History Film / TheMagnificentAmbersons

27th Apr '17 11:06:38 AM Golondrina
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''The Magnificent Ambersons'' is a [[TheForties 1942]] U.S. PeriodDrama, the second feature film produced and directed by OrsonWelles. Welles adapted Booth Tarkington’s Pulitzer Prize-winning 1918 novel, about the declining fortunes of a proud Midwestern family and the social changes brought by the automobile age. The film stars Creator/JosephCotten, Dolores Costello (Creator/DrewBarrymore's grandma!), Anne Baxter, Tim Holt, Agnes Moorehead, and Ray Collins, with [[TheNarrator Welles providing the narration]].

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''The Magnificent Ambersons'' is a [[TheForties 1942]] U.S. PeriodDrama, the second feature film produced and directed by OrsonWelles.Creator/OrsonWelles. Welles adapted Booth Tarkington’s Pulitzer Prize-winning 1918 novel, about the declining fortunes of a proud Midwestern family and the social changes brought by the automobile age. The film stars Creator/JosephCotten, Dolores Costello (Creator/DrewBarrymore's grandma!), Anne Baxter, Tim Holt, Agnes Moorehead, and Ray Collins, with [[TheNarrator Welles providing the narration]].



-->'''[[OrsonWelles Narrator]]:''' The magnificence of the Ambersons began in 1873. Their splendor lasted throughout all the years that saw their Midland town spread and darken into a city. In that town in those days, all the women who wore silk or velvet knew all the other women who wore silk or velvet and everybody knew everybody else's family horse and carriage. The only public conveyance was the streetcar. A lady could whistle to it from an upstairs window, and the car would halt at once, and wait for her, while she shut the window ... put on her hat and coat ... went downstairs... found an umbrella... told the 'girl' what to have for dinner...and came forth from the house. Too slow for us nowadays, because the faster we're carried, the less time we have to spare.

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-->'''[[OrsonWelles -->'''[[Creator/OrsonWelles Narrator]]:''' The magnificence of the Ambersons began in 1873. Their splendor lasted throughout all the years that saw their Midland town spread and darken into a city. In that town in those days, all the women who wore silk or velvet knew all the other women who wore silk or velvet and everybody knew everybody else's family horse and carriage. The only public conveyance was the streetcar. A lady could whistle to it from an upstairs window, and the car would halt at once, and wait for her, while she shut the window ... put on her hat and coat ... went downstairs... found an umbrella... told the 'girl' what to have for dinner...and came forth from the house. Too slow for us nowadays, because the faster we're carried, the less time we have to spare.
14th Apr '17 6:03:50 PM CumbersomeTercel
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''The Magnificent Ambersons'' is a [[TheForties 1942]] U.S. PeriodDrama, the second feature film produced and directed by OrsonWelles. Welles adapted Booth Tarkington’s Pulitzer Prize-winning 1918 novel, about the declining fortunes of a proud Midwestern family and the social changes brought by the automobile age. The film stars Joseph Cotten, Dolores Costello (Creator/DrewBarrymore's grandma!), Anne Baxter, Tim Holt, Agnes Moorehead, and Ray Collins, with [[TheNarrator Welles providing the narration]].

to:

''The Magnificent Ambersons'' is a [[TheForties 1942]] U.S. PeriodDrama, the second feature film produced and directed by OrsonWelles. Welles adapted Booth Tarkington’s Pulitzer Prize-winning 1918 novel, about the declining fortunes of a proud Midwestern family and the social changes brought by the automobile age. The film stars Joseph Cotten, Creator/JosephCotten, Dolores Costello (Creator/DrewBarrymore's grandma!), Anne Baxter, Tim Holt, Agnes Moorehead, and Ray Collins, with [[TheNarrator Welles providing the narration]].
24th Jan '17 10:37:55 AM Gosicrystal
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* LostForever: A good chunk of this movie was edited and thrown away by producers while Welles was abroad.
4th Jan '17 5:18:21 AM Ezclee4050
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* CelebrityParadox: Besides the in-universe one with Eugene Morgan and Jed Leland mentioned below in Mythology Gag, there's also the shot where George (played by Tim Holt) walks past a movie poster for a film starring Jack Holt (a silent film star who happened to be Tim Holt's father).


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* OldMaid: Fanny, mixed with UnrequitedTragicMaiden due to her crush on Eugene.
19th Jun '16 12:37:28 AM JulianLapostat
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Creator/RobertWise, later a great director himself, did the editing as well as directing the reshoots mandated by RKO.

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Creator/RobertWise, later a great director himself, Creator/RobertWise did the editing as well as directing the reshoots mandated by RKO.
19th Jun '16 12:35:44 AM JulianLapostat
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!!This film provides examples of:

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!!This ! This film provides examples of:of:
* AdaptedOut: Both Welles and the revised ending of the studios change the ending of the books: i.e. the events leading up to Eugene's visit to George at the hospital. A visit to a medium where Eugene actually interacts with the spirit of Isabelle. Welles and even the studio saw it as a clumsy DeusExMachina that went against the spirit of the story, and saw fit to change it, albeit to different ends.
* AdaptationalVillainy: George Minafer was still a {{Jerkass}} in the books but he had more moments of JerkassHasAPoint and he even had a few sympathetic moments. Minafer's criticism of people around him was also a lot more pointed and correct in the books, whereas Welles made George really insufferable and unsympathetic.



** The somewhat happier note with the scene in the hospital hallway was the principal addition that lightened Welles' DownerEnding, which was more bleak, with Fanny alone in a boardinghouse and a final meeting with Eugene reminding her of what she'd lost. (Although this was changed from the book, so it was probably for the best.)

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** The somewhat happier note with the scene in the hospital hallway was the principal addition that lightened Welles' DownerEnding, which was more bleak, with Fanny alone in a boardinghouse and a final meeting with Eugene reminding her of what she'd lost. (Although this was changed from Storyboards and the book, so it was probably for film's cutting continuity show the best.)scene.
18th Jun '16 11:57:27 PM Give1Take2
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* BittersweetEnding: Isabelle is dead, and she and Eugene never married. George has been brought low enough to work for meager wages, and then he's injured in an automobile accident. The Ambersons are broke. But there's an implication that Lucy and George might get together after all, and Eugene takes some comfort in believing that Isabelle's spirit is with them and knows about his reconciliation with George.
** The somewhat happier note with the scene in the hospital hallway was the principal addition that lightened Welles' DownerEnding, which was more bleak, with Fanny alone in a boardinghouse and a final meeting with Eugene reminding her of what she'd lost.

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* BittersweetEnding: Isabelle is dead, and she and Eugene never married. George has been brought low enough to work for meager wages, and then he's injured in an automobile accident. The Ambersons are broke. But there's an implication that Lucy and George might get together after all, and Eugene takes some comfort in believing that Isabelle's spirit is with them and knows about his reconciliation with George.
George.[[note]]This ending is lifted straight from the book.[[/note]]
** The somewhat happier note with the scene in the hospital hallway was the principal addition that lightened Welles' DownerEnding, which was more bleak, with Fanny alone in a boardinghouse and a final meeting with Eugene reminding her of what she'd lost. (Although this was changed from the book, so it was probably for the best.)
24th May '16 7:44:50 PM freesefan
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''The Magnificent Ambersons'' is a [[TheForties 1942]] U.S. PeriodDrama, the second feature film produced and directed by OrsonWelles. Welles adapted Booth Tarkington’s Pulitzer Prize-winning 1918 novel, about the declining fortunes of a proud Midwestern family and the social changes brought by the automobile age. The film stars [[Film/CitizenKane Joseph]] [[Film/TheThirdMan Cotton]], Dolores Costello (Creator/DrewBarrymore's grandma!), [[Film/AllAboutEve Anne Baxter]], Tim Holt, [[Film/CitizenKane Agnes Moorehead]], and Ray Collins, with [[TheNarrator Welles providing the narration]].

to:

''The Magnificent Ambersons'' is a [[TheForties 1942]] U.S. PeriodDrama, the second feature film produced and directed by OrsonWelles. Welles adapted Booth Tarkington’s Pulitzer Prize-winning 1918 novel, about the declining fortunes of a proud Midwestern family and the social changes brought by the automobile age. The film stars [[Film/CitizenKane Joseph]] [[Film/TheThirdMan Cotton]], Joseph Cotten, Dolores Costello (Creator/DrewBarrymore's grandma!), [[Film/AllAboutEve Anne Baxter]], Baxter, Tim Holt, [[Film/CitizenKane Agnes Moorehead]], Moorehead, and Ray Collins, with [[TheNarrator Welles providing the narration]].
24th May '16 7:43:39 PM freesefan
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Added DiffLines:

Creator/RobertWise, later a great director himself, did the editing as well as directing the reshoots mandated by RKO.
24th May '16 7:42:44 PM freesefan
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Added DiffLines:

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