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Literal Player Character

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Video game trope. The existence of the player is acknowledged in-universe and they are treated as a character.

This work is a proposed Trope, Tropers can vote and offer feedback in the comments section below.
Proposed By:
WikiWanderer on Sep 7th 2018 at 11:32:17 AM
Last Edited By:
Arivne on Oct 23rd 2018 at 2:33:02 AM
Name Space: Main
Page Type: trope

Niko: in the house, i found this... computer. It kept saying stuff like "your actions here will affect Niko." But... I'm Niko! Are those messages meant for someone else?
Prophetbot: hm... if I had to guess, they might be trying to pass the message to <Player_name>
OneShot

Player and Protagonist Integration taken Up to Eleven. This is a subtrope of Addressing the Player and a form of Meta Fiction wherein a Video Game incorporates the fact that it is a video game into the story. The player is essentially a character in these games, usually the main character; Even if they are not, they can't help but be the Point-of-view character in a way.

Sometimes the in-universe explanation for a game being self-aware is that the game you're playing is haunted or something to that effect, Which makes it a fictional game and a real game at the same time. This kind of explanation is not always present however, in some cases the characters in the game are just aware that they are fictional and will discuss this with the player and maybe even ask the player for help. They at least know something about the reality the player lives in, even if they don't necessarily see themselves as fictional.

This trope will usually put a game towards the soft end of the Sliding Scale of Fourth Wall Hardness, but there are cases where the player is controlling an In-universe Video Game character; there is an in-game character who is controlling a game character in-universe.

This trope can be used to make the player feel more connected to what's going on, often making this trope overlap with The Fourth Wall Will Not Protect You. A game on PC may get into the computer's OS to address the player by their real name in a Wham Line. Otherwise the player will usually be referred to as some variant of "the person behind the screen" or another description that makes it clear who they are speaking to.

Often overlaps with Exploiting the Fourth Wall, From Beyond the Fourth Wall, The Fourth Wall Will Not Protect You and Playing the Player.

Compare to The Game Come to Life and Trapped in TV Land. Contrast with The Player Is the Most Important Resource and Fourth-Wall Mail Slot, which adress the player in different ways. Contrast with A God is You as well, this is where the reality the player lives in isn't brought up but they exist on higher plane of existence than the other characters (the two can overlap, but make sure the player is explicitly brought up as a person behind a computer screen or something to that effect before adding examples).

note: addressing the player character to send a message to the player is not usually an example.There has to be some element that makes it clear the game is addressing the player directly, and it only counts as this trope if it has a role in the story and isn't just a one-time gag. If the player is mentioned but their place in the world of the story isn't brought up and they don't affect the plot, that's Addressing the Player.

As this aspect of a game is often a Wham Line, beware of unmarked spoilers.


Examples

    open/close all folders 

    Action-Adventure 
  • Assassin's Creed
    • The series plays with this. the player actually takes control of Desmond, and he is in a computer taking control of a computer reconstruction of one of his ancestors. So while you are controlling a character in an in-universe simulation, parts of the game also have you controlling Desmond.
    • Assassin's Creed III: Liberation and Assassin's Creed: Unity are framed as Abstergo-published games that are intended as Templar propaganda, but get hijacked by Assassins who contact you with the bits Abstergo cut out (Liberation) or an entirely new set of data they want analysed (Unity).
    Adventure Game 
  • Omikron: The Nomad Soul begins with a cop from an alternate universe asking you, the player, to send your soul into his universe, possess his recently deceased body, and investigate his death. As the adventure continues, several characters learn that you're the "Nomad Soul" who isn't from their world. Also, your ability possess different people to becomes a major game mechanic. Then it's revealed that the videogame you're playing, Omikron: The Nomad Soul, was actually created by demons, as a way to trick gamers from our universe into sending their souls to Hell.
  • OneShot: after clearing the first room, Niko reads a message on a computer monitor, which is clearly intended for the player. The last line of the message is a pop-up: "you only have one shot, Player_Name". Other characters in the game refer to the player as a god, and Niko is the Messiah who is the only person capable of conversing with the player directly. At the end it's revealed that even the fact that the player downloaded the game on their PC is an aspect of the story, as the world is a digital simulation created when it was discovered help would arrive too late.Even the game's trailer fits into this
  • This trope is implied in The Stanley Parable. You are required to use a code given to you by the Narrator, which Stanley shouldn't know about (Lampshaded), and there is an ending in which the player leaves Stanley's body, leaving Stanley just standing there while the Narrator pleads with him to just go forward.
  • You find yourself in a room is a flash game with the tagline "a game that slowly realizes it hates you and everything you stand for"
    Beat Em Up 
  • In Teen Titans, At the end of the game, it turns out the reason for all the random chaos is because the developers are putting them through these situations merely to entertain "You there on the couch". You are the Big Bad
    Fighting Game 
  • Dragon Ball Fighter Z's storyline starts off with Bulma approaching Goku after the city just got wrecked by mysterious forces. Bulma notices that Goku isn't acting like himself, and can tell something is off. When Beerus and Whis arrive to scope out the situation, they detect that another soul has inhabited Goku's body and is currently controlling it. The real Goku is deep inside and making an effort to communicate. Part of the story itself focuses on the player's soul jumping from character to character to help fight off the villains of the story.
  • In Super Smash Bros. 4, Duck Hunt is a trio of characters from the game Duck Hunt. If you fight using Duck Hunt, you're playing as the dog hunting partner, one of the ducks, and as the player holding the NES Zapper.
  • Virtual-ON
    First Person Shooter 
  • Spec Ops: The Line hints that this trope is in play, but it's up to interpretation. At the start the player just controls Walker like any other first person shooter, but as the game goes on and things go wrong several characters have lines with double meanings that could address the player or Walker or both. One notable instance has a character saying "you didn't give us a choice" and "you made us do this" to Walker, but the camera angle makes it look like he's looking out of the screen at you. By the end of the game Walker's gone off the deep end. It's all down to personal interpretation whether you just watched like you would with any other story, he's an extension of you and you messed up, you followed him on his journey to try to fix things, or you forced him to press on and do those awful things.
  • The plot of [[Video Game/Superhot Super Hot]] starts with the player receiving an early copy of a video game called superhot.exe from a friend. The presence of another "real world" character makes this a downplayed example, as this character fictionalizes the world the player belongs to.
    Massively Multiplayer Online Game 
  • Mabinogi has it that the character you play as is the avatar of the player's will, very meta, and characters will bring it up. Most don't know about computers or video games specifically, but understand that you're of a race who form immortal bodies of mutable age and sex to experience other universes where most of you don't treat the place or people as especially real. The implications of this are sometimes touched on in a light manner. Pretty direct.
    Platform Game 
  • Tearaway's plot revolves around the player interacting with the world to help the messenger deliver a message to them.
  • Skylanders: Players serve as the portal master having to place skylanders on their portal of power in order to send them to Skylands in order to face Kaos and his minions. While Master Eon usually the only one to speak to them, Everybody is aware of the Player's existence. In Trap Team, Kaos even swears to come after the portal masters after he conquers Skylands.
    Puzzle Game 
  • The premise of Pony Island is that you have discovered a possessed arcade cabinet, and parts of the game involve going through the programming.Subverted. You're in Hell, playing an arcade game designed by Satan. Initially everything's vague enough, you could believe the player character is supposed to be you, but you eventually discover details about the PC's backstory that make this impossible. In particular, the PC is a knight who died fighting in the Crusades.
    Role Playing Game 
  • Contact for the Nintendo DS
    • It is an RPG entirely built around this trope; the characters acknowledge the player as an entity from another dimension whom they are somehow able to communicate with, and who uses a computing device called a "Nintendo DS" to exert a mysterious influence over their world. The player is asked for his or her real name (and favourite food, and home town) when starting a new game, and remains a main character in the story from start to finish.
    • Turned on its ass by the end of the game, where the characters turn on you. All of them. Including all of the bad guys, and the character you've been playing for the whole game. The last thing you do is fight your character. You win, and your character declares that he hates you, and leaves.
  • CrossCode is Action RPG taking place inside a fictional MMORPG called CrossWorlds. This online game is the key to unlocking the memories of the amnesiac main character, Lea. Since the game takes place inside an online game, other characters in the game are also players with lives outside of the game world.
  • The finale of Earthbound plays out like this: After a few turns of Paula's prayers being "swallowed by the darkness," they will reach the player, who is mentioned by name, their name having been obtained via a phone call from Tony back in Summers. The player will then defeat Giygas with the push of a button, because Giygas is nothing but a few lines of code to a real person.
  • MOTHER 3 also asks the player's name in two occasions, once in the Prayer Sanctuary near Tazmily and in the Clayman factory. At the very end of the game, the characters are relieved to notice that the player is okay after what seemed like an Apocalypse How and proceed to converse with him or her a bit. Mostly they thank you for helping out, but they also wonder what our world is like and ask that world to treat you kindly. Finally, they hope that they can meet you again soon. It's hard not to feel a little warm and fuzzy inside during this.
  • The Ultima games are an example of this, in that while the main character has a defined appearance, it's established that the Avatar actually is the player, using their computer to materialise a new body in another world. The same is true for Lord British, who literally is series creator Richard Garriott.
  • Undertale: At the end of a genocide run, the soul inside the player character will thank the player for releasing him (It Makes Sense in Context, we will call the soul "Chara" from now on.) Chara will ask the player whether or not they should erase the world, but will do it regardless of your answer. If you want to start a new game, you have to wait on a blank screen for a while before Chara gives you the option.
    Simulation Game 
  • The Simpsons: Tapped Out acknowledges the player as "Sky Finger", who inexplicably restores Springfield bit by bit with its tapping power. The game's Title Screen and promotional images depict Homer running for dear life from it, although they seem more chummy in later events.note Take That, Audience! is in effect here, as game will assume Sky Finger to be the kind of player who haphazardly plops everything anywhere without rhyme or reason. Declan Desmond's quest-line leads to an investigation on Sky Finger which reveals it to be that of a 7-year-old with ADHD.
    Blue-Haired Lawyer: OBJECTION! Sky Finger couldn't be a child — you have to enter your age to play.
    Judge Snyder: Overruled. He could have been playing on his parent's device.
    Stealth Based Game 
  • Metal Gear Solid 2: Sons of Liberty
    • Heavily deconstructs this trope. You control a new character in the series named Raiden, a whiny rookie who underwent extensive "virtual reality training" (meaning, he played a lot of video games) wherein he controlled a simulacrum of the protagonist of the last three games. Though Raiden fancies himself a badass because of that, as he goes about his mission he clearly has identity issues and is using his fabricated self-image to indulge in Escapism and avoid confronting his own personality. Which is exactly why his superior officers, who are revealed as the bad guys, chose him for his mission: they needed a weak-minded dupe longing for escapism to test whether they could control the human race through censorship and information control. As they insinuate that Sons of Liberty itself is the culmination of their efforts, the fourth wall crumbles and the line between player and protagonist blurs into non-existence. You realize you were never playing the game; it was playing you the whole time. But there's a spot of hope: after defeating the final boss, Raiden looks down at his dogtags, which have the player's name on them, and then throws them away, symbolically resolving to no longer be a controllable character.
    • Which only lasts until Metal Gear Rising: Revengeance, in which Raiden is once again under the player's control. But this time he doesn't seem to mind. Or even notice.
    Visual Novel 
  • Doki Doki Literature Club!: The game starts out like a regular Dating Sim, but after Sayori's suicide weird things start happening. Turns out this was the work of Monika, who was jealous that she's not one of the girls you can date and hacked the game to make the other girls less attractive to you. At the end of the game, the game will dig through the player's files and she will refer to the player by their real name.
    Other 


Non-video game examples:

    Web Comics 
  • In MS Paint Adventures, which is formatted like a text-input adventure game where clicking "commands" brings you the next page, there are a few times where commands prompt the reader and the comic depicts a hypothetical reader reacting to things in the comic. For example, "MSPA readers: react to update" in Problem Sleuth, or any number of examples from Homestuck including "[S] MSPA Reader: Mental Breakdown".
    Web Video 
    Western Animation 
  • Dora the Explorer revolves around the main characters asking their viewers solutions to problems (the show was initially meant to be a computer game).

Feedback: 63 replies

Sep 7th 2018 at 11:38:56 AM

  • Dragon Ball Fighter Z's storyline starts off with Bulma approaching Goku after the city just got wrecked by mysterious forces. Bulma notices that Goku isn't acting like himself, and can tell something is off. When Beerus and Whis arrive to scope out the situation, they detect that another soul has inhabited Goku's body and is currently controlling it. The real Goku is deep inside and making an effort to communicate. Part of the story itself focuses on the player's soul jumping from character to character to help fight off the villains of the story.

Sep 7th 2018 at 12:24:58 PM

Tearawayís plot revolves around the player interacting with the world to help the messenger deliver a message to them.

Sep 7th 2018 at 2:22:06 PM

Addressing The Player seems related to the point of this being a possible duplicate.

Also, several examples don't have the player as the main character. Probably not a good idea to state that as fact in the trope title.

Sep 7th 2018 at 2:34:27 PM

^ You may be right. The Doki Doki Literature Club and Undertale examples are already listed there.

Sep 7th 2018 at 2:49:07 PM

  • Although subtle compared with other examples, the Brutalities in Mortal Kombat X have the characters addressing the player after finishing his character.

Sep 7th 2018 at 2:52:20 PM

  • Omikron The Nomad Soul begins with a cop from an alternate universe asking you, the player, to send your soul into his universe, possess his recently deceased body, and investigate his death. As the adventure continues, several characters learn that you're the "Nomad Soul" who isn't from their world. Also, your ability possess different people to becomes a major game mechanic. Then it's revealed that the videogame you're playing, Omikron: The Nomad Soul, was actually created by demons, as a way to trick gamers from our universe into sending their souls to Hell.

Sep 7th 2018 at 3:45:51 PM

^^^ yeah, henke37 may indeed be right. In my defense, that trope shouldíve been listed on the fourth wall page. I assumed that if this already existed it would be on there and didnít bother with trope finder. This could still count as a distinct trope if narrowed down and defined a bit though. Iím thinking only include games where the player is a part of the gameís world for something more substantial than just a Deus Ex Machina or whatever (like One Shot,Fighter Z or Omnikron) or there is no protagonist in the game other than ďthe playerĒ and the game takes place on a computer (I think Pony Island and Superhot are examples of this but Iíd have to look up the details before posting those to make sure Iíve got my facts straight).

Sep 7th 2018 at 4:04:22 PM

Wait, I don't remember any Brutalities in Mortal Kombat X breaking the 4th wall in any manner. What?

Sep 7th 2018 at 9:44:14 PM

Changed the description to address similarities with Addressing the player. Added some related tropes, though Iím not sure what goes under compare or contrast so Iíll leave it at compare/contrast for now. Added examples.

Since the player isnít always the main character I put it under Needs A Better Name. The best I can come up with is ďvideo game and real life integrationĒ. Any suggestions?

Sep 7th 2018 at 10:55:50 PM

  • Blue Linked Administrivia page names by adding the Administrivia namespace. Failure to do this causes Red Links.
  • Replaced garbage text (caused by non-standard text characters) with standard text characters.
  • Blue Linked TV Tropes page names.
  • Examples section
    • Added a line separating the Description and Examples section.
    • Italicized work names as per How To Write An Example - Emphasis For Work Names.
    • Blue Linked work names.
    • Capitalized the first words of sentences.
    • Removed unnecessary Pot Holing of work names.
    • Added media section titles as per Media Categories.

Sep 8th 2018 at 2:33:23 AM

^^ DRCEQ, pay attention to who the winners refer after they finish their opponent. There's no reason to tell "learn from this" to a dead body.

Sep 8th 2018 at 3:01:41 AM

^That's Addressing The Player. Cheeky fourth wall comments don't count, this trope is for instances where the player is referred to in-universe and they also affect the plot.

Sep 8th 2018 at 3:13:48 AM

^ If they don't affect the plot, that's Addressing The Player?

Sep 8th 2018 at 3:38:31 AM

^ Yes, I think there's a difference between Breaking The Fourth Wall for a gag and integrating the fact that a video game has someone behind the screen controlling the characters into the story. Does that make sense?

Sep 8th 2018 at 6:44:41 AM

I think this is currently listed as "You Are You" category of Player And Protagonist Integration.

Sep 8th 2018 at 6:57:55 AM

Spoiler in "Doki Doki" needs to be fixed.

Sep 8th 2018 at 7:35:43 AM

^^that just saves me the trouble of coming up with a better name then lol. ^Fixed!

Still can't get the page quote right though, even though I literally copied it from another page and pasted new text over it. Honestly I think this quote might count as a spoiler, but it's a spoiler to something that happens 3 minutes into a 3 hour game and is a big draw of the game, so I don't think it's a big deal.

Rephrased and changed some stuff, hopefully the distinction between this and Addressing The Player is clear now. Also added some new examples.

Sep 8th 2018 at 8:36:46 AM

"(I think Pony Island and Superhot are examples of this but Iíd have to look up the details before posting those to make sure Iíve got my facts straight)."

Pony Island isn't a straight example, but I guess you could call it a subversion. You're in Hell, playing an arcade game designed by Satan. Initially everything's vague enough, you could believe the player character is supposed to be you, but you eventually discover details about the PC's backstory that make this impossible. In particular, the PC is a knight who died fighting in the Crusades.

Sep 8th 2018 at 9:15:58 AM

The current name for this sounds like a character naming trope, where the character is named "Yu" or "You" (which is a Chinese name, apparently). Also, it violates No New Stock Phrases because it's a whole sentence.

I can't think of any particularly better names, but here's some that I came up with:

Sep 8th 2018 at 9:28:45 AM

^Good point. I also think this is a level above what is known as "you are you" on Player And Protaganist Integration because the video game is a video game (god, this trope is weird to explain sometimes) in-universe for this trope and that isn't specified. I think a Title Crowner is in order here, does anyone have any other suggestions?

Sep 8th 2018 at 9:46:00 AM

In MS Paint Adventures, which is formatted like a text-input adventure game where clicking "commands" brings you the next page, there are a few times where commands prompt the reader and the comic depicts a hypothetical reader reacting to things in the comic. For example, "MSPA readers: react to update" in Problem Sleuth, or any number of examples from Homestuck including "[S] MSPA Reader: Mental Breakdown".

Sep 9th 2018 at 12:17:50 AM

Raided Player And Protagonist Integration for examples. Also fixed the compare/contrast section after asking the tropers about it (thanks, Water Blap)

Sep 9th 2018 at 12:28:16 AM

^^^^I want to set up a crowner, but Water Blap's suggested titles are all just a bit too specific for this trope (Player Character Messaging Service implies the player is always some sort of messenger, Addressing Through The Player Character just sounds like Addressing The Player and Protagonist Player wouldn't work for the same reason You are the main character didn't work).

A couple of my own suggestions

Sep 9th 2018 at 4:12:49 AM

"Player Character Is The Player"?

Sep 9th 2018 at 9:23:21 AM

There's a crowner now!

https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/crowner.php/AlternativeTitles/YouAreYou?open=all#n4ozg9yh

I've also added a couple of terrible names that we should not be using, but figured I might as well throw 'em out there in case people like 'em

Sep 9th 2018 at 9:44:05 AM

What about Literal Player Character?

Also, those suggestions that are full sentences would be sent back by the crash rescue thread because of No New Stock Phrases.

Sep 9th 2018 at 9:47:56 AM

^I like that one, more than "real player, fictional game". Which ones are stock phrases though? Surely the phrase "you are the player character" won't come up that much.

Sep 10th 2018 at 1:59:10 AM

Made a minor addition and while I'm bumping this up I might as well point out that I'm aware of the abundance of YMMV examples and will put them in a separate section later.

Sep 10th 2018 at 4:37:49 AM

I've organised the examples into 3 categories. I'm considering loosening the definition of this trope a bit by simply calling the YMMV examples "Type C" and saying that this is just a more indirect form of applying the trope.

Sep 10th 2018 at 5:37:36 AM

raided Addressing The Player for 3 more examples. Not sure why I didn't think to do this before since this is an actual subtrope of that but there you are. Some of the other examples might count as well, but the descriptions are too ambiguous to tell.

Sep 10th 2018 at 11:20:30 AM

If you read the Administrivia page, you'll see that literally being a stock phrase is not the point. The title cannot be a complete sentence, as a rule.

Sep 10th 2018 at 11:55:02 AM

Oh, right.

Also, I still don't know how to cut and paste text apparently. I actually have a page image I want to use but I'm a bit afraid of what will happen when I attempt it...

Sep 11th 2018 at 8:19:58 AM

Remembered the Petscop example. I'll fix issues with markup and the like later (probably need help with that page quote though; for some reason I can't input those properly on this particular page even though Quotes Wiki works just fine)

Sep 12th 2018 at 11:35:24 AM

crowner bump and yes I know I said I would fix issues with markup, I'll do it eventually don't @ me.

Sep 13th 2018 at 12:37:24 AM

Alright I fixed it (except the page quote, which I don't get what I'm doing wrong). I see someone bombed this already, my fault for being lazy I guess.

Sep 13th 2018 at 1:27:22 PM

Please see Type Labels Are Not Examples, particularly where it says "Avoid assigning positional number/letter labels to a soft split or sliding scale."

Moreover, I'm not sure why this was split into types. The description is really confusing atm.

Sep 13th 2018 at 1:55:36 PM

^I feel like an idiot because you keep having to explain these things to me. Is there a full list of things dipshit newcomers get wrong somewhere?

Also, yeah, the line between types is way too blurry.

Also I should probably save that other page quote somewhere and put it in a quoteswiki later because itís a bit too long and the other one is better anyway as well as an excellent way to pimp One Shot

And knowing me thereís probably a strict rule about YMMV examples I completely missed somewhere

Iím too tired to fix any of these things right now but Iíll get to it tomorrow

Sep 13th 2018 at 4:18:30 PM

'we will call the soul "chara" from now on.' Chara should have a capital letter, especially since the rest of the entry has it capitalised.

Sep 14th 2018 at 11:27:51 AM

okay so I fixed the obvious stuff but if something is confusing to you please give feedback about it.

Nobody seems to leave any comments here for some reason and I feel like I'm in a ghost town

Sep 14th 2018 at 7:08:21 PM

I don't understand what this is trying to trope.

Sep 14th 2018 at 11:46:38 PM

^this trope is for games where the player is a part of the gameís world, not because they made a Custom Character that looks like them but because the game explicitly (or sometimes implicitly in the YMMV section) brings up that thereís a person behind a screen influencing the events. I tried to split it into sections because sometimes thereís a story behind the game that itís haunted, but unlike most haunted things in media youíre the one directly interacting with it (so itís a fictional game because obviously itís not actually haunted, but itís also a real game that you can play.)

Sep 15th 2018 at 1:23:20 AM

Sep 17th 2018 at 8:14:48 AM

I don't understand the YMMV examples. I'm having a hard time following what's going on in those examples, or how they relate to the trope as a whole.

I'm also not clear on how this is different from Addressing The Player.

Sep 17th 2018 at 8:59:09 AM

Yeah, the YMMV examples have to go, a trope cannot be both objective and subjective

Sep 19th 2018 at 2:01:47 PM

For the record, I gave this a bomb because of the weird formatting and type labels. But I won't give it a hat (and remove that bomb) until the title and example issues are hashed out. Please recall that YMMV and Audience Reactions are not tropes, and that this is clearly an objective trope. YMMV and objective tropes are mutually exclusive.

I'm not totally sure how this would be redundant with Addressing The Player. ATP requires the player to input their name, or the game taking their username, and using it in such a way as to involve or confuse the player. This concerns the game having the player as a character in some fashion. I think the description needs work to further distinguish these, as the paragraph starting with "this trope can be used to make the player feel more connected to what's going on" is pretty heavy overlap with Addressing The Player.

Anyway, an example of the player playing a player would be...:

  • In Super Smash Bros 4, Duck Hunt is a trio of characters from the game Duck Hunt. If you fight using Duck Hunt, you're playing as the dog hunting partner, one of the ducks, and as the player holding the NES Zapper.

Sep 24th 2018 at 1:26:33 AM

bump. It looks like "literal player character" will win the crowner, but if I understand How Crowners Work correctly I'll have to keep it open until it has 10 upvotes. I fixed the YMMV issue btw; the examples are on the regular list and references to the section in the description have been removed.

Sep 25th 2018 at 7:45:05 PM

  • The Simpsons Tapped Out acknowledges the player as "Sky Finger", who inexplicably restores Springfield bit by bit with its tapping power. The game's Title Screen and promotional images depict Homer running for dear life from it, although they seem more chummy in later events.note  That That Audience is in effect here, as game will assume Sky Finger to be the kind of player who haphazardly plops everything anywhere without rhyme or reason. Declan Desmond's quest-line leads to an investigation on Sky Finger which reveals it to be that of a 7-year-old with ADHD.
    Blue-Haired Lawyer: OBJECTION! Sky Finger couldn't be a child — you have to enter your age to play.
    Judge Snyder: Overruled. He could have been playing on his parent's device.

Sep 28th 2018 at 6:25:03 AM

The finale of Earthbound plays out like this: After a few turns of Paula's prayers being "swallowed by the darkness," they will reach the player, who is mentioned by name, their name having been obtained via a phone call from Tony back in Summers. The player will then defeat Giygas with the push of a button, because Giygas is nothing but a few lines of code to a real person.

Oct 16th 2018 at 12:08:48 AM

modified the description a bit and added Cross Code.

Oct 16th 2018 at 12:15:13 AM

the name should probably be changed to literal player character at this point but How Crowners Work says to send a holler to the staff and I'm not sure how to do that.

Oct 16th 2018 at 4:24:13 AM

Doki Doki is a Visual Novel, not a Video Game.

Oct 16th 2018 at 12:55:20 PM

^^ Most of that page applies only to forum threads, not the TRS. I think you're good to change the name.

Oct 19th 2018 at 3:48:28 PM

During one of Metal Gear Solid's codec conversations, Master Miller tells Snake to use his instincts as a soldier and a gamer, and at other times will tell Snake not to play in a darkened room, or that they should be prepared to spend a long time in front of a monitor if there's a long cutscene.

Oct 19th 2018 at 6:36:08 PM

^ Metal Gear Solid plays fast and loose around the 4th Wall without technically breaking it. Master Miller and many other characters still talk to Snake as the character he is. It's more like a weird case of He Knows Timed Hits than directly addressing the player behind the controller.

Oct 19th 2018 at 9:23:04 PM

BTW, I would suggest sorting the games by Genre. Prolly would help it better in getting hats.

Oct 22nd 2018 at 4:58:10 AM

^Everything's in a folder now, thanks for the suggestion

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