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* TheUnfavorite: Anne gets upset when her mother Edith wishes that she would be as quiet and well-behaved as her sister, Margot.


** In 2010, the Culpeper County (Virginia) school board banned the 50th anniversary definitive version due to complaints about its sexual content and homosexual themes, with a similar controvery arising in Northville, Michigan in 2013 when a concerned mother referred to portions of the diary as "pretty pornographic".



* DownerEnding / ForegoneConclusion: [[spoiler:The Franks's hiding spot is betrayed to the Nazis.]]

to:

* DownerEnding / ForegoneConclusion: [[spoiler:The Franks's Franks' hiding spot is betrayed to the Nazis.]]


Added DiffLines:

* RomanAClef: Hermann, Auguste and Peter van Pels are known in the diary as the Van Daans, with Auguste known in the diary as Petronella while Peter's and Hermann's first names are kept.
** Fritz Pfeffer the dentist, is known in the diary as Albert Dussel.


The 1955 Pulitzer-Prize winner for Drama, ''The Diary of Anne Frank'' was Frances Goodrich and Albert Hackett's dramatization of Holocaust victim Anne Frank's diary (usually referred to as ''Literature/TheDiaryOfAYoungGirl'', which was the title of the first edition).[[''Film/TheDiaryOfAnneFrank''An Academy-Award winning film version]], staring Shelley Winters, was released in 1959.

to:

The 1955 Pulitzer-Prize winner for Drama, ''The Diary of Anne Frank'' was Frances Goodrich and Albert Hackett's dramatization of Holocaust victim Anne Frank's diary (usually referred to as ''Literature/TheDiaryOfAYoungGirl'', which was the title of the first edition).[[''Film/TheDiaryOfAnneFrank''An An Academy-Award winning film version]], version, staring Shelley Winters, was released in 1959.


The 1955 Pulitzer-Prize winner for Drama, ''The Diary of Anne Frank'' was Frances Goodrich and Albert Hackett's dramatization of Holocaust victim Anne Frank's diary (usually referred to as ''Literature/TheDiaryOfAYoungGirl'', which was the title of the first edition).[[ ''Film/TheDiaryOfAnneFrank''An Academy-Award winning film version]], staring Shelley Winters, was released in 1959.

to:

The 1955 Pulitzer-Prize winner for Drama, ''The Diary of Anne Frank'' was Frances Goodrich and Albert Hackett's dramatization of Holocaust victim Anne Frank's diary (usually referred to as ''Literature/TheDiaryOfAYoungGirl'', which was the title of the first edition).[[ ''Film/TheDiaryOfAnneFrank''An [[''Film/TheDiaryOfAnneFrank''An Academy-Award winning film version]], staring Shelley Winters, was released in 1959.


The 1955 Pulitzer-Prize winner for Drama, ''The Diary of Anne Frank'' was Frances Goodrich and Albert Hackett's dramatization of Holocaust victim Anne Frank's diary (usually referred to as ''Literature/TheDiaryOfAYoungGirl'', which was the title of the first edition). An Academy-Award winning film version ''Film/TheDiaryOfAnneFrank'', staring Shelley Winters, was released in 1959.

to:

The 1955 Pulitzer-Prize winner for Drama, ''The Diary of Anne Frank'' was Frances Goodrich and Albert Hackett's dramatization of Holocaust victim Anne Frank's diary (usually referred to as ''Literature/TheDiaryOfAYoungGirl'', which was the title of the first edition). An [[ ''Film/TheDiaryOfAnneFrank''An Academy-Award winning film version ''Film/TheDiaryOfAnneFrank'', version]], staring Shelley Winters, was released in 1959.


The 1955 Pulitzer-Prize winner for Drama, ''The Diary of Anne Frank'' was Frances Goodrich and Albert Hackett's dramatization of Holocaust victim Anne Frank's diary (usually referred to as ''Literature/TheDiaryOfAYoungGirl'', which was the title of the first edition). ''Film/TheDiaryOfAnneFrank''An Academy-Award winning film version, staring Shelley Winters, was released in 1959.

to:

The 1955 Pulitzer-Prize winner for Drama, ''The Diary of Anne Frank'' was Frances Goodrich and Albert Hackett's dramatization of Holocaust victim Anne Frank's diary (usually referred to as ''Literature/TheDiaryOfAYoungGirl'', which was the title of the first edition). ''Film/TheDiaryOfAnneFrank''An An Academy-Award winning film version, version ''Film/TheDiaryOfAnneFrank'', staring Shelley Winters, was released in 1959.


The 1955 Pulitzer-Prize winner for Drama, ''The Diary of Anne Frank'' was Frances Goodrich and Albert Hackett's dramatization of Holocaust victim Anne Frank's diary (usually referred to as ''Literature/TheDiaryOfAYoungGirl'', which was the title of the first edition). [[''Film/TheDiaryOfAnneFrank''An Academy-Award winning film version]], staring Shelley Winters, was released in 1959.

to:

The 1955 Pulitzer-Prize winner for Drama, ''The Diary of Anne Frank'' was Frances Goodrich and Albert Hackett's dramatization of Holocaust victim Anne Frank's diary (usually referred to as ''Literature/TheDiaryOfAYoungGirl'', which was the title of the first edition). [[''Film/TheDiaryOfAnneFrank''An ''Film/TheDiaryOfAnneFrank''An Academy-Award winning film version]], version, staring Shelley Winters, was released in 1959.


The 1955 Pulitzer-Prize winner for Drama, ''The Diary of Anne Frank'' was Frances Goodrich and Albert Hackett's dramatization of Holocaust victim Anne Frank's diary (usually referred to as ''Literature/TheDiaryOfAYoungGirl'', which was the title of the first edition). An Academy-Award winning film version, staring Shelley Winters, was released in 1959.

to:

The 1955 Pulitzer-Prize winner for Drama, ''The Diary of Anne Frank'' was Frances Goodrich and Albert Hackett's dramatization of Holocaust victim Anne Frank's diary (usually referred to as ''Literature/TheDiaryOfAYoungGirl'', which was the title of the first edition). An [[''Film/TheDiaryOfAnneFrank''An Academy-Award winning film version, version]], staring Shelley Winters, was released in 1959.


* BiTheWay: The first several rounds of publishing excluded excerpts from when Anne admits to being excited by the female body, even going so much as to reveal she kissed a friend and asked to feel her breasts. The {{Squick}} factor of this being a young girl not even in her teens is a justified explanation. The sections had been {{Bowdlerise}}d by her father, and weren't discovered until his death.

to:

* BiTheWay: The first several rounds of publishing excluded excerpts from when Anne admits to being excited by the female body, even going so much as to reveal she kissed a friend and asked to feel her breasts. The {{Squick}} factor of this being a young girl not barely even in her teens is a justified explanation. The sections had been {{Bowdlerise}}d by her father, and weren't discovered until his death.


* DownerEnding/ForegoneConclusion: [[spoiler:The Franks's hiding spot is betrayed to the Nazis.]]

to:

* DownerEnding/ForegoneConclusion: DownerEnding / ForegoneConclusion: [[spoiler:The Franks's hiding spot is betrayed to the Nazis.]]


* ForegoneConclusion: [[spoiler:The Franks's hiding spot is betrayed to the Nazis.]]

to:

* ForegoneConclusion: DownerEnding/ForegoneConclusion: [[spoiler:The Franks's hiding spot is betrayed to the Nazis.]]


* TokenMinority: One of the people hiding in the attic is an ethnic Jew, but follows the Christian faith.[[note]]This is Mr. Dussel, but his character was written to be TheWatson in order for Jewish customs to be explained to a non-Jewish audience. It is not true to the Diary nor to real life. Fritz Pfeffer (his real name) was actually more observant of Jewish customs than the Franks or Van Pelses (Van Daans), although the woman he had lived with was Catholic. Pfeffer's family was incensed at the portrayal of Dussel in the play and the 1959 movie.[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fritz_Pfeffer#Posthumous_reputation]] [[/note]]

to:

* TokenMinority: One of the people hiding in the attic is an ethnic Jew, but follows the Christian faith.[[note]]This is Mr. Dussel, but his character was written to be TheWatson CultureBlind in order for Jewish customs to be explained to a non-Jewish audience. It is not true to the Diary nor to real life. Fritz Pfeffer (his real name) was actually more observant of Jewish customs than the Franks or Van Pelses (Van Daans), although the woman he had lived with was Catholic. Pfeffer's family was incensed at the portrayal of Dussel in the play and the 1959 movie.[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fritz_Pfeffer#Posthumous_reputation]] [[/note]]

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