Follow TV Tropes

Following

History TabletopGame / DiscworldRolePlayingGame

Go To


Added DiffLines:

* ContinuityNod: As a reference to how many times [[BadassInDistress he's survived plots against him]], Vetinari has the "Hard to Kill" advantage.


* CoolToy: The ''Pyramid'' scenario "[[http://www.sjgames.com/pyramid/sample.html?id=721 Watch Academy VI: Hogswatchnight]]" features the must-have toy in Ankh-Morpork this Hogswatch, which is -- of course -- secretly part of a Sinister and Eldritch Plot. In the scenario as written they're quasi-intelligent furry things called [[Toys/{{Furby}} Burfies]], but the author recommends adapting them to whatever the Cool Toy is at the time the game is played.

to:

* CoolToy: The ''Pyramid'' scenario "[[http://www.sjgames.com/pyramid/sample.html?id=721 Watch Academy VI: Hogswatchnight]]" features the must-have toy in Ankh-Morpork this Hogswatch, which is -- of course -- secretly part of a Sinister and Eldritch Plot. In the scenario as written they're quasi-intelligent furry things called [[Toys/{{Furby}} [[FauxFurby Burfies]], but the author recommends adapting them to whatever the Cool Toy is at the time the game is played.

Added DiffLines:

* SlidingScaleOfUndeadRegeneration: Rules and character features are provided to allow zombies and zombie-like beings to function as in the books — in terms of the trope definition, somewhere between Type I and Type II.

Added DiffLines:

* PerceptionFilter: The game calls the fairly common Discworld version of this effect ''Unnoticed''.

Added DiffLines:

* AdaptationalContextChange: The second edition reuses as much art from both volumes of the first edition as possible, but differences between the texts sometimes alter the context they appear in. For example, an illustration of a pointing figure enveloping a snail in magical energy originally appeared next to a sidebar about giving standard GURPS spells Discworldly wizard names, and appeared to illustrate the spell Mollusk Control (or The Laskallans' Complete and Authoritative Slug and Snail Manipulation Incantation). In the second edition, the same picture is used in the completely different magic system to represent the BalefulPolymorph spell Stacklady's Morphic Resonator.


[[caption-width-right:245:It's a game set in a world where ''[[Discworld/SoulMusic this]]'' happens. What more do you need to know?]]
The ''Discworld Role-Playing Game'' is a ''TabletopGame/{{GURPS}}'' sourcebook by Creator/PhilMasters based on the ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'' novels of Creator/TerryPratchett. It was originally published as ''GURPS Discworld'' in 1998 and repackaged as ''Discworld Role-Playing Game'' in 2002 to make it clearer you didn't ''have'' to have ''GURPS Basic Set'' in order to play, because the book included a copy of the minimal "GURPS Lite" rule set. A supplement, ''GURPS Discworld Also'', was published in 2001; this updated the background information up to ''Discworld/TheTruth'', included character templates, and gave four possible campaign settings not entirely taken from the novels -- the [[ArabianNightsDays Klatchian town of Al-Ybi]], the New Town of Smarlhanger on the Sto Plains, the {{pirate}} haunts of the [[HulaAndLuaus Brown Islands]], and the cart-warrior regions of [=EcksEcksEcksEcksian=] outback -- along with some scenarios, the longest of which were "Lost and Found" (about an expedition to the Disc's counterpart of DarkestAfrica) and "Sektoberfest in [=NoThingfjord=]" (which combines {{Oktoberfest}}, HornyVikings, and [[UsefulNotes/{{Australia}} Australian]] backpackers).

There were also a number of articles and scenarios for the game in ''Pyramid'' magazine, one of which -- [[http://www.sjgames.com/pyramid/sample.html?id=2177 "A Fist Full of Tunes You can Whistle"]] -- was originally published in the short-lived UK roleplaying magazine ''Visions'' as "A Fistful of Dwarfs". (This material was subsequently made freely available on Steve Jackson Games' Web site.) Then, at the end of 2016, [[http://www.sjgames.com/discworld/ a new edition of the sourcebook/game]] appeared, updating the setting information up to ''Discworld/{{Snuff}}'' and integrating a set of customised rules based on ''TabletopGame/{{GURPS}}'' 4th edition. This included revised and sometimes abbreviated versions of much of the setting and scenario material that first appeared in ''Discworld Also''.

to:

[[caption-width-right:245:It's a game set in a world where ''[[Discworld/SoulMusic ''[[Literature/SoulMusic this]]'' happens. What more do you need to know?]]
The ''Discworld Role-Playing Game'' is a ''TabletopGame/{{GURPS}}'' sourcebook by Creator/PhilMasters based on the ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'' novels of Creator/TerryPratchett. It was originally published as ''GURPS Discworld'' in 1998 and repackaged as ''Discworld Role-Playing Game'' in 2002 to make it clearer you didn't ''have'' to have ''GURPS Basic Set'' in order to play, because the book included a copy of the minimal "GURPS Lite" rule set. A supplement, ''GURPS Discworld Also'', was published in 2001; this updated the background information up to ''Discworld/TheTruth'', ''Literature/TheTruth'', included character templates, and gave four possible campaign settings not entirely taken from the novels -- the [[ArabianNightsDays Klatchian town of Al-Ybi]], the New Town of Smarlhanger on the Sto Plains, the {{pirate}} haunts of the [[HulaAndLuaus Brown Islands]], and the cart-warrior regions of [=EcksEcksEcksEcksian=] outback -- along with some scenarios, the longest of which were "Lost and Found" (about an expedition to the Disc's counterpart of DarkestAfrica) and "Sektoberfest in [=NoThingfjord=]" (which combines {{Oktoberfest}}, HornyVikings, and [[UsefulNotes/{{Australia}} Australian]] backpackers).

There were also a number of articles and scenarios for the game in ''Pyramid'' magazine, one of which -- [[http://www.sjgames.com/pyramid/sample.html?id=2177 "A Fist Full of Tunes You can Whistle"]] -- was originally published in the short-lived UK roleplaying magazine ''Visions'' as "A Fistful of Dwarfs". (This material was subsequently made freely available on Steve Jackson Games' Web site.) Then, at the end of 2016, [[http://www.sjgames.com/discworld/ a new edition of the sourcebook/game]] appeared, updating the setting information up to ''Discworld/{{Snuff}}'' ''Literature/{{Snuff}}'' and integrating a set of customised rules based on ''TabletopGame/{{GURPS}}'' 4th edition. This included revised and sometimes abbreviated versions of much of the setting and scenario material that first appeared in ''Discworld Also''.



* ArcWelding: In the first edition's version of the adventure seed "Plumbing the Depths", mapping the Ankh-Morpork sewers was the brainchild of a lone eccentric inventor with a plan for an ox-drawn railway. In the second edition, it's all tied into the Undertaking from ''Discworld/MakingMoney'' and subsequent A-M books.

to:

* ArcWelding: In the first edition's version of the adventure seed "Plumbing the Depths", mapping the Ankh-Morpork sewers was the brainchild of a lone eccentric inventor with a plan for an ox-drawn railway. In the second edition, it's all tied into the Undertaking from ''Discworld/MakingMoney'' ''Literature/MakingMoney'' and subsequent A-M books.



** In ''Also'' and the second edition, there's an extended riff on ''TabletopGame/CarWars'' based on the ''Film/MadMax'' parody section of ''Discworld/TheLastContinent''. The main Cart Wars arena is run by a woman called [[Film/MadMaxBeyondThunderdome Auntie Ante]] (because she takes the bets).

to:

** In ''Also'' and the second edition, there's an extended riff on ''TabletopGame/CarWars'' based on the ''Film/MadMax'' parody section of ''Discworld/TheLastContinent''.''Literature/TheLastContinent''. The main Cart Wars arena is run by a woman called [[Film/MadMaxBeyondThunderdome Auntie Ante]] (because she takes the bets).



* TheTimeOfMyths: The novels play with this trope, making the Discworld a fantasy world with its own Time of Myths in its distant past. The game not only picks that up, but also tends to treat the early, more SwordAndSorcery-style early novels as something of a Time of Myths from the point of view of the most recent novels (which fits with the implications of Discworld stories such as ''Discworld/TheLastHero'', after all). It even features a {{Parody}} of[=/=]ShoutOut to the classic Franchise/ConanTheBarbarian FramingDevice:

to:

* TheTimeOfMyths: The novels play with this trope, making the Discworld a fantasy world with its own Time of Myths in its distant past. The game not only picks that up, but also tends to treat the early, more SwordAndSorcery-style early novels as something of a Time of Myths from the point of view of the most recent novels (which fits with the implications of Discworld stories such as ''Discworld/TheLastHero'', ''Literature/TheLastHero'', after all). It even features a {{Parody}} of[=/=]ShoutOut to the classic Franchise/ConanTheBarbarian FramingDevice:


-->"A character who tries to cast himself as the [[FarmBoy Brave Peasant Lad]] Who [[GuileHero Outwits The Troll]] may find that he's actually one of the [[SacrificialLamb Twenty Poor Peasants Eaten By The Troll]] Before [[KnightErrant The Knight Comes Along]]. He might even end up as the [[TheTrickster Devious Little Human]] Squashed By [[BrainsEvilBrawnGood The Troll Hero]]. (Troll [[FairyTale fairy-stories]] [[ThudAndBlunder aren’t especially subtle]].)"

to:

-->"A character who tries to cast himself as the [[FarmBoy Brave Peasant Lad]] Who [[GuileHero Outwits The Troll]] may find that he's actually one of the [[SacrificialLamb Twenty Poor Peasants Eaten By The Troll]] Before [[KnightErrant The Knight Comes Along]]. He might even end up as the [[TheTrickster Devious Little Human]] Squashed By [[BrainsEvilBrawnGood The Troll Hero]]. (Troll [[FairyTale fairy-stories]] [[ThudAndBlunder aren’t especially subtle]].subtle.)"


-->"A character who tries to cast himself as the [[FarmBoy Brave Peasant Lad]] Who [[GuileHero Outwits The Troll]] may find that he's actually one of the [[SacrificialLamb Twenty Poor Peasants Eaten By The Troll]] Before [[KnightErrant The Knight Comes Along]]. He might even end up as the [[{{Trickster}} Devious Little Human]] Squashed By [[BrainsEvilBrawnGood The Troll Hero]]. (Troll [[FairyTale fairy-stories]] [[ThudAndBlunder aren’t especially subtle]].)"

to:

-->"A character who tries to cast himself as the [[FarmBoy Brave Peasant Lad]] Who [[GuileHero Outwits The Troll]] may find that he's actually one of the [[SacrificialLamb Twenty Poor Peasants Eaten By The Troll]] Before [[KnightErrant The Knight Comes Along]]. He might even end up as the [[{{Trickster}} [[TheTrickster Devious Little Human]] Squashed By [[BrainsEvilBrawnGood The Troll Hero]]. (Troll [[FairyTale fairy-stories]] [[ThudAndBlunder aren’t especially subtle]].)"

Added DiffLines:

* NotSoSafeHarbor: Port Duck in the Brown Islands is a joint Sto Plains/Agatean settlement, full of sailors who definitely aren't pirates. Confusing things, the parts the Agatean tourists see are also full of people who really ''aren't'' pirates but insist they ''are,'' giving the tourists all the excitement of drinking in a pirate tavern without actually being in any danger. It’s a parody of the historical Port Royal, in the Caribbean, with an added dose of modern-day Hong Kong (and maybe a dash of Disneyland).


* RoyalHarem: The Al-Ybi material plays with this trope. It’s an ArabianNightsDays setting, so the place’s palace naturally has a harem — but [[spoiler:the hidden truth is that the harem women are a smart, practical highly pragmatic bunch who are secretly running the city via their influence over the sultan and their contacts in the bazaar]].

to:

* RoyalHarem: The Al-Ybi material plays with this trope. It’s an ArabianNightsDays setting, so the place’s palace naturally has a harem — but [[spoiler:the hidden truth is that the harem women are a smart, practical practical, highly pragmatic bunch who are secretly running the city via their influence over the sultan and their contacts in the bazaar]].



** In ''Also'', there's an extended riff on ''TabletopGame/CarWars'' based on the ''Film/MadMax'' parody section of ''Discworld/TheLastContinent''. The main Cart Wars arena is run by a woman called [[Film/MadMaxBeyondThunderdome Auntie Ante]] (because she takes the bets).

to:

** In ''Also'', ''Also'' and the second edition, there's an extended riff on ''TabletopGame/CarWars'' based on the ''Film/MadMax'' parody section of ''Discworld/TheLastContinent''. The main Cart Wars arena is run by a woman called [[Film/MadMaxBeyondThunderdome Auntie Ante]] (because she takes the bets).



* StopWorshippingMe: This is apparently how the Disc's nature gods feel. They get plenty of ''belief'' from superstitious farmers; druids and shamans seem to ''want'' something from them.

to:

* StopWorshippingMe: This is apparently how the Disc's nature gods feel. They get plenty of ''belief'' from superstitious farmers; farmers without having to demand worship, while druids and shamans seem to ''want'' something from them.

Added DiffLines:

* RoyalHarem: The Al-Ybi material plays with this trope. It’s an ArabianNightsDays setting, so the place’s palace naturally has a harem — but [[spoiler:the hidden truth is that the harem women are a smart, practical highly pragmatic bunch who are secretly running the city via their influence over the sultan and their contacts in the bazaar]].

Added DiffLines:

* TapOnTheHead: As this idea crops up occasionally in the novels, there are game rules for it.

Added DiffLines:

* KnuckleCracking: A typically ''self-confident'' example from Archchancellor Ridcully in a piece of flavor text:
-->''“The theurgic shielding is failing, Archchancellor!” said Ponder, clutching at his hat. “We have a divine incursion!”''\\
''“Gods?” Ridcully roared, “Gods, in here?” Then he paused, and cracked his knuckles. “Right,” he said, “we'll see about that . . .”''


* SacredHospitality: As in the novels, the Klatchian and D’reg’s Codes of Honour are serious about hospitality: “If you take in a guest or ''are'' a guest, treat the hospitality as sacred for exactly 72 hours.” The Dark Lord’s Code puts a twisted spin on this: “Provide visiting heroes who aren't yet scheduled for the death-trap with comfortable lodgings, submissive servants, and a change of clothes.”

to:

* SacredHospitality: As in the novels, the Klatchian and D’reg’s Codes of Honour are serious about hospitality: “If you take in a guest or ''are'' a guest, treat the hospitality as sacred for exactly 72 hours.” The Conversely, the Dark Lord’s Code puts a twisted spin on this: this idea: “Provide visiting heroes who aren't yet scheduled for the death-trap with comfortable lodgings, submissive servants, and a change of clothes.”

Showing 15 edit(s) of 72

Top

How well does it match the trope?

Example of:

/

Media sources:

/

Report