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** When Simon discovers that the beast isn't real, warns the other boys during a storm instead of waiting for it to pass. They mistake him for the beast and kill him.

to:

** When Simon discovers that the beast isn't real, he warns the other boys during a storm instead of waiting for it to pass. They mistake him for the beast and kill him.

Added DiffLines:

* FridgeHorror: What will the boys, particularly Roger and Jack, be like when they become older? Could Roger, having killed Piggy and coming close to killing Ralph, be capable of much worse?


** Simon realizes that the beast isn't real during a storm. Rather than wait for it to pass, he warns them immediately which leads to Jack's gang mistaking him for the beast and killing him.

to:

** When Simon realizes discovers that the beast isn't real real, warns the other boys during a storm. Rather than wait storm instead of waiting for it to pass, he warns them immediately which leads to Jack's gang mistaking pass. They mistake him for the beast and killing kill him.


** Simon tried to tell the other boys about the beast not being real in the middle of a storm rather than wait for it to pass. Jack's gang mistakes him for the beast and they kill him.

to:

** Simon tried to tell the other boys about realizes that the beast not being isn't real in the middle of during a storm rather storm. Rather than wait for it to pass. pass, he warns them immediately which leads to Jack's gang mistakes mistaking him for the beast and they kill killing him.


** Simon warns the boys about the beast in the middle of a storm rather than wait for it to pass. Jack's gang mistakes him for the beast and they kill him.

to:

** Simon warns tried to tell the other boys about the beast not being real in the middle of a storm rather than wait for it to pass. Jack's gang mistakes him for the beast and they kill him.


* WhatAnIdiot: Piggy telling Ralph about a nickname he doesn't want to be called.

to:

* WhatAnIdiot: WhatAnIdiot:
**
Piggy telling Ralph about a nickname he doesn't want to be called.called.
** Simon warns the boys about the beast in the middle of a storm rather than wait for it to pass. Jack's gang mistakes him for the beast and they kill him.


* HilariousInHindsight: [[WesternAnimation/SpongeBobSquarepants Using a conch shell to represent authority.]] Though that episode was likely a reference to "Lord of the Flies.''

to:

* HilariousInHindsight: [[WesternAnimation/SpongeBobSquarepants Using a conch shell to represent authority.]] Though that episode was likely a reference to "Lord ''Lord of the Flies.''''
** There's a number of stories about schoolteachers attempting to replicate the anarchy by leaving students alone and subtly (or blatantly) encouraging them to cause chaos, only for the students to not cause any trouble whatsoever.


* InternetBackdraft: A considerable number of people got up in arms when it was announced that a {{Gender Flip}}ped movie adaptation was coming, with many arguing that [[http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/08/31/all-female-lord-flies-remake-faces-backlash-misses-point-women/ the story only happens because of the entirely male cast]], since [[MenUseViolenceWomenUseCommunication males are allowed to be more violent and barbaric, while girls are heavily discouraged to act like that]]. Even ignoring that, the basic premise of the book was to show how young boys, when left to their own without adults to supervisor, could resort to becoming violent and animalistic. By swapping the genders, the entire point of the original story gets lost, especially since unless the film addresses the gender differences, it will come across as a ShallowParody. However, there have also been points brought up that the social conditioning of girls would result in a differently run, yet equally chaotic society.


** When news of an all female remake was announced, there was quite a bit of backlash with the (mostly female) detractors arguing that the book was about male power and that women "aren't allowed to act like that" when stranded on an island. The detractors point to Golding's intent and statements about aggressive boys and more fragile girls as proof of his themes. However, Golding's viewpoint comes across as outdated since more critical looks on gender, its roles and even the nature of the binary would question his simple and essentialist worldview, especially given that women are now more integrated into male professions and roles, while men who espouse survival of the fittest are viewed as "toxic". In essence, the modern day perception is that men and women are more likely to be the product of the environment that raises them, which could also fit the theme of the story. While the biological aspects of wherever this would work or not, or if social integration is enough to override binary pre-dispositions are up for debate, [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgement let's leave that to the experts since no one really has an answer yet.]]

to:

** When news of an all female remake was announced, there was quite a bit of backlash with the (mostly female) detractors arguing that the book was about male power and that women "aren't allowed to act like that" when stranded on an island. The detractors point to Golding's intent and statements about aggressive boys and more fragile girls as proof of his themes. However, Golding's viewpoint comes across as outdated since more critical looks on gender, its roles and even the nature of the binary would question his simple and essentialist worldview, especially given that women are now more integrated into male professions and roles, while men who espouse survival of the fittest are viewed as "toxic". In essence, the modern day perception is that men and women are more likely to be the product of the environment that raises them, which could also fit the theme of the story. While the biological aspects of wherever this would work or not, or if social integration is enough to override binary pre-dispositions are up for debate, [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgement [[Administrivia/RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgment let's leave that to the experts since no one really has an answer yet.]]


** When news of an all female remake was announced, there was quite a bit of backlash with the (mostly female) detractors arguing that the book was about male power and that women "aren't allowed to act like that" when stranded on an island. The detractors point to Golding's intent and statements about aggressive boys and more fragile girls as proof of his themes. However, Golding's viewpoint comes across as outdated since more critical looks on gender, its roles and even the nature of the binary would question his simple and essentialist worldview, especially given that women are now more integrated into male professions and roles, while men who espouse survival of the fittest are viewed as "toxic". In essence, the modern day perception is that men and women are more likely to be the product of the environment that raises them, which could also fit the theme of the story. While the biological aspects of wherever this would work or not, or if social integration is enough to override binary pre-dispositions are up for debate, [[RuleofCautiousEditingJudgment let's leave that to the experts since no one really has an answer yet.]]

to:

** When news of an all female remake was announced, there was quite a bit of backlash with the (mostly female) detractors arguing that the book was about male power and that women "aren't allowed to act like that" when stranded on an island. The detractors point to Golding's intent and statements about aggressive boys and more fragile girls as proof of his themes. However, Golding's viewpoint comes across as outdated since more critical looks on gender, its roles and even the nature of the binary would question his simple and essentialist worldview, especially given that women are now more integrated into male professions and roles, while men who espouse survival of the fittest are viewed as "toxic". In essence, the modern day perception is that men and women are more likely to be the product of the environment that raises them, which could also fit the theme of the story. While the biological aspects of wherever this would work or not, or if social integration is enough to override binary pre-dispositions are up for debate, [[RuleofCautiousEditingJudgment [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgement let's leave that to the experts since no one really has an answer yet.]]


** When news of an all female remake was announced, there was quite a bit of backlash with the (mostly female) detractors arguing that the book was about male power and that women "aren't allowed to act like that" when stranded on an island. The detractors point to Golding's intent and statements about aggressive boys and more fragile girls as proof of his themes. However, Golding's viewpoint comes across as outdated since more critical looks on gender, its roles and even the nature of the binary would question his simple and essentialist worldview, especially given that women are now more integrated into male professions and roles, while men who espouse survival of the fittest are viewed as "toxic". In essence, the modern day perception is that men and women are more likely to be the product of the environment that raises them, which could also fit the theme of the story.

to:

** When news of an all female remake was announced, there was quite a bit of backlash with the (mostly female) detractors arguing that the book was about male power and that women "aren't allowed to act like that" when stranded on an island. The detractors point to Golding's intent and statements about aggressive boys and more fragile girls as proof of his themes. However, Golding's viewpoint comes across as outdated since more critical looks on gender, its roles and even the nature of the binary would question his simple and essentialist worldview, especially given that women are now more integrated into male professions and roles, while men who espouse survival of the fittest are viewed as "toxic". In essence, the modern day perception is that men and women are more likely to be the product of the environment that raises them, which could also fit the theme of the story. While the biological aspects of wherever this would work or not, or if social integration is enough to override binary pre-dispositions are up for debate, [[RuleofCautiousEditingJudgment let's leave that to the experts since no one really has an answer yet.]]


%% Absolutely no Complete Monster entries are allowed here unless you come to the Special Efforts thread to justify it, and be COMPLETELY SURE it meets the criteria on the trope page and the forum's FAQ first: https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/posts.php?discussion=6vic3f9h1cy5qivsenw8llok.
%%



* ChaoticEvil: Jack's leading style. He is also the one that starts the whole chaos on the island.
%% Absolutely no Complete Monster entries are allowed here unless you come to the Special Efforts thread to justify it, and be REAL SURE it meets the criteria on the trope page and the forum's FAQ first: https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/posts.php?discussion=6vic3f9h1cy5qivsenw8llok.
%%



* InternetBackdraft: A considerable number of people got up in arms when it was announced that a {{Gender Flip}}ped movie adaptation was coming, with many arguing that [[http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/08/31/all-female-lord-flies-remake-faces-backlash-misses-point-women/ the story only happens because of the entirely male cast]], since [[MenUseViolenceWomenUseCommunication males are uniquely violent and barbaric, and girls just wouldn't act like that, you see]]. Even ignoring that, the basic premise of the book was to show how young boys, when left to their own without adults to supervisor, could resort to becoming violent and animalistic. By swapping the genders, the entire point of the original story gets lost, especially since unless the film addresses the gender differences, it will come across as a ShallowParody. However, there have also been points brought up that the social conditioning of girls would result in a differently run, yet equally chaotic society.

to:

* InternetBackdraft: A considerable number of people got up in arms when it was announced that a {{Gender Flip}}ped movie adaptation was coming, with many arguing that [[http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/08/31/all-female-lord-flies-remake-faces-backlash-misses-point-women/ the story only happens because of the entirely male cast]], since [[MenUseViolenceWomenUseCommunication males are uniquely allowed to be more violent and barbaric, and while girls just wouldn't are heavily discouraged to act like that, you see]].that]]. Even ignoring that, the basic premise of the book was to show how young boys, when left to their own without adults to supervisor, could resort to becoming violent and animalistic. By swapping the genders, the entire point of the original story gets lost, especially since unless the film addresses the gender differences, it will come across as a ShallowParody. However, there have also been points brought up that the social conditioning of girls would result in a differently run, yet equally chaotic society.



** Oddly enough, [[spoiler: the killing of a sow, with metaphors to make it sound like gang rape, is supposed to be the first indication the horizon has been crossed, or was about to be crossed pretty soon]].

to:

** Oddly enough, [[spoiler: the killing of a sow, with metaphors to make it sound like gang rape, is supposed to be the first indication the horizon has been crossed, or was or, at the very least, about to be crossed pretty soon]].crossed]].



** In the 90s film as well. Especially the way Ralph screams [[BigNo "NOOOOO!"]] [[spoiler:before Piggy gets killed, and that deadpan pause after his head gets crushed]].

to:

** In Same moment in the 90s film as well. Especially the way Ralph screams [[BigNo "NOOOOO!"]] [[spoiler:before Piggy gets killed, and that the deadpan pause after his head gets crushed]].



* OneTruePairing: Jack/Ralph is for those who like a love/hate romance. Ralph/Simon for those who love a cute, wholesome romance. Jack/Roger for those who are into a psycho dark romance between two psychos.

to:

* OneTruePairing: Depending on the preference: Jack/Ralph is for those who like a love/hate romance. romance, Ralph/Simon for those who love a cute, wholesome romance. romance, and Jack/Roger for those who are into a psycho dark romance between two psychos.



** The '63 film had prepubescent nudity. It was completely non-sexual and realistic, but because of the PaedoHunt, modern audiences are met with shock and disgust at the film showing young boys' boy parts.

to:

** The '63 film had prepubescent nudity. It was completely non-sexual and realistic, but because of the PaedoHunt, modern audiences are met with shock and disgust at the film showing young boys' boy private parts.



** When news of all female remake was announced, there was quite a bit of backlash with the (mostly female) detractors arguing that the book was about male power and that women "wouldn't act like that" when stranded on an island. The detractors point to Golding's intent and statements about aggressive boys and more fragile girls as proof of his themes. However, Golding's viewpoint comes across as outdated since more critical looks on gender, its roles and even the nature of the binary would question his simple and essentialist worldview, especially given that women are now more integrated into male professions and roles, while men who espouse survival of the fittest are viewed as "toxic". In essence, the modern day perception is that men and women are more likely to be the product of the environment that raises them, which could also fit the theme of the story.

to:

** When news of an all female remake was announced, there was quite a bit of backlash with the (mostly female) detractors arguing that the book was about male power and that women "wouldn't "aren't allowed to act like that" when stranded on an island. The detractors point to Golding's intent and statements about aggressive boys and more fragile girls as proof of his themes. However, Golding's viewpoint comes across as outdated since more critical looks on gender, its roles and even the nature of the binary would question his simple and essentialist worldview, especially given that women are now more integrated into male professions and roles, while men who espouse survival of the fittest are viewed as "toxic". In essence, the modern day perception is that men and women are more likely to be the product of the environment that raises them, which could also fit the theme of the story.

Added DiffLines:

** When news of all female remake was announced, there was quite a bit of backlash with the (mostly female) detractors arguing that the book was about male power and that women "wouldn't act like that" when stranded on an island. The detractors point to Golding's intent and statements about aggressive boys and more fragile girls as proof of his themes. However, Golding's viewpoint comes across as outdated since more critical looks on gender, its roles and even the nature of the binary would question his simple and essentialist worldview, especially given that women are now more integrated into male professions and roles, while men who espouse survival of the fittest are viewed as "toxic". In essence, the modern day perception is that men and women are more likely to be the product of the environment that raises them, which could also fit the theme of the story.
*** Of course, another camp believes that the book's view on HumansAreTheRealMonsters is outdated as a whole and that HumansAreGood when faced with peril, preferring cooperation to hostility.


* FamilyUnfriendlyAesop: The book was written just to say HumansAreBastards and HobbesWasRight, a TakeThat to all the RousseauWasRight works of the time. Some have read it as a [[FairForItsDay slightly friendlier]] {{a|nAesop}}esop against the racial stereotypes of the era, showing that under the wrong circumstances even British schoolboys fall into savagery just as easily as any "inferior" cultures.

to:

* FamilyUnfriendlyAesop: The book was written just to say HumansAreBastards and HobbesWasRight, a TakeThat to all the RousseauWasRight works of the time. Some have read it as a [[FairForItsDay slightly friendlier]] {{a|nAesop}}esop against the racial stereotypes of the era, showing that under the wrong circumstances even British schoolboys can fall into savagery just as easily as any "inferior" cultures.


* FamilyUnfriendlyAesop: The book was written just to say HumansAreBastards and HobbesWasRight, a TakeThat to all the RousseauWasRight works of the time. Some have read it as a slightly friendlier {{a|nAesop}}esop against the racial stereotypes of the era, showing that under the wrong circumstances even British schoolboys fall into savagery just as easily as any "inferior" cultures.

to:

* FamilyUnfriendlyAesop: The book was written just to say HumansAreBastards and HobbesWasRight, a TakeThat to all the RousseauWasRight works of the time. Some have read it as a [[FairForItsDay slightly friendlier friendlier]] {{a|nAesop}}esop against the racial stereotypes of the era, showing that under the wrong circumstances even British schoolboys fall into savagery just as easily as any "inferior" cultures.

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