History Film / TheCore

11th Sep '17 12:59:25 AM GoldenKeyblade
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*** The Second Law of Thermodynamics, in particular, takes a mighty shellackin' in this movie. Even if unobtainium were a perfect insulator, so that no external heat could get in ''at all'', the interior of the ''Virgil'' would still generate an enormous amount of its own waste heat from human bodies, life support systems, electronics, the motors running the impellers, and so on. Just look at how hot the nuclear reactor's core was. The only "heat sink" they brought along was some liquid nitrogen. Even if half the entire payload mass was liquid nitrogen, it would certainly have absorbed all the heat it could within the first ''hour''. [[note: Although here we have a case of two scientific wrongs making a right: because of gravity, any journey through the planet, regardless of the start and end points, should supposedly only take about 45 minutes with an appropriate vehicle (which they had); so enough liquid nitrogen to cool the ''Virgil'' for an hour would actually have been sufficient and even allow a decent amount of leeway.]]

to:

*** The Second Law of Thermodynamics, in particular, takes a mighty shellackin' in this movie. Even if unobtainium were a perfect insulator, so that no external heat could get in ''at all'', the interior of the ''Virgil'' would still generate an enormous amount of its own waste heat from human bodies, life support systems, electronics, the motors running the impellers, and so on. Just look at how hot the nuclear reactor's core was. The only "heat sink" they brought along was some liquid nitrogen. Even if half the entire payload mass was liquid nitrogen, it would certainly have absorbed all the heat it could within the first ''hour''. [[note: [[note]] Although here we have a case of two scientific wrongs making a right: because of gravity, any journey through the planet, regardless of the start and end points, should supposedly only take about 45 minutes with an appropriate vehicle (which they had); so enough liquid nitrogen to cool the ''Virgil'' for an hour would actually have been sufficient and even allow a decent amount of leeway.]] [[/note]]
11th Sep '17 12:58:02 AM GoldenKeyblade
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*** Our hero has to boost the warhead yield of the last bomb by 30%. How does he do this? By taking 6 pounds of plutonium from the ''Virgil'''s nuclear reactor and ''placing it next to the bomb''. It's doubtful the writers were aware that multimegaton nuclear devices use the nuclear ''fusion'' of heavy-hydrogen isotopes as their primary energy source, and only use the nuclear fission of plutonium-239 (which has to be weapons grade, not reactor grade) to set the fusion reaction off. Now, fission-fusion-fission bombs ''do'' employ a uranium-238 tamper around the outside, which absorbs the neutrons generated by the fusion reaction and undergoes spontaneous fission. This doubles or even quadruples the warhead yield. At the 200 megaton level, it's likely that all the bombs ''had'' to be fission-fusion-fission devices. '''However''', the uranium tamper must ''surround'' the fusion core to do this. Having a chunk of uranium (or plutonium) sitting off to one side would only create some atomized uranium (or plutonium) shrapnel.

to:

*** Our hero has to boost the warhead yield of the last bomb by 30%. How does he do this? By taking 6 pounds of plutonium from the ''Virgil'''s ''Virgil''[='s=] nuclear reactor and ''placing it next to the bomb''. It's doubtful the writers were aware that multimegaton nuclear devices use the nuclear ''fusion'' of heavy-hydrogen isotopes as their primary energy source, and only use the nuclear fission of plutonium-239 (which has to be weapons grade, not reactor grade) to set the fusion reaction off. Now, fission-fusion-fission bombs ''do'' employ a uranium-238 tamper around the outside, which absorbs the neutrons generated by the fusion reaction and undergoes spontaneous fission. This doubles or even quadruples the warhead yield. At the 200 megaton level, it's likely that all the bombs ''had'' to be fission-fusion-fission devices. '''However''', the uranium tamper must ''surround'' the fusion core to do this. Having a chunk of uranium (or plutonium) sitting off to one side would only create some atomized uranium (or plutonium) shrapnel.
11th Sep '17 12:57:18 AM GoldenKeyblade
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It may, however, work if the field is fluctuating wildly and causing the pigeons to get confused and panic, but that's probably overthinking things. In its defence, the movie also [[LampshadeHanging lampshades]] it; when the hero asks "How do birds navigate?", one of his grad students replies, "By sight."

to:

*** It may, however, work this way if the field is fluctuating wildly and causing the pigeons to get confused and panic, but that's probably overthinking things. panic; however, that does not appear to be what's happening. In its defence, defense, the movie also [[LampshadeHanging lampshades]] it; when the hero asks "How do birds navigate?", one of his grad students replies, "By sight."



*** The ''Virgil'' encounters an underground equivalent of an asteroid belt composed of gigantic diamonds... which cannot form as deep as it is, since carbon could not possibly crystallize in those kinds of temperatures... the crystals would be constantly breaking down before they could fully form. Plus, carbon is far too light to remain below the mantle for very long... it would be like popping a balloon at ground level and expecting the helium to remain where it was.
*** In RealLife, the Earth's core spins ''because'' the rest of the Earth is spinning. It rotates once every 23 hours 56 minutes 4 seconds, just like the rest of the Earth does. Relative to somebody standing on the Earth's surface, the core doesn't appear to move at all. If the core "stopped spinning", it would appear to ''spin in the opposite direction'' relative to the Earth's surface. (And where would all that angular momentum go? At the very least, the rest of the Earth would have to ''speed up''.)
*** The Earth's outer core weighs in at 1.8 ''sextillion'' metric tons. You'd have to throw one ''hell'' of a monkey wrench into the path of ''that'' spinning freight train to brake it from one-rotation-every-24-hours to a dead stop. And even if you did, all that angular momentum would have to go somewhere; the rest of the Earth should have ''sped up'' by quite a huge margin.\\
Not to mention we haven't developed a single nuclear warhead powerful enough to even break 6.0 on the Moment Magnitude scale. Krakatoa laughs at our most powerful nuke. So how can you expect a nuke to even give so much as a nudge to all that molten iron?
*** Now that we're with the core's weight (and thus, density), at some point they get the surprise that the core is supposedly of a different density than they ''thought'' (emphasis added) it had. The movie handwaves it with a variant of "hey, nobody has ever been down there to ''measure'' the core's density" (again, emphasis added). Never mind that said density ''has'' been accurately ''measured'' by how it affects seismic waves' (from earthquakes of known origin) propagation, a measurement that has been verified by how it's used to accurately calculate back the position of new quakes by their seismic waves' propagation through the core.
*** When the ''Virgil'' descends through the Earth's crust and into the mantle (and, later, when it has to travel upward through the mantle to escape), the mantle shown is clearly supposed to be a liquid, thereby not requiring the use of their drilling laser. In RealLife, the lower and middle mantles are semi-liquid goop that flow like pitch (at best), while the upper mantle is most decidedly solid.

to:

*** The ''Virgil'' encounters an underground equivalent of an asteroid belt composed of gigantic diamonds... which cannot form as deep as it is, since carbon could not possibly crystallize in those kinds of temperatures... Let's start with the crystals would be constantly breaking down before they could fully form. Plus, carbon is far too light to remain below the mantle for very long... it would be like popping a balloon at ground level and expecting the helium to remain where it was.
*** In
fact that in RealLife, the Earth's core spins ''because'' the rest of the Earth is spinning. It rotates once every 23 hours 56 minutes 4 seconds, just like the rest of the Earth does. Relative to somebody standing on the Earth's surface, the core doesn't appear to move at all. If the core "stopped spinning", it would appear to ''spin in the opposite direction'' relative to the Earth's surface. (And where would all that angular momentum go? At the very least, the rest of the Earth would have to ''speed up''.)
*** The Earth's outer core weighs in at 1.8 ''sextillion'' metric tons. You'd have to throw one ''hell'' of a monkey wrench into the path of ''that'' spinning freight train to brake it from one-rotation-every-24-hours to a dead stop. And even if you did, all that angular momentum would have to go somewhere; the rest of the Earth should have ''sped up'' by quite a huge margin.\\
Not to mention we haven't developed a single nuclear warhead powerful enough to even break 6.0 on the Moment Magnitude scale. Krakatoa laughs at our most powerful nuke. So how can you expect a nuke to even give so much as a nudge to all that molten iron?
*** Now that we're with On the subject of the core's weight (and thus, density), at some point they get the surprise that the core is supposedly of a different density than they ''thought'' (emphasis added) it had. The movie handwaves it with a variant of "hey, nobody has ever been down there to ''measure'' the core's density" (again, emphasis added). Never mind that said density ''has'' been accurately ''measured'' by how it affects the propagation seismic waves' waves (from earthquakes of known origin) propagation, origin), a measurement that has been verified by how it's used to accurately calculate back the position of new quakes by their seismic waves' propagation through the core.
*** The ''Virgil'' encounters an underground equivalent of an asteroid belt composed of gigantic diamonds. Diamonds cannot form as deep at the ship's level, since carbon could not possibly crystallize in those kinds of temperatures; the crystals would be constantly breaking down before they could fully form. Plus, carbon is far too light to remain below the mantle for very long; it would be like popping a balloon at ground level and expecting the helium to remain where it was.
*** When the ''Virgil'' descends through the Earth's crust and into the mantle (and, later, when it has to travel upward through the mantle to escape), the mantle shown is clearly supposed to be a liquid, thereby not requiring the use of their drilling laser. In RealLife, the lower and middle mantles are semi-liquid goop that flow like pitch (at best), while and the upper mantle is most decidedly solid.



*** Our hero has to boost the warhead yield of the last bomb by 30%. How does he do this? By taking 6 pounds of plutonium from the ''Virgil'''s nuclear reactor and ''placing it next to the bomb''. It's doubtful the writers were even aware that multimegaton nuclear devices use the nuclear ''fusion'' of heavy-hydrogen isotopes as their primary energy source, and only use the nuclear fission of plutonium-239 (which has to be weapons grade, not reactor grade) to set the fusion reaction off.\\
Fission-fusion-fission bombs ''do'' employ a uranium-238 tamper around the outside, which absorbs the neutrons generated by the fusion reaction and undergoes spontaneous fission. This doubles or even quadruples the warhead yield. At the 200 megaton level, it's likely that all the bombs ''had'' to be fission-fusion-fission devices. However, the uranium tamper must ''surround'' the fusion core to do this. Having a chunk of uranium (or plutonium) sitting off to one side would only create some atomized uranium(or plutonium) shrapnel.

to:

*** Our hero has to boost the warhead yield of the last bomb by 30%. How does he do this? By taking 6 pounds of plutonium from the ''Virgil'''s nuclear reactor and ''placing it next to the bomb''. It's doubtful the writers were even aware that multimegaton nuclear devices use the nuclear ''fusion'' of heavy-hydrogen isotopes as their primary energy source, and only use the nuclear fission of plutonium-239 (which has to be weapons grade, not reactor grade) to set the fusion reaction off.\\
Fission-fusion-fission
off. Now, fission-fusion-fission bombs ''do'' employ a uranium-238 tamper around the outside, which absorbs the neutrons generated by the fusion reaction and undergoes spontaneous fission. This doubles or even quadruples the warhead yield. At the 200 megaton level, it's likely that all the bombs ''had'' to be fission-fusion-fission devices. However, '''However''', the uranium tamper must ''surround'' the fusion core to do this. Having a chunk of uranium (or plutonium) sitting off to one side would only create some atomized uranium(or uranium (or plutonium) shrapnel.



*** The Second Law of Thermodynamics, in particular, takes a mighty shellackin' in this movie. Even if unobtainium were a perfect insulator, so that no external heat could get in ''at all'', the interior of the ''Virgil'' would still generate an enormous amount of its own waste heat from human bodies, life support systems, electronics, the motors running the impellers, etc.. You ''saw'' how hot the nuclear reactor's core was. The only "heat sink" they brought along was some liquid nitrogen. Even if half the entire payload mass was liquid nitrogen, it would certainly have absorbed all the heat it could within the first ''hour''.\\
Likewise, generating electric energy simply because it's hot outside won't work. You can only generate power if there's a temperature ''difference'', and heat is allowed to flow ''along'' that temperature difference -- unobtainium or no unobtainium. Any theoretically-possible scheme for using the hull to generate impeller power would have fried the contents within seconds.
*** Interestingly, because of gravity any journey through the planet, regardless of the start and end points, should supposedly only take about 45 minutes with an appropriate vehicle ([[MST3KMantra which they had]]); so enough liquid nitrogen to cool the ''Virgil'' for an hour would actually have been sufficient and even allow a decent amount of leeway.
** JustPlaneWrong: Not only does the Space Shuttle not rely exclusively on a magnetic compass for navigation, a magnetic compass isn't even part of its navigation package. Earth's normal geomagnetic field changes not only with latitude and longitude, it also changes with altitude, and at the altitude for Low Earth Orbit it's very different than it is down here on the surface. The shuttle determines its location partly by data fed to it from the ground -- which also doesn't rely on magnetic compasses -- and partly by extrapolating this data via its very limited onboard computers. (And nowadays, one would suppose, from GPS.)

to:

*** The Second Law of Thermodynamics, in particular, takes a mighty shellackin' in this movie. Even if unobtainium were a perfect insulator, so that no external heat could get in ''at all'', the interior of the ''Virgil'' would still generate an enormous amount of its own waste heat from human bodies, life support systems, electronics, the motors running the impellers, etc.. You ''saw'' and so on. Just look at how hot the nuclear reactor's core was. The only "heat sink" they brought along was some liquid nitrogen. Even if half the entire payload mass was liquid nitrogen, it would certainly have absorbed all the heat it could within the first ''hour''.\\
[[note: Although here we have a case of two scientific wrongs making a right: because of gravity, any journey through the planet, regardless of the start and end points, should supposedly only take about 45 minutes with an appropriate vehicle (which they had); so enough liquid nitrogen to cool the ''Virgil'' for an hour would actually have been sufficient and even allow a decent amount of leeway.]]
***
Likewise, generating electric energy simply because it's hot outside won't work. You can only generate power if there's a temperature ''difference'', and heat is allowed to flow ''along'' that temperature difference -- unobtainium or no unobtainium. Any theoretically-possible scheme for using the hull to generate impeller power would have fried the contents within seconds.
*** Interestingly, because of gravity any journey through the planet, regardless of the start and end points, should supposedly only take about 45 minutes with an appropriate vehicle ([[MST3KMantra which they had]]); so enough liquid nitrogen to cool the ''Virgil'' for an hour would actually have been sufficient and even allow a decent amount of leeway.
** JustPlaneWrong: Not only does the Space Shuttle not rely exclusively on a magnetic compass for navigation, a magnetic compass isn't even part of its navigation package. Earth's normal geomagnetic field changes not only with latitude and longitude, it but also changes with altitude, altitude; and at the altitude for Low Earth Orbit Orbit, it's very different than it is down here on the surface. The shuttle determines its location partly by data fed to it from the ground -- which also doesn't rely on magnetic compasses -- and partly by extrapolating this data via its very limited onboard computers. (And nowadays, one would suppose, from GPS.)
11th Jun '17 8:23:29 PM nombretomado
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** "I'm gonna need an unlimited supply of {{Xena}} tapes and Hot Pockets."

to:

** "I'm gonna need an unlimited supply of {{Xena}} ''Series/{{Xena|Warrior Princess}}'' tapes and Hot Pockets."
10th May '17 10:36:07 AM CosmicFerret
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''The Core'' is a 2003 DisasterMovie directed by Jon Amiel, with a cast including Aaron Eckhart, Creator/HilarySwank, Delroy Lindo, and Creator/StanleyTucci.

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''The Core'' is a 2003 DisasterMovie directed by Jon Amiel, with a cast including Aaron Eckhart, Creator/AaronEckhart, Creator/HilarySwank, Delroy Lindo, and Creator/StanleyTucci.
8th Apr '17 3:47:32 PM erana
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Added DiffLines:

*** Now that we're with the core's weight (and thus, density), at some point they get the surprise that the core is supposedly of a different density than they ''thought'' (emphasis added) it had. The movie handwaves it with a variant of "hey, nobody has ever been down there to ''measure'' the core's density" (again, emphasis added). Never mind that said density ''has'' been accurately ''measured'' by how it affects seismic waves' (from earthquakes of known origin) propagation, a measurement that has been verified by how it's used to accurately calculate back the position of new quakes by their seismic waves' propagation through the core.
14th Mar '17 2:48:52 PM Kalaong
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Added DiffLines:

*TheChainsOfCommanding: There's an excellent speech on this.
-->'''Col. Robert Iverson''': Being a leader isn't about ability. It's about ''responsibility.'' I mean, you're not just responsible for making good decisions. You have to be responsible for the bad ones. You got to be ready to make the shitty call. ...Because you're so good, you haven't hit anything you couldn't beat. I mean, hell, you were the one who figured out how to save the shuttle. You made me, you made the rest of NASA just look like an ass. It's just that you're used to winning -- and you're not really a leader until you've lost.
24th Sep '16 3:34:36 PM saberwyn
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** The ''Virgil'' itself, in a way, as every last subsidiary compartment is lost or sacrificed over the course of the film.



** The ''Virgil'' itself, in a way, as every last subsidiary compartment is lost or sacrificed over the course of the film.
20th Aug '16 6:09:55 PM BiffJr
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** ArtisticLicenseMedicine: A failure of the Earth's magnetic field isn't going to stop a pacemaker (or a wristwatch, for that matter), and even if it did, the heart the pacemaker is attached to wouldn't suddenly stop beating entirely. Pacemakers are given to patients with ''irregular'' or ''erratic'' heartbeats. A failed pacemaker may be a medical emergency, but it's not a guaranteed instant death sentence.
*** There is one possible justification: the shifting magnetic field induced electrical current into the wiring and electrodes around the heart. The pacemaker isn't the killer, it's simply the means. Accidental minor electrical shock via current generated by shifting magnetic fields that puts the patient into ventricular fibrillation. At least it's a shorter stretch than everything else in this flick.

to:

** ArtisticLicenseMedicine: A failure of the Earth's magnetic field isn't going to stop a pacemaker (or a wristwatch, for that matter), and even if it did, the heart the pacemaker is attached to wouldn't suddenly stop beating entirely. Pacemakers are given to patients with ''irregular'' or ''erratic'' heartbeats. A failed pacemaker may be a medical emergency, but it's not a guaranteed instant death sentence.
***
sentence. [[note]] There is one possible justification: the shifting magnetic field induced electrical current into the wiring and electrodes around the heart. The pacemaker isn't the killer, it's simply the means. Accidental minor electrical shock via current generated by shifting magnetic fields that puts the patient into ventricular fibrillation. At least it's a shorter stretch than everything else in this flick. [[/note]]
14th Aug '16 12:17:51 PM nombretomado
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** The ''[[DivineComedy Virgil]]''.

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** The ''[[DivineComedy ''[[Literature/TheDivineComedy Virgil]]''.
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