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* Apparently during the Battle for France when everyone but a few German tank commanders expected a replay of 1914-1918 in some form Hitler gave many orders to halt the damn reckless advance, dammit, only for the tank commanders to largely ignore them. Given that this led to the capture of Paris and the surrender of the French high command within ''weeks'', nobody was in any mood to punish anyone for their reckless attacks.


* In Creator/MercedesLackey works "It's easier to ask forgiveness than to get permission" is practically a motto. And while her younger characters sometimes ''do'' have to grovel a bit afterward, they're just as likely to be applauded for showing agency and acting like adults.
** In ''Literature/TheLastHeraldMageTrilogy'', the heir and his love interest get married. Half the cast is appalled -- it means AltarDiplomacy is off the table, for one -- but several wiser characters praise them for acting for themselves instead of being steered around.
** In the [[Literature/HeraldsOfValdemar Mage Storms trilogy]], several lower-deck characters quietly open communications with Grand Duke Tremane, who has taken possession of a neighboring country, in the interest of forming a multinational alliance to deal with the Mage Storms. Karsite priest Karal takes the worst of the backlash -- Tremane ordered the assassination of his mentor and one of High Priest Solaris's closest associates -- but Solaris ultimately backs off when she realizes he was right.

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* In Creator/MercedesLackey works "It's easier to ask forgiveness than to get permission" is practically a motto. And while her younger characters sometimes ''do'' have to grovel a bit afterward, they're just as likely to be applauded for showing agency and acting like adults.
** In ''Literature/TheLastHeraldMageTrilogy'', the ''Literature/LastHeraldMageTrilogy'', the heir and his love interest get married. Half the cast is appalled -- it means AltarDiplomacy is now off the table, for one -- but several wiser characters praise them for acting for themselves instead of being steered around.
** In the [[Literature/HeraldsOfValdemar Mage Storms trilogy]], several lower-deck characters quietly open communications with Grand Duke Tremane, who has taken possession of a neighboring country, in the interest of forming a multinational alliance to deal with the Mage Storms. Karsite priest Karal takes the worst of the backlash -- Tremane ordered the assassination of his mentor and one of High Priest Solaris's closest associates -- but Solaris ultimately backs off when she realizes he was right.


* In Creator/MercedesLackey works "It's easier to ask forgiveness than to get permission" is practically a motto. And while her younger characters sometimes ''do'' have to grovel a bit afterward, they're just as likely to be applauded for showing agency and acting like adults.
** In ''Literature/TheLastHeraldMage'', the heir and his love interest get married. Half the cast is appalled -- it means AltarDiplomacy is off the table, for one -- but several wiser characters praise them for acting for themselves instead of being steered around.
** In the [[Literature/HeraldsOfValdemar Mage Storms trilogy]], several lower-deck characters quietly open communications with Grand Duke Tremane, who has taken possession of a neighboring country, in the interest of forming a multinational alliance to deal with the Mage Storms. Karsite priest Karal takes the worst of the backlash -- Tremane ordered the assassination of his mentor and one of High Priest Solaris's closest associates -- but Solaris ultimately backs off when she realizes he was right.

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* In Creator/MercedesLackey works "It's easier to ask forgiveness than to get permission" is practically a motto. And while her younger characters sometimes ''do'' have to grovel a bit afterward, they're just as likely to be applauded for showing agency and acting like adults.
** In ''Literature/TheLastHeraldMage'', ''Literature/TheLastHeraldMageTrilogy'', the heir and his love interest get married. Half the cast is appalled -- it means AltarDiplomacy is off the table, for one -- but several wiser characters praise them for acting for themselves instead of being steered around.
** In the [[Literature/HeraldsOfValdemar Mage Storms trilogy]], several lower-deck characters quietly open communications with Grand Duke Tremane, who has taken possession of a neighboring country, in the interest of forming a multinational alliance to deal with the Mage Storms. Karsite priest Karal takes the worst of the backlash -- Tremane ordered the assassination of his mentor and one of High Priest Solaris's closest associates -- but Solaris ultimately backs off when she realizes he was right.


* In Creator/MercedesLackey works "It's easier to ask forgiveness than to get permission" is practically a motto. And while her younger characters sometimes ''do'' have to grovel a bit afterward, they're just as likely to be applauded for showing agency and acting like adults.
** In ''Literature/TheLastHeraldMage'', the heir and his love interest get married. Half the cast is appalled -- it means AltarDiplomacy is off the table, for one -- but several wiser characters praise them for acting for themselves instead of being steered around.
** In the [[Literature/HeraldsOfValdemar Mage Storms trilogy]], several lower-deck characters quietly open communications with Grand Duke Tremane, who has taken possession of a neighboring country, in the interest of forming a multinational alliance to deal with the Mage Storms. Karsite priest Karal takes the worst of the backlash -- Tremane ordered the assassination of his mentor and one of High Priest Solaris's closest associates -- but Solaris ultimately backs off when she realizes he was right.



* In Creator/MercedesLackey works "It's easier to ask forgiveness than to get permission" is practically a motto. And while her younger characters sometimes ''do'' have to grovel a bit afterward, they're just as likely to be applauded for showing agency and acting like adults.

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* In Creator/MercedesLackey works "It's easier to ask forgiveness than to get permission" is practically a motto. And while her younger characters sometimes ''do'' have to grovel a bit afterward, they're just as likely to be applauded for showing agency and acting like adults.


** Harry Dresden is able to get away with some BlackMagic in ''Literature/DeadBeat'' through a combination of LoopholeAbuse, [[IDidWhatIHadToDo necessity]], and the fact that [[spoiler:reanimating a ''TyrannosaurusRex'']] was so unspeakably ''awesome'' that even some of the Wardens were impressed.

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** Harry Dresden is able to get away with some BlackMagic in ''Literature/DeadBeat'' through a combination of LoopholeAbuse, [[IDidWhatIHadToDo necessity]], and the fact that [[spoiler:reanimating a ''TyrannosaurusRex'']] ''UsefulNotes/TyrannosaurusRex'']] was so unspeakably ''awesome'' that even some of the Wardens were impressed.


* Admiral Yi Sun-sin was a Korean admiral during Korea's Joseon Dynasty. He was known for his ingenuity, including building an armored ship affectionately dubbed the "Turtle Ship" due to its shape. When it looked as though Japan was gearing up for an invasion, he was told to remain on land as the army got ready. He went ahead and ignored his orders and sent his much smaller fleet out to beat Japan. This was considered an act of treason and he was actually scheduled to be executed but the King was impressed (y'know, with him halting an entire invasion and all), so he kept him alive and in command of Korea's navy. Admiral Yi went on to kick the crap out of Japan's invading forces about thirty more times, [[CurbStompBattle/RealLife never losing a ship]].

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* [[TheStrategist Admiral Yi Sun-sin Sun-sin]] was a Korean admiral during Korea's Joseon Dynasty. He was known for his ingenuity, including building an armored ship affectionately dubbed the "Turtle Ship" due to its shape. When it looked as though Japan was gearing up for an invasion, he was told to remain on land as the army got ready. He went ahead and ignored his orders and sent his much smaller fleet out to beat Japan. This was considered an act of treason and he was actually scheduled to be executed but the King was impressed (y'know, with him halting an entire invasion and all), so he kept him alive and in command of Korea's navy. Admiral Yi went on to kick the crap out of Japan's invading forces about thirty more times, [[CurbStompBattle/RealLife never losing a ship]].


* Lee Soon-Shin was a Korean admiral during Korea's Joseon Dynasty. He was known for his ingenuity, including building an armored ship affectionately termed the "Turtle Ship" due to its shape. When it looked as though Japan was gearing up for an invasion, he was told to remain on land as the army got ready. He went ahead and ignored his orders and sent his much smaller fleet out to beat Japan. This was considered an act of treason and he was actually scheduled to be executed but the King was impressed (y'know, with him halting an entire invasion and all), so he kept him alive and in command of Korea's navy. Admiral Lee went on to kick the crap out of Japan's invading forces about thirty more times.

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* Lee Soon-Shin Admiral Yi Sun-sin was a Korean admiral during Korea's Joseon Dynasty. He was known for his ingenuity, including building an armored ship affectionately termed dubbed the "Turtle Ship" due to its shape. When it looked as though Japan was gearing up for an invasion, he was told to remain on land as the army got ready. He went ahead and ignored his orders and sent his much smaller fleet out to beat Japan. This was considered an act of treason and he was actually scheduled to be executed but the King was impressed (y'know, with him halting an entire invasion and all), so he kept him alive and in command of Korea's navy. Admiral Lee Yi went on to kick the crap out of Japan's invading forces about thirty more times.times, [[CurbStompBattle/RealLife never losing a ship]].


->''"An airbender '''never''' attacks a defenseless opponent. ''[beat]'' But that was very good technique."''

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->''"An airbender '''never''' attacks a defenseless opponent. ''[beat]'' ''[{{beat}}]'' But that was very good technique."''



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* In ''AudioPlay/StrikersSoundStageX'', Teana is nearly put on trial for [[spoiler:unwittingly collaborating with the terrorist mastermind]] but is let off with a warning thanks to her efforts in containing the damage caused by the incident.

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* In ''AudioPlay/StrikersSoundStageX'', Teana is nearly put on trial for [[spoiler:unwittingly collaborating with the terrorist mastermind]] mastermind]], but is let off with a warning thanks to her efforts in containing the damage caused by the incident.



** The granddaddy of these must be Captain James T. Kirk. As recounted in ''Film/StarTrekIITheWrathOfKhan'', he put this trope into action when he cheated on an Academy test, and rather than be kicked out, he was given a ''commendation''. For original thinking. It helped that the Academy test he 'cheated' on was an UnwinnableTrainingSimulation designed specifically to find out what a cadet does when faced with a scenario where all their choices are bad ones; Kirk's response to a no-win scenario was to improvise, think out of the box and use a few dirty tricks so he could TakeAThirdOption, which is exactly the kind of qualities Starfleet want in their officers.
** ''Film/StarTrek2009'' takes it farther, but first subverts it. Kirk is actually about to be kicked out for cheating on the test. But somehow he ends up on the Enterprise and tops his cheating with actually attempting a mutiny against Spock and disobeying the acting Captain's orders. Being that it was his disregard of orders that led to the defeat of the BigBad and the saving of (almost) every planet in the Federation, one can begin to see how he actually skips all the way to the Captain's chair at the end.

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** The granddaddy of these must be Captain James T. Kirk. As recounted in ''Film/StarTrekIITheWrathOfKhan'', he put this trope into action when he cheated on an Academy test, and rather than be kicked out, he was given a ''commendation''. For original thinking. It helped that the Academy test he 'cheated' on was an UnwinnableTrainingSimulation designed specifically to find out what a cadet does when faced with a scenario where all their choices are bad ones; Kirk's response to a no-win scenario was to improvise, think out outside of the box box, and use a few dirty tricks so he could TakeAThirdOption, which is exactly the kind of qualities Starfleet want wants in their officers.
** ''Film/StarTrek2009'' takes it farther, but first subverts it. Kirk is actually about to be kicked out for cheating on the test. But somehow he ends up on the Enterprise ''Enterprise'' and tops his cheating with actually attempting a mutiny against Spock and disobeying the acting Captain's orders. Being that it was his disregard of orders that led to the defeat of the BigBad and the saving of (almost) every planet in the Federation, one can begin to see how he actually skips all the way to the Captain's chair at the end.



* ''Literature/VorkosiganSaga'': Miles Vorkosigan manages this often in his career in [=ImpSec=]. Miles has a...problem with following orders, and those above constantly complain about his "excessive initiative" or curse him by wishing he one day commands someone "just like him". This trope is probably most notable in ''Literature/TheVorGame''. Miles is sent to a deadend position for just 6 months to prove he can follow orders, he comes home in 3 months [[spoiler:with a charge of treason]] but is forgiven because his refusal to keep his head down managed to [[spoiler:prevent a crazy near-homicidal commanding officer from allowing a group of techs that refused to obey his orders (to pointlessly risk themselves cleaning up a toxic spill) from freezing to death]]. He is put under the one man who could possible deal with him and sent on a simple intelligence gathering mission, by the end of which he manages to have 3 separate 'superior officers' locked in the brig so he can go about [[spoiler:leading a mercenary troop to defend a wormhole from an enemy invasion]] which no one ever asked him to do. But since he did manage to save everyone he ends up with a promotion and his dream job of [[spoiler:playing admiral for said military fleet]].

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* ''Literature/VorkosiganSaga'': Miles Vorkosigan manages this often in his career in [=ImpSec=]. Miles has a...problem with following orders, and those above constantly complain about his "excessive initiative" or curse him by wishing he one day commands someone "just like him". This trope is probably most notable in ''Literature/TheVorGame''. Miles is sent to a deadend dead-end position for just 6 months to prove he can follow orders, he comes home in 3 months [[spoiler:with a charge of treason]] but is forgiven because his refusal to keep his head down managed to [[spoiler:prevent a crazy near-homicidal commanding officer from allowing a group of techs that refused to obey his orders (to pointlessly risk themselves cleaning up a toxic spill) from freezing to death]]. He is put under the one man who could possible deal with him and sent on a simple intelligence gathering mission, by the end of which he manages to have 3 separate 'superior officers' locked in the brig so he can go about [[spoiler:leading a mercenary troop to defend a wormhole from an enemy invasion]] which no one ever asked him to do. But since he did manage to save everyone he ends up with a promotion and his dream job of [[spoiler:playing admiral for said military fleet]].



** ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'' - ''The Die is Cast'': "If you pull a stunt like that again, I'll courtmartial you. Or I'll promote you."

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** ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'' - ''The "The Die is Cast'': Cast:" "If you pull a stunt like that again, I'll courtmartial court martial you. Or I'll promote you."



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* In ''Audioplay/StrikersSoundStageX'', Teana is nearly put on trial for [[spoiler:unwittingly collaborating with the terrorist mastermind]] but is let off with a warning thanks to her efforts in containing the damage caused by the incident.

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* In ''Audioplay/StrikersSoundStageX'', ''AudioPlay/StrikersSoundStageX'', Teana is nearly put on trial for [[spoiler:unwittingly collaborating with the terrorist mastermind]] but is let off with a warning thanks to her efforts in containing the damage caused by the incident.



* Disney's ''Disney/{{Mulan}}''.

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* Disney's ''Disney/{{Mulan}}''.''WesternAnimation/{{Mulan}}''.

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** Gets a [[LampshadeHanging lampshade]] hung on it in ''Film/StarTrekVITheUndiscoveredCountry'' after the ''Enterprise'' crew break a whole bunch of rules and even commit outright mutiny against Starfleet, but in the process save both the Federation President ''and'' the Chancellor of the Klingon Empire from assassination during a peace conference.
--->'''Kirk:''' Once again, we've saved civilization as we know it.
--->'''[=McCoy=]''' And the good news is they're not going to prosecute.


--> '''7''': If you follow orders and fail, the Evil Overlord will claim he told you to do something different, and your body parts will be used a castle decorations. If you disobey orders and succeed, the EO will act as if what you did was his idea, and you will be commended. The Moral: Do what works.

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--> '''7''': If you follow orders and fail, the Evil Overlord will claim he told you to do something different, and your body parts will be used a as castle decorations. If you disobey orders and succeed, the EO will act as if what you did was his idea, and you will be commended. The Moral: Do what works.


->''...."The council calls Captain James Tiberius Kirk....."''\\
'''The audience''': '''WHHAAATTT??!!!'''
-->-- Audience reaction to the AwesomeMomentOfCrowning scene from ''Film/StarTrek2009''.

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->''...."The council calls Captain James Tiberius Kirk....."''\\
'''The audience''': '''WHHAAATTT??!!!'''
->''"An airbender '''never''' attacks a defenseless opponent. ''[beat]'' But that was very good technique."''
-->-- Audience reaction '''Tenzin''', ''WesternAnimation/TheLegendOfKorra''

%%Quote changed per [[https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/posts.php?discussion=1327331003042025100&page=238#comment-5950 this]] thread. If you want to change the quote, take it
to the AwesomeMomentOfCrowning scene from ''Film/StarTrek2009''.
thread.


** The granddaddy of these must be Captain James T. Kirk. As recounted in ''Film/StarTrekIITheWrathOfKhan'', he put this trope into action when he cheated on an Academy test, and rather than be kicked out, he was given a ''commendation''. For original thinking. It helped that the Academy test he 'cheated' on was an UnwinnableTrainingScenario designed specifically to find out what a cadet does when faced with a scenario where all their choices are bad ones; Kirk's response to a no-win scenario was to improvise, think out of the box and use a few dirty tricks so he could TakeAThirdOption, which is exactly the kind of qualities Starfleet want in their officers.

to:

** The granddaddy of these must be Captain James T. Kirk. As recounted in ''Film/StarTrekIITheWrathOfKhan'', he put this trope into action when he cheated on an Academy test, and rather than be kicked out, he was given a ''commendation''. For original thinking. It helped that the Academy test he 'cheated' on was an UnwinnableTrainingScenario UnwinnableTrainingSimulation designed specifically to find out what a cadet does when faced with a scenario where all their choices are bad ones; Kirk's response to a no-win scenario was to improvise, think out of the box and use a few dirty tricks so he could TakeAThirdOption, which is exactly the kind of qualities Starfleet want in their officers.


[[folder:Animated Films]]
* Disney's ''Disney/{{Mulan}}''.
--> '''The Emperor of China''': I've heard a great deal about you, Fa Mulan. You stole your father's armor, ran away from home, impersonated a soldier, deceived your commanding officer, dishonored the Chinese Army, ''destroyed my palace,'' and... [[ArsonMurderAndLifeSaving you have saved us all]].

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[[folder:Animated Films]]
[[folder:Audio Plays]]
* Disney's ''Disney/{{Mulan}}''.
--> '''The Emperor of China''': I've heard a great deal about you, Fa Mulan. You stole your father's armor, ran away from home, impersonated a soldier, deceived your commanding officer, dishonored
In ''Audioplay/StrikersSoundStageX'', Teana is nearly put on trial for [[spoiler:unwittingly collaborating with the Chinese Army, ''destroyed my palace,'' and... [[ArsonMurderAndLifeSaving you have saved us all]].terrorist mastermind]] but is let off with a warning thanks to her efforts in containing the damage caused by the incident.



[[folder:Anime and Manga]]
* In ''Audioplay/StrikersSoundStageX'', Teana is nearly put on trial for [[spoiler:unwittingly collaborating with the terrorist mastermind]] but is let off with a warning thanks to her efforts in containing the damage caused by the incident.

to:

[[folder:Anime and Manga]]
[[folder:Film Animated]]
* In ''Audioplay/StrikersSoundStageX'', Teana is nearly put on trial for [[spoiler:unwittingly collaborating with Disney's ''Disney/{{Mulan}}''.
--> '''The Emperor of China''': I've heard a great deal about you, Fa Mulan. You stole your father's armor, ran away from home, impersonated a soldier, deceived your commanding officer, dishonored
the terrorist mastermind]] but is let off with a warning thanks to her efforts in containing the damage caused by the incident.Chinese Army, ''destroyed my palace,'' and... [[ArsonMurderAndLifeSaving you have saved us all]].



[[folder:Film]]

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[[folder:Film]][[folder:Film Live-Action]]



* Literature/HarryPotter
** In the [[Literature/HarryPotterAndTheChamberOfSecrets second book]], Dumbledore ''tells him he broke about a hundred school rules'', then gives him an Award for Special Services to the School because saving Ginny and the rest of the school from Tom Riddle [[spoiler:(aka Voldemort)]] outweighed the rule breaking.
** It's even a plot point in the [[Literature/HarryPotterAndTheOrderOfThePhoenix fifth book]], where a TyrantTakesTheHelm and begins banning things left and right to stop any attempt by the PowerTrio to teach their fellow students defense against the dark arts. Harry even notes at one point that now that Dumbledore has virtually no power, he can't count on this to save him. He eventually does so anyway, reasoning that even if he's expelled, the students he taught will be safer. [[spoiler: Then it sort of works, as Dumbledore manages to shift all blame on himself, letting the members and Harry get away scot-free.]]



* ''Literature/InDeath'' series: Eve Dallas is one of the best cops there is. She has broken a lot of rules and laws to achieve actual justice. While it seems that her superiors don't know about the methods she uses to achieve results, there are indications that they know she is working around the law, but as long as she succeeds, they have no problem with that.
* ''Literature/VorkosiganSaga'': Miles Vorkosigan manages this often in his career in [=ImpSec=]. Miles has a...problem with following orders, and those above constantly complain about his "excessive initiative" or curse him by wishing he one day commands someone "just like him". This trope is probably most notable in ''Literature/TheVorGame''. Miles is sent to a deadend position for just 6 months to prove he can follow orders, he comes home in 3 months [[spoiler:with a charge of treason]] but is forgiven because his refusal to keep his head down managed to [[spoiler:prevent a crazy near-homicidal commanding officer from allowing a group of techs that refused to obey his orders (to pointlessly risk themselves cleaning up a toxic spill) from freezing to death]]. He is put under the one man who could possible deal with him and sent on a simple intelligence gathering mission, by the end of which he manages to have 3 separate 'superior officers' locked in the brig so he can go about [[spoiler:leading a mercenary troop to defend a wormhole from an enemy invasion]] which no one ever asked him to do. But since he did manage to save everyone he ends up with a promotion and his dream job of [[spoiler:playing admiral for said military fleet]].
* Harry Dresden of ''Literature/TheDresdenFiles'' is able to get away with some BlackMagic in ''Literature/DeadBeat'' through a combination of LoopholeAbuse, [[IDidWhatIHadToDo necessity]], and the fact that [[spoiler:reanimating a ''TyrannosaurusRex'']] was so unspeakably ''awesome'' that even some of the Wardens were impressed.
** They needed the firepower. As he'd pointed out, the Wardens had already ''drafted him''. Harry Dresden is one of the best examples of a cowboy PI in literature, and doesn't play well with ''rules'' or ''authority''.
** Some of the Summer Court's best hitmen have let him get away on the basis of personal respect and LoopholeAbuse.
** Unfortunately, Murphy repeatedly gets none of this.



* ''Literature/TheDresdenFiles'':
** Harry Dresden is able to get away with some BlackMagic in ''Literature/DeadBeat'' through a combination of LoopholeAbuse, [[IDidWhatIHadToDo necessity]], and the fact that [[spoiler:reanimating a ''TyrannosaurusRex'']] was so unspeakably ''awesome'' that even some of the Wardens were impressed.
*** They needed the firepower. As he'd pointed out, the Wardens had already ''drafted him''. Harry Dresden is one of the best examples of a cowboy PI in literature, and doesn't play well with ''rules'' or ''authority''.
** Some of the Summer Court's best hitmen have let him get away on the basis of personal respect and LoopholeAbuse.
** Unfortunately, Murphy repeatedly gets none of this.
* Literature/HarryPotter
** In the [[Literature/HarryPotterAndTheChamberOfSecrets second book]], Dumbledore ''tells him he broke about a hundred school rules'', then gives him an Award for Special Services to the School because saving Ginny and the rest of the school from Tom Riddle [[spoiler:(aka Voldemort)]] outweighed the rule breaking.
** It's even a plot point in the [[Literature/HarryPotterAndTheOrderOfThePhoenix fifth book]], where a TyrantTakesTheHelm and begins banning things left and right to stop any attempt by the PowerTrio to teach their fellow students defense against the dark arts. Harry even notes at one point that now that Dumbledore has virtually no power, he can't count on this to save him. He eventually does so anyway, reasoning that even if he's expelled, the students he taught will be safer. [[spoiler: Then it sort of works, as Dumbledore manages to shift all blame on himself, letting the members and Harry get away scot-free.]]
* ''Literature/InDeath'' series: Eve Dallas is one of the best cops there is. She has broken a lot of rules and laws to achieve actual justice. While it seems that her superiors don't know about the methods she uses to achieve results, there are indications that they know she is working around the law, but as long as she succeeds, they have no problem with that.



* ''Literature/VorkosiganSaga'': Miles Vorkosigan manages this often in his career in [=ImpSec=]. Miles has a...problem with following orders, and those above constantly complain about his "excessive initiative" or curse him by wishing he one day commands someone "just like him". This trope is probably most notable in ''Literature/TheVorGame''. Miles is sent to a deadend position for just 6 months to prove he can follow orders, he comes home in 3 months [[spoiler:with a charge of treason]] but is forgiven because his refusal to keep his head down managed to [[spoiler:prevent a crazy near-homicidal commanding officer from allowing a group of techs that refused to obey his orders (to pointlessly risk themselves cleaning up a toxic spill) from freezing to death]]. He is put under the one man who could possible deal with him and sent on a simple intelligence gathering mission, by the end of which he manages to have 3 separate 'superior officers' locked in the brig so he can go about [[spoiler:leading a mercenary troop to defend a wormhole from an enemy invasion]] which no one ever asked him to do. But since he did manage to save everyone he ends up with a promotion and his dream job of [[spoiler:playing admiral for said military fleet]].



[[folder:Live Action TV]]

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[[folder:Live Action TV]][[folder:Live-Action TV]]
* In the pilot of ''Series/{{Airwolf}}'', Stringfellow Hawke robs the United States Freakin' Government and withholds their prize titular helicopter (though he agrees to fly it on their behalf in the future). He wisely did this ''after'' stealing said helicopter from terrorist dictators and the MadScientist that invented it. He also killed said MadScientist, who'd pissed off the government by murdering a bunch of Feds during a test run.
* Subverted on ''{{Series/CSI}}'', when the team manage to solve the case despite all the evidence being stolen while they were having breakfast at a nearby diner. Ecklie says it won't be a case of "No harm, no foul" and that there will still be an internal investigation. Played straight in that he's implied to only be doing it to get at Grissom.
* Several characters from ''{{Series/MASH}}'', most notably Hawkeye, get out of trouble this way on a regular basis.
* ''Series/{{Merlin|2008}}'' in the series finale [[spoiler:uses his magic, forbidden in Camelot, to curbstomp the troops at Camlann and save all of Camelot and by extension the United Kingdoms. Add one ReasonableAuthorityFigure and it's not hard to guess what happened afterwards.]]



* In the pilot of ''Series/{{Airwolf}}'', Stringfellow Hawke robs the United States Freakin' Government and withholds their prize titular helicopter (though he agrees to fly it on their behalf in the future). He wisely did this ''after'' stealing said helicopter from terrorist dictators and the MadScientist that invented it. He also killed said MadScientist, who'd pissed off the government by murdering a bunch of Feds during a test run.
* Several characters from ''{{Series/MASH}}'', most notably Hawkeye, get out of trouble this way on a regular basis.
* Subverted on ''{{Series/CSI}}'', when the team manage to solve the case despite all the evidence being stolen while they were having breakfast at a nearby diner. Ecklie says it won't be a case of "No harm, no foul" and that there will still be an internal investigation. Played straight in that he's implied to only be doing it to get at Grissom.
* Series/{{Merlin}} in the series finale [[spoiler:uses his magic, forbidden in Camelot, to curbstomp the troops at Camlann and save all of Camelot and by extension the United Kingdoms. Add one ReasonableAuthorityFigure and it's not hard to guess what happened afterwards.]]



* Used in [[Recap/TheLegendOfKorraS3E7OriginalAirbenders Original Airbenders]], when Kai uses aggressive airbending to save Jinora. Tenzin comments on this.
--->'''Tenzin:''' An airbender ''never'' attacks a defenseless opponent. ''[beat]'' [[PapaWolf But that was very good technique]].

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* ''WesternAnimation/TheLegendOfKorra'': Used in [[Recap/TheLegendOfKorraS3E7OriginalAirbenders Original Airbenders]], "Original Airbenders"]], when Kai uses aggressive airbending to save Jinora. Tenzin comments on this.
--->'''Tenzin:''' -->'''Tenzin:''' An airbender ''never'' attacks a defenseless opponent. ''[beat]'' [[PapaWolf But that was very good technique]].

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