when he disobeyed orders and led men to their deaths. He also showed while he has some grasp of military strategy, [[GoodCannotComprehendEvil he has difficulty grasping the mindset of]] [[TheSociopath Felix]]. If he failed to grasp that a heartless monster wouldn't willingly send his men to his deaths, then what good would he think he could do.do?



** Several songs from The Chorus Trilogy play throughout the ending of the previous episode and this one, but Contact is strangely missing. Of course it is; Chorus has been rediscovered, so a song about being stranded and desperately calling for help doesn't apply anymore.
** One of the reasons why Dylan is tracking down the Reds and Blues is because she doesn't think their story is over and she wants to see how it ends. As she's explaining this, Half-Life starts to play. Considering the song's main lyric is "And I wonder where you are", this was most likely intentional.
** The parody of The Force Awakens is funny on its own, but there's an added layer of hilarity when you remember that the characters themselves have compared the plot of The Chorus Trilogy to Star Wars. How fitting that this scene happens to be at the end of a Chorus-centric episode that shows what all the characters of that arc have been doing since we last saw them.

to:

** Several songs from The ''The Chorus Trilogy Trilogy'' play throughout the ending of the previous episode and this one, but Contact "Contact" is strangely missing. Of course it is; Chorus has been rediscovered, so a song about being stranded and desperately calling for help doesn't apply anymore.
** One of the reasons why Dylan is tracking down the Reds and Blues is because she doesn't think their story is over and she wants to see how it ends. As she's explaining this, Half-Life "Half-Life" starts to play. Considering the song's main lyric is "And I wonder where you are", this was most likely intentional.
** The parody of The Force Awakens ''Film/TheForceAwakens'' is funny on its own, but there's an added layer of hilarity when you remember that the characters themselves have compared the plot of The ''The Chorus Trilogy Trilogy'' to Star Wars. ''Franchise/StarWars''. How fitting that this scene happens to be at the end of a Chorus-centric episode that shows what all the characters of that arc have been doing since we last saw them.them.
* Cleverly-planned heists, penchant for excessive force...are we talking about the [[spoiler: Fake]] Blood Gulch Crew or the [[spoiler: Fake]] [[LetsPlay/AchievementHunterGrandTheftAutoSeries AH Crew]]?
29th Apr '17 8:33:35 PM streakson22
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* We see in the Season 14 finale that a combination of characters from the show using a teleportation device, someone pulling the machinima death switch, and Rocket Rooster energy drink being dumped on the Xbox can bring the characters to the "real world." What if these circumstances were to happen again, except instead of the Reds and Blues, it was someone like the Meta or Felix that came out? Everyone in the studio would be killed.
26th Apr '17 9:35:39 PM streakson22
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* Multiple examples from the fourth episode of Season 15:
** Several songs from The Chorus Trilogy play throughout the ending of the previous episode and this one, but Contact is strangely missing. Of course it is; Chorus has been rediscovered, so a song about being stranded and desperately calling for help doesn't apply anymore.
** One of the reasons why Dylan is tracking down the Reds and Blues is because she doesn't think their story is over and she wants to see how it ends. As she's explaining this, Half-Life starts to play. Considering the song's main lyric is "And I wonder where you are", this was most likely intentional.
** The parody of The Force Awakens is funny on its own, but there's an added layer of hilarity when you remember that the characters themselves have compared the plot of The Chorus Trilogy to Star Wars. How fitting that this scene happens to be at the end of a Chorus-centric episode that shows what all the characters of that arc have been doing since we last saw them.
This list shows the last 10 events of 472. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Fridge.RedVsBlue