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* ''Series/TheWall'': A pachinko-based quiz for NBC hosted by [[Series/AtMidnight Chris Hardwick]]; a player must choose where they want to drop one or more balls from on the board -- which land into slots with different dollar amounts -- based only on seeing the options for the next question. The question itself is answered by a partner in [[SoundProofBooth isolation]], with correct answers adding the money to their bank, and wrong answers deducting it (hence, where you play the balls depends on your confidence, as higher values are placed towards the right end of the board). The bank can fluctuate wildly between over $2,000,000 (the last round features a $1,000,000 space!), or down to nearly nothing (because your balls turned into a {{Whammy}} by landing into said space). Lifted from the aforementioned "Guardian Angel" on ''Set for Life'', the partner has to secretly choose between taking whatever the contestant won, or a ConsolationPrize buy-out based on the number of questions they answered correctly. Unlike ''Set for Life'', however, the partner is not given any information on their team's progress. As usual for an NBC game show, its loaded with padding and melodrama, ''especially'' during the aforementioned endgame; you could make a drinking game out of how many times the show and its promos mention things like "life-changing money". The set, while dark and glitzy, does admittedly have SceneryPorn in the form of the Wall itself.

to:

* ''Series/TheWall'': A pachinko-based quiz for NBC hosted by [[Series/AtMidnight Chris Hardwick]]; a player must choose where they want to drop one or more balls from on the board -- which land into slots with different dollar amounts -- based only on seeing the options for the next question. The question itself is answered by a partner in [[SoundProofBooth isolation]], with correct answers adding the money to their bank, and wrong answers deducting it (hence, where you play the balls depends on your confidence, as higher values are placed towards the right end of the board). The bank can fluctuate wildly between over $2,000,000 (the last round features a $1,000,000 space!), or down to nearly nothing (because your balls turned into a {{Whammy}} by landing into said space). Lifted However, in a mechanic partially lifted from the aforementioned "Guardian Angel" on ''Set for Life'', the partner has to secretly choose between taking whatever the contestant won, or a ConsolationPrize buy-out based on the number of questions they answered correctly. Unlike ''Set for Life'', however, the partner is not given any information on their team's progress. As usual for an NBC game show, its loaded with padding and melodrama, ''especially'' during the aforementioned endgame; you could make a drinking game out of how many times the show and its promos mention things like "life-changing money". The set, while dark and glitzy, does admittedly have SceneryPorn in the form of the Wall itself.itself.
* In 2019, Fox premiered another game show called ''Spin the Wheel''; its format seems to lift quite a bit of its mechanics from ''The Wall''.


* ''Series/TheWall'': A pachinko-based quiz for NBC hosted by [[Series/AtMidnight Chris Hardwick]]; a player in isolation must answer multiple-choice questions, and a player outside must choose where they want to drop one or more balls from on the board -- which land into slots with different dollar amounts -- based only on seeing the options for the next question. Correct answers add money to the team's bank, but wrong answers ''deduct''; hence, where you play the balls depends on your confidence in whether your partner can answer correctly (higher values are pushed towards the right of the board). The bank can fluctuate wildly between over $2,000,000 (the last round features a $1,000,000 space!), or down to nearly nothing because your balls turned into a {{Whammy}} (often by landing into said space). Plus, there is a mechanic similar to the aforementioned "Guardian Angel" on ''Set for Life'': the partner is not given any information on the team's progress, but has to choose between taking whatever the outside contestant won (which could easily be nothing in some cases) or a ConsolationPrize buy-out based on the number of questions they answered correctly. As usual for an NBC game show, its loaded with padding and melodrama, ''especially'' during the aforementioned endgame; you could make a drinking game out of how many times the show and its promos mention things like "life-changing money". The set, while dark and glitzy, does admittedly have SceneryPorn in the form of the Wall itself.

to:

* ''Series/TheWall'': A pachinko-based quiz for NBC hosted by [[Series/AtMidnight Chris Hardwick]]; a player in isolation must answer multiple-choice questions, and a player outside must choose where they want to drop one or more balls from on the board -- which land into slots with different dollar amounts -- based only on seeing the options for the next question. Correct The question itself is answered by a partner in [[SoundProofBooth isolation]], with correct answers add adding the money to the team's their bank, but and wrong answers ''deduct''; hence, deducting it (hence, where you play the balls depends on your confidence in whether your partner can answer correctly (higher confidence, as higher values are pushed placed towards the right end of the board). The bank can fluctuate wildly between over $2,000,000 (the last round features a $1,000,000 space!), or down to nearly nothing because (because your balls turned into a {{Whammy}} (often by landing into said space). Plus, there is a mechanic similar to Lifted from the aforementioned "Guardian Angel" on ''Set for Life'': Life'', the partner is not given any information on the team's progress, but has to secretly choose between taking whatever the outside contestant won (which could easily be nothing in some cases) won, or a ConsolationPrize buy-out based on the number of questions they answered correctly.correctly. Unlike ''Set for Life'', however, the partner is not given any information on their team's progress. As usual for an NBC game show, its loaded with padding and melodrama, ''especially'' during the aforementioned endgame; you could make a drinking game out of how many times the show and its promos mention things like "life-changing money". The set, while dark and glitzy, does admittedly have SceneryPorn in the form of the Wall itself.

Added DiffLines:

* ''Series/PressYourLuck'': The 2019 version features a bonus game which consists of six rounds and is played by a single contestant; the goal is to accumulate $500,000 or more without earning four Whammies. If the contestant achieves that goal, the winnings are augmented to $1,000,000.


* In 2002, ''Series/ThePriceIsRight'' started doing primetime ''Million Dollar Spectacular'' episodes as a follow-up to a run of military "Salute" specials that year, which offered a chance for contestants to win $1 million by hitting the dollar on a bonus spin in the Showcase Showdown (as opposed to the $11,000 prize normally given in daytime at the time). It was otherwise the daytime show in primetime, though on a redecorated set (with more lighting effects and a [[SceneryPorn giant, light-up "$1,000,000" sign at the back of the audience]]) and with a larger prize budget; it didn't magically turn into a ''Millionaire'' clone (until they dimmed the lights and played suspenseful music on the bonus spin, that is). A second run of ''MDS'' episodes was done with then-new host Drew Carey during the Writers Guild of America strike. While they have not been held again since, the daytime show has since done theme weeks featuring games played for large amounts of money or expensive automobiles (though in most cases, these prizes are assigned to games known for their difficulty, such as Plinko and 3 Strikes).
* ''Series/{{Pyramid}}'': The 2002-04 version (often referred to as ''Donnymid'', after host Donny Osmond) felt like Sony was trying to replicate ''Millionaire'' and fuse it with classic ''Pyramid'' (strict judging, purple and black color scheme, dark metallic set, and loud techno theme), just [[NoBudget minus a budget]]. Not helping was that one of the 2000 Osmond pilots was in fact ''The $1,000,000 Pyramid'' (for a run on NBC that didn't happen). Pretty much averted by the 2009 ''$1,000,000'' pilots, which were an updated rendition of the 70s/80s ''Pyramid'' with a tournament structure for the $1,000,000 like the 80s/90s ''$100,000'' runs. The current ''$100,000 Pyramid'' on ABC is more faithful to the classic ''$25,000'' format, except with the payouts upped to $50,000 and $100,000.

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* In 2002, ''Series/ThePriceIsRight'' started doing primetime ''Million Dollar Spectacular'' episodes as a follow-up to a run of military "Salute" specials that year, which offered a chance for contestants to win $1 a million dollars by hitting the dollar on a bonus spin in the Showcase Showdown (as opposed to the $11,000 prize normally given in daytime at the time). It was otherwise Besides this, a noticeably higher prize budget for the daytime show in primetime, though on pricing games and Showcases, and a redecorated set (with ([[SceneryPorn with more lighting effects and a [[SceneryPorn giant, light-up "$1,000,000" sign at the back of the audience]]) audience]]), it was otherwise business as usual and with a larger prize budget; it didn't magically turn into a ''Millionaire'' clone (until they dimmed the lights and played suspenseful music on the bonus spin, that is). A second run of ''MDS'' episodes was done with then-new host Drew Carey during the Writers Guild of America strike. While they have not been held again since, the daytime show has since done theme weeks featuring games played for large amounts of money or expensive automobiles (though in most cases, these prizes are assigned to games known for their difficulty, such as Plinko and 3 Strikes).
* ''Series/{{Pyramid}}'': The 2002-04 version (often referred to as ''Donnymid'', after host Donny Osmond) felt like Sony was trying to replicate ''Millionaire'' and fuse it with classic ''Pyramid'' (strict judging, purple and black color scheme, dark metallic set, and loud techno theme), just [[NoBudget minus a budget]]. Not helping was that one of the 2000 Osmond pilots was in fact ''The $1,000,000 Pyramid'' (for a run on NBC that didn't happen). Pretty much averted by the 2009 ''$1,000,000'' pilots, which were an updated rendition of the 70s/80s ''Pyramid'' with a tournament structure for the $1,000,000 like the 80s/90s ''$100,000'' runs. The current ''$100,000 Pyramid'' on ABC is more faithful to an updated rendition of the classic ''$25,000'' format, except with the payouts upped to $50,000 and $100,000.


* ''Series/TheOneMillionChanceOfALifetime'' both subverted it (as it was aired in the 1986-87 season) ''and'' played it straight; you had the dramatic fanfares, the massive confetti drops, the family in the audience. But there weren't any Lifelines, and no money ladder; rather, champions had to be on for three days and play the bonus round on their third day to get the million- which wasn't even a lump sum but rather an annuity and, for the second season, an annuity worth $900,000 in total plus $100,000 in various prizes, including two cars. Indeed, it was more of a normal game show which just happened to have a really big set and top prize (apparently it started as a 1979 pilot called ''The Letter Machine'', while the British version dumped the big money gimmick into a rubbish bin and called it ''All Clued Up'').

to:

* ''Series/TheOneMillionChanceOfALifetime'' both subverted it (as it was aired in the 1986-87 season) ''and'' played it straight; you had the dramatic fanfares, the massive confetti drops, the family in the audience. But there weren't any Lifelines, and no money ladder; rather, champions had to be on for three days and play the bonus round on their third day to get the million- which wasn't even a lump sum but rather an annuity and, for the second season, an annuity worth $900,000 in total plus $100,000 in various prizes, including two cars. Indeed, it was more of a normal game show which just happened to have a really big set and top prize (apparently it started as a 1979 pilot called ''The Letter Machine'', while the Machine''. The British version dumped the big money gimmick into a rubbish bin and called it version, ''All Clued Up'').Up'', similarly went in a low-stakes direction).


** Stempel attempted to expose the fraud, but it wasn't until a SmokingGun exposing internal coaching on another quiz show, ''Series/{{Dotto}}'', that he was taken seriously. The scandal was a GenreKiller for the big-money game show, with networks preferring more low-stakes games and more control over productions; it took until the 1970's for shows such as ''[[Series/{{Pyramid}} The $10,000 Pyramid]]'' to break the five-figure barrier again, while the 1986 ''Series/TheOneMillionChanceOfALifetime'' was the first to break the seven-figure barrier as an annuity (but as mentioned, besides the bonus round, it was otherwise a typical game show of the era). In the 1990's, an Creator/{{ABC}} executive was actively considering reviving ''Question'', until he caught wind of ''Who Wants To Be a Millionaire?'', and decided to pursue a U.S. version of that instead. CBS filmed a pilot for a revival in 2000 to capitalize on ''Millionaire'' (with a top prize of $1,028,000), but it didn't make it to air (and as mentioned, the network ultimately decided to order a big-money version of another show from the studio behind ''Millionaire'').

to:

** Stempel attempted to expose the fraud, but it wasn't until a SmokingGun exposing internal coaching on another quiz show, ''Series/{{Dotto}}'', that he was taken seriously. The scandal was a GenreKiller for the big-money game show, with networks preferring more low-stakes games and more control over productions; it took until the 1970's for shows such as ''[[Series/{{Pyramid}} The $10,000 Pyramid]]'' to break the five-figure barrier again, while the 1986 ''Series/TheOneMillionChanceOfALifetime'' was the first to break the seven-figure barrier as an annuity (but as mentioned, besides the bonus round, it was otherwise a typical game show of the era). In the 1990's, an Creator/{{ABC}} executive was actively considering reviving ''Question'', until he caught wind of ''Who Wants To Be a Millionaire?'', and decided to pursue a U.S. version of that instead. CBS filmed a pilot for a revival in 2000 to capitalize on ''Millionaire'' (with a top prize of $1,028,000), but it didn't make it to air (and as mentioned, the network ultimately decided to order a big-money version of ''Series/WinningLines'' -- another show from the studio behind producers of ''Millionaire'').


* ''Series/TheAmandaShow'' parodied ''Millionaire'' with ''So You Wanna Win Five Dollars?'', where the host would grow increasingly infuriated with the contestants' antics.

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* ''Series/TheAmandaShow'' parodied ''Millionaire'' with ''So You Wanna Win Five Dollars?'', Dollars'', where the host would grow increasingly infuriated with the contestants' antics.


* ''Series/TheAmandaShow'' parodied the original with ''So You Wanna Win Five Dollars'', where the host would grow increasingly infuriated with the contestants' antics.

to:

* ''Series/TheAmandaShow'' parodied the original ''Millionaire'' with ''So You Wanna Win Five Dollars'', Dollars?'', where the host would grow increasingly infuriated with the contestants' antics.


* ''Series/WinBenSteinsMoney'': One episode lampooned the ''Millionaire'' motif with dramatic (and increasingly unnecessary) music and silly lifelines, though the episode's top prize didn't exceed ''WBSM''[='=]s standard $5,000 pot.
-->'''Jimmy Kimmel:''' If you are too stupid to answer the questions in this round, we've got three ways to help you cheat. Number one, you can dial 1-900-ASS-PARTY; they may not have the answers, but it is a lot of fun. Number two, you can poll our audience, but they're really only good if it's a drug question. And, number three, you can ask me, but that's not usually much help either.




----
!!Some notable parodies of ''Milliomaire''[='s=] tropes include




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* ''Series/WinBenSteinsMoney'' lampooned the ''Millionaire'' motif in one episode with dramatic (and increasingly unnecessary) music and silly lifelines, though the episode's top prize didn't exceed ''WBSM''[='=]s standard $5,000 pot.
-->'''[[Series/JimmyKimmelLive Jimmy Kimmel]]:''' If you are too stupid to answer the questions in this round, we've got three ways to help you cheat. Number one, you can dial 1-900-ASS-PARTY; they may not have the answers, but it is a lot of fun. Number two, you can poll our audience, but they're really only good if it's a drug question. And, number three, you can ask me, but that's not usually much help either.
* The short-lived game show based on the comedic quiz video game franchise ''VideoGame/YouDontKnowJack'' ([[BitingTheHandHumor which aired on ABC, no less]]) lampooned ''Millionaire'' with a "$2,000,000 Question" round. That is, the value of the question would start at $2 million and drained away over time until someone answered it. However, no one got the memo that maybe the clock shouldn't start until the host ''finishes'' reading the question -- so they proceeded to [[{{Padding}} deliberately pad out as much as possible with various gags and distractions to the host]]. By the time the host actually finished reading the question, it was only worth around $200 ''or less''.



to:

* ''Series/TheAmandaShow'' parodied the original with ''So You Wanna Win Five Dollars'', where the host would grow increasingly infuriated with the contestants' antics.


In 1999, things were looking bleak for the American GameShow genre. There were no prime-time network game shows, and the only shows around on the networks and syndication were holdovers from the 1970s and 1980s ''Series/ThePriceIsRight'', Whoopi Goldberg's ''Series/TheHollywoodSquares'' revival, the latest (and lamest) ''Series/MatchGame'' revival, and evergreens ''Series/WheelOfFortune'' and ''Series/{{Jeopardy}}''. Cable games weren't faring much better -- most of the networks had either cancelled them (Creator/{{Lifetime}}, [[Creator/{{Freeform}} Fox Family]]), were shying away from game shows (Creator/{{Nickelodeon}}), or had completely rid themselves of them (Creator/USANetwork). Even Creator/{{GSN}} was at a low point, with several originals being either cancelled or not very good at all, and having just come out of their "Dark Period" where they lost the rights to almost every [[Creator/MarkGoodson Goodson-Todman]] show.

to:

In 1999, things were looking bleak for the American GameShow genre. There were no prime-time network game shows, and the only shows around on the networks and syndication were holdovers from the 1970s and 1980s ''Series/ThePriceIsRight'', Whoopi Goldberg's ''Series/TheHollywoodSquares'' revival, the latest new (and lamest) ''Series/MatchGame'' revival, and evergreens ''Series/WheelOfFortune'' and ''Series/{{Jeopardy}}''. Cable games weren't faring much better -- most of the networks had either cancelled them (Creator/{{Lifetime}}, [[Creator/{{Freeform}} Fox Family]]), were shying away from game shows (Creator/{{Nickelodeon}}), or had completely rid themselves of them (Creator/USANetwork). Even Creator/{{GSN}} was at a low point, with several originals being either cancelled or not very good at all, and having just come out of their "Dark Period" where they lost the rights to almost every [[Creator/MarkGoodson Goodson-Todman]] show.


** There was one other feature that ''Question'' and several other game shows of the era shared: dishonesty. At the time, sponsors held a [[ExecutiveMeddling high degree of influence over the production of television programs]], and it was in their best interests to keep viewer interest (and in turn, ratings) high. It was common for shows to play up contestants with personalities and stories that would be memorable to the audience, so that viewers would be encouraged to continue following their journey every week. Revlon CEO Charles Revson frequently meddled against contestants he didn't like, such as Joyce Brothers -- who was forced into having boxing be her category. However, she beat the producers at their own game by studying the subject extensively, and became the only woman to win the $64,000 grand prize.

to:

** There was one other feature that ''Question'' and several other game shows of the era shared: dishonesty. At the time, sponsors held a [[ExecutiveMeddling high degree of influence over the production of television programs]], and it was in their best interests to keep viewer interest (and in turn, ratings) high. It was common for shows to play up contestants with personalities and stories that would be memorable to the audience, so that viewers would be encouraged to continue following their journey every week. Revlon CEO Charles Revson frequently meddled against contestants he didn't like, such as Joyce Brothers -- who was forced into having boxing be her category. However, she beat the producers at their own game by studying the subject extensively, and became the only woman to win the $64,000 grand prize. Oh, and that IBM sorting machine? It was just a prop.


** Stempel attempted to expose the fraud, but it wasn't until a SmokingGun exposing internal coaching on another quiz show, ''Series/{{Dotto}}'', that he was taken seriously. The scandal was a GenreKiller for the big-money game show, with networks preferring more low-stakes games and more control over productions; it took until the 1970's for shows such as ''[[Series/{{Pyramid}} The $10,000 Pyramid]]'' to break the five-figure barrier again, while the 1986 ''Series/TheOneMillionChanceOfALifetime'' was the first to break the seven-figure barrier as an annuity (but as mentioned, besides the bonus round, it was otherwise a typical game show of the era). In the 1990's, an Creator/{{ABC}} executive was actively considering reviving ''Question'', until he caught wind of ''Millionaire'' and decided to pursue that instead. CBS filmed a pilot for a revival in 2000 to capitalize on ''Millionaire'' (with a top prize of $1,028,000), but it didn't make it to air.

to:

** Stempel attempted to expose the fraud, but it wasn't until a SmokingGun exposing internal coaching on another quiz show, ''Series/{{Dotto}}'', that he was taken seriously. The scandal was a GenreKiller for the big-money game show, with networks preferring more low-stakes games and more control over productions; it took until the 1970's for shows such as ''[[Series/{{Pyramid}} The $10,000 Pyramid]]'' to break the five-figure barrier again, while the 1986 ''Series/TheOneMillionChanceOfALifetime'' was the first to break the seven-figure barrier as an annuity (but as mentioned, besides the bonus round, it was otherwise a typical game show of the era). In the 1990's, an Creator/{{ABC}} executive was actively considering reviving ''Question'', until he caught wind of ''Millionaire'' ''Who Wants To Be a Millionaire?'', and decided to pursue a U.S. version of that instead. CBS filmed a pilot for a revival in 2000 to capitalize on ''Millionaire'' (with a top prize of $1,028,000), but it didn't make it to air.
air (and as mentioned, the network ultimately decided to order a big-money version of another show from the studio behind ''Millionaire'').


** There was one other feature that ''Question'' and several other game shows of the era shared: dishonesty. At the time, sponsors held a [[ExecutiveMeddling high degree of influence over the production of television programs]], and it was in their best interests to keep viewer interest (and in turn, ratings) high. It was common for shows to play up contestants with personalities and stories that would be memorable to the audience, so that viewers would be encouraged to continue following their journey every week; the chief executive of Revlon frequently meddled against contestants he didn't like (such as Joyce Brothers -- who was forced into having boxing be her category, but beat the producers at their own game by studying enough about boxing to become the only woman to actually win the grand prize).

to:

** There was one other feature that ''Question'' and several other game shows of the era shared: dishonesty. At the time, sponsors held a [[ExecutiveMeddling high degree of influence over the production of television programs]], and it was in their best interests to keep viewer interest (and in turn, ratings) high. It was common for shows to play up contestants with personalities and stories that would be memorable to the audience, so that viewers would be encouraged to continue following their journey every week; the chief executive of week. Revlon CEO Charles Revson frequently meddled against contestants he didn't like (such like, such as Joyce Brothers -- who was forced into having boxing be her category, but category. However, she beat the producers at their own game by studying enough about boxing to become the subject extensively, and became the only woman to actually win the $64,000 grand prize).prize.


** There was one other feature that ''Question'' and several other game shows of the era shared: dishonesty. At the time, sponsors held a [[ExecutiveMeddling high degree of influence over the production of television programs]], and it was in their best interests to keep viewer interest (and in turn, ratings) high. It was common for shows to play up contestants with personalities and stories that would be memorable to the audience, so that viewers would be encouraged to continue following their journey every week; the chief executive of Revlon frequently meddled against contestants he didn't like (such as Joyce Brothers -- who was forced into being asked questions about ''boxing'', but wound up subverting expectations by becoming the only woman to actually make it to the end).

to:

** There was one other feature that ''Question'' and several other game shows of the era shared: dishonesty. At the time, sponsors held a [[ExecutiveMeddling high degree of influence over the production of television programs]], and it was in their best interests to keep viewer interest (and in turn, ratings) high. It was common for shows to play up contestants with personalities and stories that would be memorable to the audience, so that viewers would be encouraged to continue following their journey every week; the chief executive of Revlon frequently meddled against contestants he didn't like (such as Joyce Brothers -- who was forced into being asked questions having boxing be her category, but beat the producers at their own game by studying enough about ''boxing'', but wound up subverting expectations by becoming boxing to become the only woman to actually make it to win the end).grand prize).

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