History Film / TheMagnificentAmbersons

5th Sep '15 7:02:35 PM nombretomado
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The film became famous for its behind the scenes controversies, which resulted in the film becoming drastically cut and taken away from Welles. (For more information, see the Trivia page). That said, even in the released version, ''The Magnificent Ambersons'' is often regarded as among the best U.S. films ever made, a distinction it shares with Welles's first film, ''Film/CitizenKane''. The film was nominated for four UsefulNotes/{{Academy Award}}s including Best Picture, and it was added to the NationalFilmRegistry of the Library of Congress in 1991.

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The film became famous for its behind the scenes controversies, which resulted in the film becoming drastically cut and taken away from Welles. (For more information, see the Trivia page). That said, even in the released version, ''The Magnificent Ambersons'' is often regarded as among the best U.S. films ever made, a distinction it shares with Welles's first film, ''Film/CitizenKane''. The film was nominated for four UsefulNotes/{{Academy Award}}s including Best Picture, and it was added to the NationalFilmRegistry UsefulNotes/NationalFilmRegistry of the Library of Congress in 1991.
18th May '15 5:39:51 PM nombretomado
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The film became famous for its behind the scenes controversies, which resulted in the film becoming drastically cut and taken away from Welles. (For more information, see the Trivia page). That said, even in the released version, ''The Magnificent Ambersons'' is often regarded as among the best U.S. films ever made, a distinction it shares with Welles's first film, ''Film/CitizenKane''. The film was nominated for four AcademyAwards including Best Picture, and it was added to the NationalFilmRegistry of the Library of Congress in 1991.

to:

The film became famous for its behind the scenes controversies, which resulted in the film becoming drastically cut and taken away from Welles. (For more information, see the Trivia page). That said, even in the released version, ''The Magnificent Ambersons'' is often regarded as among the best U.S. films ever made, a distinction it shares with Welles's first film, ''Film/CitizenKane''. The film was nominated for four AcademyAwards UsefulNotes/{{Academy Award}}s including Best Picture, and it was added to the NationalFilmRegistry of the Library of Congress in 1991.
30th Apr '15 2:12:50 AM JulianLapostat
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* BreakTheHaughty: George, oh so very much.

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* BreakTheHaughty: George, oh so very much.
30th Apr '15 2:10:02 AM JulianLapostat
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--> '''Eugene''': I'm not sure George is wrong about automobiles. With all their speed forward they may be a step backward in civilization. May be that they won't add to the beauty of the world or the life of the men's souls, I'm not sure. But automobiles have come and almost all outwards things will be different because of what they bring. They're going to alter war and they're going to alter peace. And I think men's minds are going to be changed in subtle ways because of automobiles. And it may be that George is right. May be that in ten to twenty years from now that if we can see the inward change in men by that time, I shouldn't be able to defend the gasoline engine but agree with George - that automobiles had no business to be invented.

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--> '''Eugene''': [[JerkassHasAPoint I'm not sure George is wrong about automobiles.automobiles]]. With all their speed forward they may be a step backward in civilization. [[WasItReallyWorthIt May be that they won't add to the beauty of the world or the life of the men's souls, I'm not sure. sure]]. But automobiles have come [[NothingIsTheSameAnymore and almost all outwards things will be different because of what they bring. They're going to alter war and they're going to alter peace.peace]]. And I think men's minds are going to be changed in subtle ways because of automobiles. And it may be that George is right. May be that in ten to twenty years from now that if we can see the inward change in men by that time, I shouldn't be able to defend the gasoline engine but agree with George - that automobiles had no business to be invented.
30th Apr '15 2:07:58 AM JulianLapostat
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Added DiffLines:

* RomanticismVersusEnlightenment: It's really hard to gauge where the film fits. The Ambersons typify an old world of spoilt decadence and snobbishness, while Eugene Morgan represents the modern industrious spirit. George Amberson Minafer is a {{Jerkass}} while Morgan is a nice guy. More importantly, Eugene Morgan is himself pretty skeptical if the automobiles he's building is going to bring progress:
--> '''George''': I said automobiles are a useless nuisance. Never amount to anything but a nuisance and they had no business to be invented.
--> '''Jack''': Of course you forget that Mr. Morgan makes them, also did his share in inventing them. If you weren't so thoughtless, he might think you were rather offensive.
--> '''Eugene''': I'm not sure George is wrong about automobiles. With all their speed forward they may be a step backward in civilization. May be that they won't add to the beauty of the world or the life of the men's souls, I'm not sure. But automobiles have come and almost all outwards things will be different because of what they bring. They're going to alter war and they're going to alter peace. And I think men's minds are going to be changed in subtle ways because of automobiles. And it may be that George is right. May be that in ten to twenty years from now that if we can see the inward change in men by that time, I shouldn't be able to defend the gasoline engine but agree with George - that automobiles had no business to be invented.
29th Apr '15 12:56:35 PM JulianLapostat
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[[ScrewedByTheNetwork Welles lost control of the editing of the film to RKO]] (thanks to the trouble the studio went through with his [[Film/CitizenKane other film]]), and the final version released to audiences differed significantly from his rough cut of the film. More than an hour of footage was cut by the studio, which also shot and substituted a happier ending. Although Welles's extensive notes for how he wished the film to be cut have survived, the excised footage was destroyed. Composer Creator/BernardHerrmann insisted his credit be removed when, like the film itself, his score was heavily edited by the studio. Creator/RobertWise, who did the editing and shot the revised ending (which actually was taken from the novel), spent years defending his cut as better than Welles' version.

In either case, the film had two previews with Welles' edited version. At the first preview, editor Robert Wise stated that the test audiences were literally laughing at how bad it was. Though researchers note that while ninety percent of the score cards called it terrible, the other ten percent declared it a masterpiece. The second preview at Pasadena was vastly more favorable and audiences reacted to it with enthusiasm even if they felt it was bleak but the studio felt it was too much of a gamble and refused to listen to producer David O. Selznick who saw the original cut, loved it and insisted it be sent to the Museum of Modern Art. They cut out 40 minutes, shot a new ending and [[KickTheDog ordered that the original footage be burnt.]]

Even in the released version, ''The Magnificent Ambersons'' is often regarded as among the best U.S. films ever made, a distinction it shares with Welles's first film, ''Film/CitizenKane''. The film was nominated for four AcademyAwards including Best Picture, and it was added to the NationalFilmRegistry of the Library of Congress in 1991.

to:

[[ScrewedByTheNetwork Welles lost control of The film became famous for its behind the editing of scenes controversies, which resulted in the film to RKO]] (thanks to the trouble the studio went through with his [[Film/CitizenKane other film]]), becoming drastically cut and the final version released to audiences differed significantly from his rough cut of the film. More than an hour of footage was cut by the studio, which also shot and substituted a happier ending. Although Welles's extensive notes for how he wished the film to be cut have survived, the excised footage was destroyed. Composer Creator/BernardHerrmann insisted his credit be removed when, like the film itself, his score was heavily edited by the studio. Creator/RobertWise, who did the editing and shot the revised ending (which actually was taken away from the novel), spent years defending his cut as better than Welles' version.

In either case, the film had two previews with Welles' edited version. At the first preview, editor Robert Wise stated that the test audiences were literally laughing at how bad it was. Though researchers note that while ninety percent of the score cards called it terrible, the other ten percent declared it a masterpiece. The second preview at Pasadena was vastly
Welles. (For more favorable and audiences reacted to it with enthusiasm information, see the Trivia page). That said, even if they felt it was bleak but the studio felt it was too much of a gamble and refused to listen to producer David O. Selznick who saw the original cut, loved it and insisted it be sent to the Museum of Modern Art. They cut out 40 minutes, shot a new ending and [[KickTheDog ordered that the original footage be burnt.]]

Even
in the released version, ''The Magnificent Ambersons'' is often regarded as among the best U.S. films ever made, a distinction it shares with Welles's first film, ''Film/CitizenKane''. The film was nominated for four AcademyAwards including Best Picture, and it was added to the NationalFilmRegistry of the Library of Congress in 1991.
3rd Feb '15 5:32:12 AM AnotherGuy
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[[ScrewedByTheNetwork Welles lost control of the editing of the film to RKO]], and the final version released to audiences differed significantly from his rough cut of the film. More than an hour of footage was cut by the studio, which also shot and substituted a happier ending. Although Welles's extensive notes for how he wished the film to be cut have survived, the excised footage was destroyed. Composer Creator/BernardHerrmann insisted his credit be removed when, like the film itself, his score was heavily edited by the studio. Creator/RobertWise, who did the editing and shot the revised ending (which actually was taken from the novel), spent years defending his cut as better than Welles' version.

to:

[[ScrewedByTheNetwork Welles lost control of the editing of the film to RKO]], RKO]] (thanks to the trouble the studio went through with his [[Film/CitizenKane other film]]), and the final version released to audiences differed significantly from his rough cut of the film. More than an hour of footage was cut by the studio, which also shot and substituted a happier ending. Although Welles's extensive notes for how he wished the film to be cut have survived, the excised footage was destroyed. Composer Creator/BernardHerrmann insisted his credit be removed when, like the film itself, his score was heavily edited by the studio. Creator/RobertWise, who did the editing and shot the revised ending (which actually was taken from the novel), spent years defending his cut as better than Welles' version.
3rd Feb '15 5:29:56 AM AnotherGuy
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Added DiffLines:

* NostalgiaFilter: One of the themes of the film.
-->'''[[OrsonWelles Narrator]]:''' The magnificence of the Ambersons began in 1873. Their splendor lasted throughout all the years that saw their Midland town spread and darken into a city. In that town in those days, all the women who wore silk or velvet knew all the other women who wore silk or velvet and everybody knew everybody else's family horse and carriage. The only public conveyance was the streetcar. A lady could whistle to it from an upstairs window, and the car would halt at once, and wait for her, while she shut the window ... put on her hat and coat ... went downstairs... found an umbrella... told the 'girl' what to have for dinner...and came forth from the house. Too slow for us nowadays, because the faster we're carried, the less time we have to spare.
4th Aug '14 11:32:06 PM JulianLapostat
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Added DiffLines:

In either case, the film had two previews with Welles' edited version. At the first preview, editor Robert Wise stated that the test audiences were literally laughing at how bad it was. Though researchers note that while ninety percent of the score cards called it terrible, the other ten percent declared it a masterpiece. The second preview at Pasadena was vastly more favorable and audiences reacted to it with enthusiasm even if they felt it was bleak but the studio felt it was too much of a gamble and refused to listen to producer David O. Selznick who saw the original cut, loved it and insisted it be sent to the Museum of Modern Art. They cut out 40 minutes, shot a new ending and [[KickTheDog ordered that the original footage be burnt.]]
17th Apr '14 7:57:43 AM gallium
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[[ScrewedByTheNetwork Welles lost control of the editing of the film to RKO]], and the final version released to audiences differed significantly from his rough cut of the film. More than an hour of footage was cut by the studio, which also shot and substituted a happier ending. Although Welles's extensive notes for how he wished the film to be cut have survived, the excised footage was destroyed. Composer Creator/BernardHerrmann insisted his credit be removed when, like the film itself, his score was heavily edited by the studio.

to:

[[ScrewedByTheNetwork Welles lost control of the editing of the film to RKO]], and the final version released to audiences differed significantly from his rough cut of the film. More than an hour of footage was cut by the studio, which also shot and substituted a happier ending. Although Welles's extensive notes for how he wished the film to be cut have survived, the excised footage was destroyed. Composer Creator/BernardHerrmann insisted his credit be removed when, like the film itself, his score was heavily edited by the studio.
studio. Creator/RobertWise, who did the editing and shot the revised ending (which actually was taken from the novel), spent years defending his cut as better than Welles' version.
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