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* ''WesternAnimation/ReadyJetGo'' thrives off of this trope. The Propulsions coincidentally look like humans, which allows them to hide in plain sight on Earth easily without anyone discovering their secret alien identity. Averted with Sunspot, some characters like Dr. Rafferty and Mitchell often question what kind of animal he is.

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* Both ''Series/BreakingBad'' and ''Series/BetterCallSaul'' have Gustavo Fring, who camouflages being one of the biggest drug kingpins in Albuquerque with his legitimate restaurant business and a reputation as a friend to law enforcement.


* ''Literature/MistressOfTheArtOfDeath'': You'd think that '' '''Excalibur''' '' would be locked away in a heavily guarded treasure chest. No, instead it's been slid inside a wooden cross and given to a teenage boy to carry.
* Creator/EdgarAllanPoe's story "Literature/ThePurloinedLetter" is probably the UrExample. A blackmailer's home was searched for an incriminating letter. Even though they searched under every rug, in every drawer, for loose paperwork in every book, and for hollow hidden compartments in the furniture, the searchers never found it because they didn't bother to consider and look closely at a torn and crumpled letter, clearly visible in a card rack hanging on the mantelpiece.

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* ''Literature/MistressOfTheArtOfDeath'': You'd think that '' '''Excalibur''' '' would In the ''Literature/{{Acacia}}'' trilogy ''The Song of Elenet'', a spellbook containing the most powerful and dangerous spells known to humanity turns out to be locked away an unmarked book in the royal library.
* In the opening chapter of ''Never Say Die'' (the 11th ''Literature/AlexRider'' book),
a heavily guarded treasure chest. No, instead it's been slid top-secret helicopter is stolen and disguised, by tilting it vertically and covering the fuselage with plywood, as a windmill. Agents searching the area assume the windmill is too small to hide the helicopter inside a wooden cross and given to a teenage boy to carry.
* Creator/EdgarAllanPoe's story "Literature/ThePurloinedLetter" is probably the UrExample. A blackmailer's home was searched for an incriminating letter. Even though they searched under every rug, in every drawer, for loose paperwork in every book, and for hollow hidden compartments in the furniture, the searchers
so never found it because they didn't bother to consider and look closely at a torn and crumpled letter, clearly visible in a card rack hanging on the mantelpiece.there.



* ''[[Literature/KeysToTheKingdom Superior Saturday]]'' uses and references the trope, as the Simultaneous Nebuchadnezzar is kept on a shelf of similar bottles, which is referred to as the 'purloined letter'.
* Creator/GKChesterton's story ''[[Literature/FatherBrown The Invisible Man]]'' is another well-known case: a murder takes place in a house while witnesses posted near the entrance swear nobody walked in. It turns out that nobody had noticed [[spoiler:the postman]]. Many other Chesterton stories use the trope in various ways.
* There's a Creator/JohnDicksonCarr story where a killer hides a glass knife by dropping it into a jug of water. This was referenced in a ''[[Literature/TheThreeInvestigators Three Investigators]]'' mystery where a glass statue is hidden in a swimming pool. Jupiter Jones figures it out by remembering the Carr story. It's also referenced in Creator/LarryNiven's "Literature/WhatGoodIsAGlassDagger", in which a wizard also points out (fatally) that wizards can use non-magical weapons as well as magical ones.
** This might not work with water and glass, which have an index of refraction of 1.33 and 1.5 respectively, but it works excellently with glass and corn syrup, which apparently have the same refractive index.
* One of the pearls from "Pearls of Lutra" in ''Literature/{{Redwall}}'' had one of them suspended in candle wax in the main hall.
* The entrance to [[BeneathTheEarth Underland]] in Creator/CSLewis' ''Literature/TheChroniclesOfNarnia: Literature/TheSilverChair'' is hidden in the ruins of a Giant city, under the remains of a slab engraved "UNDER ME" in lettering so enormous that the protagonists actually traverse it, taking the letters for oddly-dug trenches, without realizing what it is.



* Creator/DianaWynneJones's ''Literature/TheMagiciansOfCaprona'' - The true words to the hymn ''Angel of Caprona'' that will solve everything are [[spoiler:just the old words in Latin, carved onto humongous angelic statues in plain view]].
* In ''The Pink Motel'' the kidnappers left a note on the bathroom mirror. The detectives spend a good amount of time looking around before someone suggests looking in the obvious places.
* The short story ''Lamb to the Slaughter'' by Creator/RoaldDahl is about a pregnant woman who, in a fit of rage when her husband announces that he's leaving her, kills him by striking him in the head with a frozen leg of lamb. The police never find the murder weapon because she cooks it before they arrive, and thoughtfully offers them dinner before they leave. During that dinner, one of the policemen remarks that "the evidence must be under our very eyes".
* In ''Discworld/FeetOfClay'', the patrician is being poisoned by arsenic [[spoiler:from his ''candles.'' It wasn't worked out for such a long time because they are what allow you to look, not something you look at]]. As Vetinari himself says in a possibly poison-induced rambling, don't put it in the last place they will look, put it where they will never look '''at all'''.
** Just to show how badass he is [[spoiler: Vetinari actually figures it out much earlier, he would cut the candles down, light them for a few minutes, and hide the cut off part. He faked the illness afterward]]. The [[TheManBehindTheMan villain]] of the story meets his downfall this way; as he hid the ''murderer'' in plain sight: [[spoiler: the fish-shaped lamp on the candle maker's crest; the ''[[GratuitousFrench Lampe de Poisson]]'' a.k.a [[CanisLatinicus poison lamp]], along with the family motto "Art Brought Forth The Candle" meaning in Discworld pseudo-latin ''[[{{Pun}} Ars Enixa]] Est Candelam''.]] He [[{{Pride}} didn't think]] that Vimes would be intelligent enough to notice.
*** Sam Vimes later uses the same trick to give himself the advantage in a fight with [[spoiler: Dragon, by earlier replacing his candle order with ones that had their wicks soaked in holy water]].
** Referenced in ''Discworld/TheFifthElephant'', when Vimes speculates that the missing Scone of Stone could have been on display in the Dwarf Bread Museum all along. Carrot shoots down his theory by pointing out that the museum's replica Scone is marked on its underside to distinguish it as a fake.
** Vetinari seems to love these. In ''Discworld/NightWatch'', he hides a book describing the secrets of camouflage by putting it in his library. With the cover "Memoirs of the Great Accountants".
*** Even moreso, when he's using just simple coloration, and other simple techniques like standing perfectly still in a dimly-lit area to give off the appearance of.. well.. disappearing.
*** Vetinari is so good at hiding that his Stealth Instructor insisted he had never attended a single class.
** In ''Discworld/MenAtArms'' TalkingAnimal Gaspode claims that Big Fido won't mess with him because he has "the power", though he won't specify what that is. Later in the book, the audience learns that "the power" is [[spoiler: speaking Human, which invokes a dog's natural instinct to obey]] which is the first thing about Gaspode they knew.
** The whole concept of hiding in plain sight is subverted in the later book ''Discworld/RaisingSteam'', where a footnote on the Battle of Koom Valley notes that a Troll general used FridgeLogic to get around the fact the Dwarfs always knew where to find an army of Trolls was that they'd scout for hidden Trolls in amongst the rocks and boulders. ([[NWordPrivileges Rocks]] hiding as rocks). Therefore he had the whole Troll army stand motionless out in the plain on the valley floor, while the Dwarfs would fruitlessly search for them in the foothills and boulder fields. We are told this worked perfectly until the morning mist lifted. Then both sides claimed each ambushed the other, simultaneously.
* In ''Discworld/WitchesAbroad'', Granny Weatherwax is imprisoned within a mirror. Inside the mirror, she sees an infinite number of reflections of herself, as Death asks her to pick the one who is herself. She asks "Is this a trick question?", receives "NO" as the answer, then points at herself. Death smiles and Granny is freed. Sadly, [[spoiler:her now-evil sister, Lily]] will be running forever through the infinite reflections trying to find herself.
* The point of ''Literature/NellyTheMonsterSitter'' is that monsters ''do'' exist among us, but they don't have babysitters to look after their needy children and therefore cannot leave their homes, which convinces Nelly to become one in her local area. She is amazed at how quickly the responses were after she put an advert in the local newspaper. It's also surprising that many of the monsters live in the suburban neighbourhoods of Nelly's local area.



* Dick Francis' ''Dead on Red'' features an assassin who lives in France, and takes a contract in England. Since he's a licensed firearms instructor, he simply crosses the channel with his guns as normal luggage, having filled out the requisite forms.

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* Dick Francis' ''Dead on Red'' features an assassin who lives in France, In Creator/FritzLeiber's ''The Big Time'', a piece of equipment, the "Major Maintainer", seemingly vanishes from the extra-temporal Place. The characters know that it couldn't have been removed from the room, since it is the very machine whose presence maintains the Place's continued existence, but it's nowhere to be found even after they ransack the entire room. It turns out that [[spoiler:one of the characters had turned it inside-out, using one of the medical machines, and takes a contract in England. Since he's a licensed firearms instructor, he simply crosses hid the channel with his guns as normal luggage, having filled out the requisite forms.resulting unrecognizable object among a gallery of equally abstract-looking alien art pieces]].



* Melisande's plan to escape into La Serimissa in ''[[Literature/KushielsLegacy Kushiel's Chosen]]'' relied on this trope. Her looks were so striking that anybody looking for her would have an easy time spotting her. She decided to walk out in the open as [[spoiler: Prince Benidicte's]] new D'Angeline wife who wore a veil because of her faith in the goddess Asherat.
* In Rory Clements's ''Martyr'' (set in Elizabethan England), a Catholic priest in London dresses in bright, lavish, fashionable clothes. People trying to catch priests would be looking for people trying to avoid being seen; they "wouldn't suspect what their eyes alit upon so easily."
* In Creator/JackMcDevitt's ''Literature/InfinityBeach'', both major {{MacGuffin}}s -- the unaltered ''Hunter'' logs and the alien spaceship -- turn out to be hidden in plain sight.
* Throughout the ''Literature/{{Safehold}}'' series, an object referred to only as "the Key" had been referred to by members of the Wylsynn family as an item entrusted to them by the [[GodGuise Archangel]] Schueler. In the fifth book, ''How Firm A Foundation'', we learn specifically what the Key is. Among other things, it's of such size and shape that it can be easily used as a paperweight, which is how several Wylsynns, including its current possessor Paityr, hid it.
* Used in the ''Literature/{{Mistborn}}'' series. In the second book, the main characters trying to establish a stable, non-despotic government learn that it has been infiltrated by a shapeshifter. [[spoiler: TheMole finally turns out to be not the butler or TheBigGuy or anyone else the viewpoint characters considered, but the shapeshifter on ''their own'' team.]]
* In ''[[Literature/JudgeDee The Haunted Monastery]]'', a missing girl is hidden as [[spoiler:one of the statues in a diorama showing the Taoist Hells. She's immobilized and covered with plaster, but manages to move just enough for a spear to make her bleed]].
* There is a mention in the Literature/VorkosiganSaga of a retainer of the Vorkosigan family who did the smuggling gag with pack horses. Miles uses that historical example to come up with a plan to smuggle used spaceships to a station that needs to augment its war fleet in ''Literature/MirrorDance''.
* Creator/RaymondChandler's ''Literature/FarewellMyLovely'' contains a case where Moose Malloy is looking for his red-haired sweetheart Velma, who either died or skipped town while he was in prison after being framed. [[spoiler:Come the finale, it's revealed that Mrs. Grayle (Marlowe's employer for his second, seemingly irrelevant case) is actually a disguised Velma, and was responsible for framing Moose, murdering Lin Marriott, and attacking Marlowe previously; in other words, ''the book's damsel in distress was actually the villain disguised as the moll''.]]
* In ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire'':
** After Joffrey Baratheon orders the death of her father, Arya Stark escapes from King's Landing by having her hair cut short and dressing like a boy.
** Littlefinger's illegitimate daughter Alayne is a pretty maid with brown hair, [[spoiler: which she must [[DyeOrDie keep dyeing brown]] since she's really Sansa Stark and her trademark auburn Tully hair screams her true identity.]]
** There is in Essos the young son of a hedge knight who dyes his hair blue to mourn his Tyroshi mother [[spoiler: or maybe he simply needs to hide his silver-white hair since they scream Targaryen. Or Blackfyre.]]



* Aly prefers to operate like this in ''Literature/DaughterOfTheLioness''. When the duke and duchess offer her freedom, she actually asks them not to remove her SlaveCollar because slaves have an excuse to be anywhere, plus soldiers and nobles don't pay any attention to them. When she's "promoted" to free servant, she becomes Dove's maid so she can listen in on all the palace conversations Dove is a part of.
* In the Literature/RepairmanJack novel ''Legacies'', a spy spends days watching a lamp-lit window where two men keep standing in silent awe, staring at something. The spy assumes they've got something that requires light sitting under the lamp, because they never turn it off. [[spoiler: It's actually ''the lamp'' they're staring at, because it's drawing its electricity via a revolutionary new technology and they're amazed that it's staying lit at all.]]
* The Jack Higgins thriller ''Night of the Fox'' (later adapted into a movie) has OSS agent Harry Martineau posing as an SS officer for a mission in the Jersey Islands. When Field Marshall Erwin Rommel comes for a surprise inspection, Harry decides to kill him to aid the Allied war effort. But he's naturally thrown when he suddenly hears Rommel uttering a Jewish phrase while in private. Held at gunpoint, the truth comes out: Rommel is meeting with German generals in a plot against Hitler and to cover himself has lookalike Corporal Eric Berger posing as him. But Berger was killed three years earlier with his family in a bombing raid. The man before Harry is Heini Baum, a Jewish actor who was on the run when he found Berger's body, with call-up papers in the pocket. As crazy as it sounded, Baum sums it up: "what better place for a Jew to hide but in the German army?"
* In the ''Literature/{{Acacia}}'' trilogy ''The Song of Elenet'', a spellbook containing the most powerful and dangerous spells known to humanity, turns out to be an unmarked book in the royal library.
* In the ''Literature/DresdenFiles'' series, Harry Dresden is at one point given ''Fidelaccius'', Sword of the Cross (aka {{Kusanagi}}) for safekeeping. He promptly sticks it, [[SwordCane cane-like sheath and all]], in the popcorn tub he uses as an umbrella stand. It remains there, undisturbed save for his maintenance, for upwards of five years, through home invasions, all sorts of guests, even his brother living ''in the same room'' (it's a small apartment) for almost a year. [[AWizardDidIt Divine providence is probably to blame]].
** In White Night, Dresden suspects a few different characters throughout the book. The REAL killer is in fact [[spoiler:one of the Ordo Lebes themselves, the woman always wearing just enough clothing to cover up her being an effeminate white court vampire who has been infiltrating groups like this for months now, never being suspected as he acted like "one of them".]] They're mentioned multiple times, and takes a bit of a more active role in the story towards the end, but not until the very end around when Dresden himself figures it out would you have thought them to be the killer.

to:

* Aly prefers to operate like this in ''Literature/DaughterOfTheLioness''. When the duke and duchess offer her freedom, she actually asks them not to remove her SlaveCollar because slaves have an excuse to be anywhere, plus soldiers and nobles don't pay any attention to them. When she's "promoted" to free servant, she becomes Dove's maid so she can listen in on all the palace conversations Dove is There's a part of.
* In the Literature/RepairmanJack novel ''Legacies'', a spy spends days watching a lamp-lit window
Creator/JohnDicksonCarr story where two men keep standing in silent awe, staring at something. The spy assumes they've got something that requires light sitting under the lamp, because they never turn a killer hides a glass knife by dropping it off. [[spoiler: It's actually ''the lamp'' they're staring at, because it's drawing its electricity via a revolutionary new technology and they're amazed that it's staying lit at all.]]
* The Jack Higgins thriller ''Night of the Fox'' (later adapted
into a movie) has OSS agent Harry Martineau posing as an SS officer for a mission in the Jersey Islands. When Field Marshall Erwin Rommel comes for a surprise inspection, Harry decides to kill him to aid the Allied war effort. But he's naturally thrown when he suddenly hears Rommel uttering a Jewish phrase while in private. Held at gunpoint, the truth comes out: Rommel is meeting with German generals jug of water. This was referenced in a plot against Hitler and to cover himself has lookalike Corporal Eric Berger posing as him. But Berger was killed three years earlier with his family ''[[Literature/TheThreeInvestigators Three Investigators]]'' mystery where a glass statue is hidden in a bombing raid. The man before Harry is Heini Baum, a Jewish actor who was on the run when he found Berger's body, with call-up papers in the pocket. As crazy as it sounded, Baum sums it up: "what better place for a Jew to hide but in the German army?"
* In the ''Literature/{{Acacia}}'' trilogy ''The Song of Elenet'', a spellbook containing the most powerful and dangerous spells known to humanity, turns out to be an unmarked book in the royal library.
* In the ''Literature/DresdenFiles'' series, Harry Dresden is at one point given ''Fidelaccius'', Sword of the Cross (aka {{Kusanagi}}) for safekeeping. He promptly sticks it, [[SwordCane cane-like sheath and all]], in the popcorn tub he uses as an umbrella stand. It remains there, undisturbed save for his maintenance, for upwards of five years, through home invasions, all sorts of guests, even his brother living ''in the same room'' (it's a small apartment) for almost a year. [[AWizardDidIt Divine providence is probably to blame]].
** In White Night, Dresden suspects a few different characters throughout the book. The REAL killer is in fact [[spoiler:one of the Ordo Lebes themselves, the woman always wearing just enough clothing to cover up her being an effeminate white court vampire who has been infiltrating groups like this for months now, never being suspected as he acted like "one of them".]] They're mentioned multiple times, and takes a bit of a more active role in the story towards the end, but not until the very end around when Dresden himself
swimming pool. Jupiter Jones figures it out would you by remembering the Carr story. It's also referenced in Creator/LarryNiven's "Literature/WhatGoodIsAGlassDagger", in which a wizard also points out (fatally) that wizards can use non-magical weapons as well as magical ones.
** This might not work with water and glass, which
have thought them to be an index of refraction of 1.33 and 1.5 respectively, but it works excellently with glass and corn syrup, which apparently have the killer.same refractive index.
* Creator/DianaWynneJones' ''Literature/{{Chrestomanci}}'': In ''Literature/TheMagiciansOfCaprona'', the true words to the hymn ''Angel of Caprona'' that will solve everything are [[spoiler:just the old words in Latin, carved onto humongous angelic statues in plain view]].



** In ''The ABC Murders,'' the mastermind behind the titular crimes [[spoiler: is the brother of the "C" victim, with that particular death as his goal all along; he deliberately murdered three other people with matching initials to create the illusion of a nutty serial killer and thus disguise his motives]].
** In "Miss Marple Tells a Story," the culprit behind a murder turns out to be [[spoiler: a woman disguised as a chambermaid; Miss Marple herself points out that no one really notices maids, so even eyewitnesses who saw the woman enter the victim's room wouldn't be able to provide an accurate description]].
** In "At the Bells and Motley," one of the Harley Quinn stories, a group of clever antique thieves disguise themselves as a married couple and furnish their new home with their spoils; when the husband mysteriously "vanishes," the distraught wife immediately sells the house, including the furniture, to an overseas buyer. No one questions her actions, because they're totally in line with those of a grieving widow.
** In "The Sign in the Sky," another Harley Quinn story, the murderer [[spoiler: insists on winding all the clocks in his mansion himself; on the day of the crime, he secretly places the clocks back an extra ten minutes, then goes about his day, thus creating an alibi for himself at the supposed time of the murder.]]

to:

** In ''The ABC Murders,'' Murders'', the mastermind behind the titular crimes [[spoiler: is [[spoiler:is the brother of the "C" victim, with that particular death as his goal all along; he deliberately murdered three other people with matching initials to create the illusion of a nutty serial killer and thus disguise his motives]].
** In "Miss Marple Tells a Story," Story", the culprit behind a murder turns out to be [[spoiler: a [[spoiler:a woman disguised as a chambermaid; Miss Marple herself points out that no one really notices maids, so even eyewitnesses who saw the woman enter the victim's room wouldn't be able to provide an accurate description]].
** In "At the Bells and Motley," Motley", one of the Harley Quinn Quin stories, a group of clever antique thieves disguise themselves as a married couple and furnish their new home with their spoils; when the husband mysteriously "vanishes," "vanishes", the distraught wife immediately sells the house, including the furniture, to an overseas buyer. No one questions her actions, because they're totally in line with those of a grieving widow.
** In "The Sign in the Sky," Sky", another Harley Quinn story, the murderer [[spoiler: insists on winding all the clocks in his mansion himself; on the day of the crime, he secretly places the clocks back an extra ten minutes, then goes about his day, thus creating an alibi for himself at the supposed time of the murder.]]



** In ''Literature/AndThenThereWereNone'', [[spoiler: Justice Wargrave disguises himself as his own corpse, then secretly moves about the mansion when no one is watching, figuring that the dead are above suspicion]].
** ''The Murder of Roger Ackroyd'', the novel that established her as a master of the crime genre. Who is the murderer? [[spoiler: ''The man narrating the novel!'']]

to:

** In ''Literature/AndThenThereWereNone'', [[spoiler: Justice [[spoiler:Justice Wargrave disguises himself as his own corpse, then secretly moves about the mansion when no one is watching, figuring that the dead are above suspicion]].
** ''The Murder of Roger Ackroyd'', ''Literature/TheMurderOfRogerAckroyd'', the novel that established her as a master of the crime genre. Who is the murderer? [[spoiler: ''The man narrating the novel!'']]novel!'']]
* The entrance to [[BeneathTheEarth Underland]] in Creator/CSLewis' ''Literature/TheChroniclesOfNarnia: Literature/TheSilverChair'' is hidden in the ruins of a Giant city, under the remains of a slab engraved "UNDER ME" in lettering so enormous that the protagonists actually traverse it, taking the letters for oddly-dug trenches, without realizing what it is.
* Dick Francis' ''Dead on Red'' features an assassin who lives in France, and takes a contract in England. Since he's a licensed firearms instructor, he simply crosses the channel with his guns as normal luggage, having filled out the requisite forms.
* ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'':
** In ''Discworld/FeetOfClay'', the patrician is being poisoned by arsenic [[spoiler:from his ''candles.'' It wasn't worked out for such a long time because they are what allow you to look, not something you look at]]. As Vetinari himself says in a possibly poison-induced rambling, don't put it in the last place they will look, put it where they will never look '''at all'''.
** Just to show how badass he is [[spoiler: Vetinari actually figures it out much earlier, he would cut the candles down, light them for a few minutes, and hide the cut off part. He faked the illness afterward]]. The [[TheManBehindTheMan villain]] of the story meets his downfall this way; as he hid the ''murderer'' in plain sight: [[spoiler:the fish-shaped lamp on the candle maker's crest; the ''[[GratuitousFrench Lampe de Poisson]]'' a.k.a [[CanisLatinicus poison lamp]], along with the family motto "Art Brought Forth he Candle", meaning in Discworld pseudo-latin ''[[{{Pun}} Ars Enixa]] Est Candelam'']]. He [[{{Pride}} didn't think]] that Vimes would be intelligent enough to notice.
*** Sam Vimes later uses the same trick to give himself the advantage in a fight with [[spoiler:Dragon, by earlier replacing his candle order with ones that had their wicks soaked in holy water]].
** Referenced in ''Discworld/TheFifthElephant'', when Vimes speculates that the missing Scone of Stone could have been on display in the Dwarf Bread Museum all along. Carrot shoots down his theory by pointing out that the museum's replica Scone is marked on its underside to distinguish it as a fake.
** Vetinari seems to love these. In ''Discworld/NightWatch'', he hides a book describing the secrets of camouflage by putting it in his library. With the cover "Memoirs of the Great Accountants".
*** Even moreso, when he's using just simple coloration, and other simple techniques like standing perfectly still in a dimly-lit area to give off the appearance of.. well.. disappearing.
*** Vetinari is so good at hiding that his Stealth Instructor insisted he had never attended a single class.
** In ''Discworld/MenAtArms'' TalkingAnimal Gaspode claims that Big Fido won't mess with him because he has "the power", though he won't specify what that is. Later in the book, the audience learns that "the power" is [[spoiler: speaking Human, which invokes a dog's natural instinct to obey]] which is the first thing about Gaspode they knew.
** The whole concept of hiding in plain sight is subverted in the later book ''Discworld/RaisingSteam'', where a footnote on the Battle of Koom Valley notes that a Troll general used FridgeLogic to get around the fact the Dwarfs always knew where to find an army of Trolls was that they'd scout for hidden Trolls in amongst the rocks and boulders. ([[NWordPrivileges Rocks]] hiding as rocks). Therefore he had the whole Troll army stand motionless out in the plain on the valley floor, while the Dwarfs would fruitlessly search for them in the foothills and boulder fields. We are told this worked perfectly until the morning mist lifted. Then both sides claimed each ambushed the other, simultaneously.
** In ''Discworld/WitchesAbroad'', Granny Weatherwax is imprisoned within a mirror. Inside the mirror, she sees an infinite number of reflections of herself, as Death asks her to pick the one who is herself. She asks "Is this a trick question?", receives "NO" as the answer, then points at herself. Death smiles and Granny is freed. Sadly, [[spoiler:her now-evil sister, Lily]] will be running forever through the infinite reflections trying to find herself.
* ''Literature/TheDresdenFiles'':
** Harry Dresden is at [[Literature/DeathMasks one point]] given ''Fidelacchius'', one of the Swords of the Cross (aka {{Kusanagi}}), for safekeeping. He promptly sticks it, [[SwordCane cane-like sheath and all]], in the popcorn tub he uses as an umbrella stand. It remains there, undisturbed save for his maintenance, for upwards of five years, through home invasions, all sorts of guests, even his brother living ''in the same room'' (it's a small apartment) for almost a year. [[AWizardDidIt Divine providence is probably to blame.]]
** ''Literature/WhiteNight'': Dresden suspects a few different characters throughout the book. The REAL killer is in fact [[spoiler:one of the Ordo Lebes themselves, the woman always wearing just enough clothing to cover up her being an effeminate White Court vampire who has been infiltrating groups like this for months now, never being suspected as he acted like "one of them".]] They're mentioned multiple times, and takes a bit of a more active role in the story towards the end, but not until the very end around when Dresden himself figures it out would you have thought them to be the killer.
* In ''Literature/{{Earthborn}}'', Shedemei decides to come down from the colony ship and mingle among her descendants, having had an inkling of brewing conflict. She takes a guise as an itinerant school teacher, under her real name. At this point in the series, her name has been practically deified as "The One Who Was Never Buried". Most people who know her simply assume she's an oddball with [[NamesTheSame Shedemei's name]], spelled and pronounced in the old way.
* Creator/RaymondChandler's ''Literature/FarewellMyLovely'' contains a case where Moose Malloy is looking for his red-haired sweetheart Velma, who either died or skipped town while he was in prison after being framed. [[spoiler:Come the finale, it's revealed that Mrs. Grayle (Marlowe's employer for his second, seemingly irrelevant case) is actually a disguised Velma, and was responsible for framing Moose, murdering Lin Marriott, and attacking Marlowe previously; in other words, ''the book's damsel in distress was actually the villain disguised as the moll''.]]
* Creator/GKChesterton's ''Literature/FatherBrown'': ''The Invisible Man'' is another well-known case: a murder takes place in a house while witnesses posted near the entrance swear nobody walked in. It turns out that nobody had noticed [[spoiler:the postman]]. Many other Chesterton stories use the trope in various ways.
* In Creator/JackMcDevitt's ''Literature/InfinityBeach'', both major {{MacGuffin}}s -- the unaltered ''Hunter'' logs and the alien spaceship -- turn out to be hidden in plain sight.
* ''Literature/JudgeDee'': In ''The Haunted Monastery'', a missing girl is hidden as [[spoiler:one of the statues in a diorama showing the Taoist Hells. She's immobilized and covered with plaster, but manages to move just enough for a spear to make her bleed]].
* ''Literature/KeysToTheKingdom'': ''Superior Saturday'' uses and references the trope, as the Simultaneous Nebuchadnezzar is kept on a shelf of similar bottles, which is referred to as the 'purloined letter'.
* Melisande's plan to escape into La Serinissima in ''[[Literature/KushielsLegacy Kushiel's Chosen]]'' relied on this trope. Her looks were so striking that anybody looking for her would have an easy time spotting her. She decided to walk out in the open as [[spoiler:Prince Benidicte's]] new D'Angeline wife who wore a veil because of her faith in the goddess Asherat.
* The short story ''Lamb to the Slaughter'' by Creator/RoaldDahl is about a pregnant woman who, in a fit of rage when her husband announces that he's leaving her, kills him by striking him in the head with a frozen leg of lamb. The police never find the murder weapon because she cooks it before they arrive, and thoughtfully offers them dinner before they leave. During that dinner, one of the policemen remarks that "the evidence must be under our very eyes".
* In Rory Clements's ''Martyr'' (set in Elizabethan England), a Catholic priest in London dresses in bright, lavish, fashionable clothes. People trying to catch priests would be looking for people trying to avoid being seen; they "wouldn't suspect what their eyes alit upon so easily."
* Used in the ''Literature/{{Mistborn}}'' series. In the second book, the main characters trying to establish a stable, non-despotic government learn that it has been infiltrated by a shapeshifter. [[spoiler: TheMole finally turns out to be not the butler or TheBigGuy or anyone else the viewpoint characters considered, but the shapeshifter on ''their own'' team.]]
* ''Literature/MistressOfTheArtOfDeath'': You'd think that '' '''Excalibur''' '' would be locked away in a heavily guarded treasure chest. No, instead it's been slid inside a wooden cross and given to a teenage boy to carry.
* The point of ''Literature/NellyTheMonsterSitter'' is that monsters ''do'' exist among us, but they don't have babysitters to look after their needy children and therefore cannot leave their homes, which convinces Nelly to become one in her local area. She is amazed at how quickly the responses were after she put an advert in the local newspaper. It's also surprising that many of the monsters live in the suburban neighbourhoods of Nelly's local area.



* In ''Literature/{{Earthborn}}'', Shedemei decides to come down from the colony ship and mingle among her decendants, having had an inkling of brewing conflict. She takes a guise as an itinerant school teacher, under her real name. At this point in the series, her name has been practically deified as "The One Who Was Never Buried". Most people who know her simply assume she's an oddball with [[NamesTheSame with Shedemei's name]], spelled and pronounced in the old way.
* In Creator/FritzLeiber's ''The Big Time'', a piece of equipment, the "Major Maintainer", seemingly vanishes from the extra-temporal Place. The characters know that it couldn't have been removed from the room, since it is the very machine whose presence maintains the Place's continued existence, but it's nowhere to be found even after they ransack the entire room. It turns out that [[spoiler:one of the characters had turned it inside-out, using one of the medical machines, and hid the resulting unrecognizable object among a gallery of equally abstract-looking alien art pieces]].
* ''Literature/WordsOfRadiance'' (second book of ''Literature/TheStormlightArchive''): The Parshendi are a bigger, smarter version of the parshmen that everyone in the world uses as slaves. When the Parshendi go to war with the Alethi, they easily slip a few moles in among the slaves. We first hear about this in one of Navani's journals (seen early in the book, but written after the events of the novel), where she notes that [[DidntSeeThatComing they really should have seen it coming]].
-->'''Rlain:''' We choose a form based on what we need, the job required of us. Dullform, one of those forms, looks a lot like a parshman. Hiding among them is easy.\\
'''Navani:''' We account our parshmen with precision.\\
'''Rlain:''' Yes, and we are noticed--but rarely questioned. Who questions when you find an extra sphere lying on the ground? It's not something suspicious. It's merely fortune.
** While not particularly surprising to the audience, the Voidbringers are this in-story from the human perspective. A number of them actually state outright that it was a bit obvious in retrospect, especially since [[IdiotBall pretty much everything they did know about the voidbringers was literally a physical description of them]].
* ''Literature/TheWanderingInn'':Rock Crabs hide their massive body under a giant shell that looks like a boulder. Since there are no other boulders in the Flood Plains, it makes them really easy to spot...assuming that you know that the giant rock is a monster.
* The titular artifacts in ''Literature/BandsOfMourning'' grant the holder every power in [[YinYangBomb both of the local magic systems.]] Where are they hidden? [[spoiler: They're the detachable spearhead in the statue right outside the DeathCourse protecting the fake Bands.]]
* ''LightNovel/TheUnexploredSummonBloodSign'':
** The Founder's Gallery is a collection of valuable secrets, and can only be found by gathering three particular artifacts. After Kyousuke has obtained all three, he realizes that the gallery [[spoiler:is on the floor below Aika's apartment. The same apartment he's in right now, ''which he's been using as a base for the entire series''.]]
** The seventh volume has the [[BigBad White Queen]] create numerous copies of herself. To defeat them, it's necessary to first find the original White Queen. [[spoiler:She's disguised herself as Aoi, Kyousuke's partner for the volume. This is particularly noteworthy because the real Aoi is physically identical to the White Queen and wears the same dress, so the White Queen literally only had to copy her behavior (and get the real one out of the way). Though unlike the previous example, Kyousuke actually figures this out before the White Queen reveals herself]].
* In ''Literature/TheWheelOfTime'', Birgitte -- better known as Birgitte Silverbow, Hero of the Horn, eternally reincarnating LivingLegend of innumerable generations -- goes by her real name and does nothing to hide her [[ImprobableAimingSkills astoundingly good archery]]. On the rare occasion that someone draws the connection between her and ''the'' Birgitte, she pulls some {{sarcastic|confession}} variant on NeverHeardThatOneBefore.
* In the opening chapter of ''Never Say Die'' (the 11th ''Literature/AlexRider'' book), a top-secret helicopter is stolen and disguised, by tilting it vertically and covering the fuselage with plywood, as a windmill. Agents searching the area assume the windmill is too small to hide the helicopter inside and so never look there.

to:

* In ''Literature/{{Earthborn}}'', Shedemei The Jack Higgins thriller ''Night of the Fox'' (later adapted into a movie) has OSS agent Harry Martineau posing as an SS officer for a mission in the Jersey Islands. When Field Marshall Erwin Rommel comes for a surprise inspection, Harry decides to come down from kill him to aid the colony ship and mingle among her decendants, having had an inkling of brewing conflict. She takes a guise as an itinerant school teacher, under her real name. At this point in the series, her name has been practically deified as "The One Who Was Never Buried". Most people who know her simply assume she's an oddball with [[NamesTheSame with Shedemei's name]], spelled and pronounced in the old way.
* In Creator/FritzLeiber's ''The Big Time'', a piece of equipment, the "Major Maintainer", seemingly vanishes from the extra-temporal Place. The characters know that it couldn't have been removed from the room, since it is the very machine whose presence maintains the Place's continued existence, but it's nowhere to be found even after they ransack the entire room. It turns out that [[spoiler:one of the characters had turned it inside-out, using one of the medical machines, and hid the resulting unrecognizable object among a gallery of equally abstract-looking alien art pieces]].
* ''Literature/WordsOfRadiance'' (second book of ''Literature/TheStormlightArchive''): The Parshendi are a bigger, smarter version of the parshmen that everyone in the world uses as slaves. When the Parshendi go to
Allied war with the Alethi, they easily slip a few moles in among the slaves. We first hear about this in one of Navani's journals (seen early in the book, but written after the events of the novel), where she notes that [[DidntSeeThatComing they really should have seen it coming]].
-->'''Rlain:''' We choose a form based on what we need, the job required of us. Dullform, one of those forms, looks a lot like a parshman. Hiding among them is easy.\\
'''Navani:''' We account our parshmen with precision.\\
'''Rlain:''' Yes, and we are noticed--but rarely questioned. Who questions when you find an extra sphere lying on the ground? It's not something suspicious. It's merely fortune.
** While not particularly surprising to the audience, the Voidbringers are this in-story from the human perspective. A number of them actually state outright that it was a bit obvious in retrospect, especially since [[IdiotBall pretty much everything they did know about the voidbringers was literally a physical description of them]].
* ''Literature/TheWanderingInn'':Rock Crabs hide their massive body under a giant shell that looks like a boulder. Since there are no other boulders in the Flood Plains, it makes them really easy to spot...assuming that you know that the giant rock is a monster.
* The titular artifacts in ''Literature/BandsOfMourning'' grant the holder every power in [[YinYangBomb both of the local magic systems.]] Where are they hidden? [[spoiler: They're the detachable spearhead in the statue right outside the DeathCourse protecting the fake Bands.]]
* ''LightNovel/TheUnexploredSummonBloodSign'':
** The Founder's Gallery is a collection of valuable secrets, and can only be found by gathering three particular artifacts. After Kyousuke has obtained all three, he realizes that the gallery [[spoiler:is on the floor below Aika's apartment. The same apartment
effort. But he's naturally thrown when he suddenly hears Rommel uttering a Jewish phrase while in right now, ''which he's been using as a base for private. Held at gunpoint, the entire series''.]]
**
truth comes out: Rommel is meeting with German generals in a plot against Hitler and to cover himself has lookalike Corporal Eric Berger posing as him. But Berger was killed three years earlier with his family in a bombing raid. The seventh volume has the [[BigBad White Queen]] create numerous copies of herself. To defeat them, it's necessary to first find the original White Queen. [[spoiler:She's disguised herself as Aoi, Kyousuke's partner for the volume. This is particularly noteworthy because the real Aoi is physically identical to the White Queen and wears the same dress, so the White Queen literally only had to copy her behavior (and get the real one out of the way). Though unlike the previous example, Kyousuke actually figures this out man before Harry is Heini Baum, a Jewish actor who was on the White Queen reveals herself]].
* In ''Literature/TheWheelOfTime'', Birgitte --
run when he found Berger's body, with call-up papers in the pocket. As crazy as it sounded, Baum sums it up: "what better known as Birgitte Silverbow, Hero of the Horn, eternally reincarnating LivingLegend of innumerable generations -- goes by her real name and does nothing place for a Jew to hide her [[ImprobableAimingSkills astoundingly good archery]]. On but in the rare occasion that someone draws the connection between her and ''the'' Birgitte, she pulls some {{sarcastic|confession}} variant on NeverHeardThatOneBefore.
* In the opening chapter of ''Never Say Die'' (the 11th ''Literature/AlexRider'' book), a top-secret helicopter is stolen and disguised, by tilting it vertically and covering the fuselage with plywood, as a windmill. Agents searching the area assume the windmill is too small to hide the helicopter inside and so never look there.
German army?"


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* In ''The Pink Motel'' the kidnappers left a note on the bathroom mirror. The detectives spend a good amount of time looking around before someone suggests looking in the obvious places.
* Creator/EdgarAllanPoe's story "Literature/ThePurloinedLetter" is probably the UrExample. A blackmailer's home was searched for an incriminating letter. Even though they searched under every rug, in every drawer, for loose paperwork in every book, and for hollow hidden compartments in the furniture, the searchers never found it because they didn't bother to consider and look closely at a torn and crumpled letter, clearly visible in a card rack hanging on the mantelpiece.
* ''Literature/{{Redwall}}'': In ''Pearls of Lutra'', one of the titular pearls is suspended in candle wax in the main hall.
* In the Literature/RepairmanJack novel ''Legacies'', a spy spends days watching a lamp-lit window where two men keep standing in silent awe, staring at something. The spy assumes they've got something that requires light sitting under the lamp, because they never turn it off. [[spoiler: It's actually ''the lamp'' they're staring at, because it's drawing its electricity via a revolutionary new technology and they're amazed that it's staying lit at all.]]
* Throughout the ''Literature/{{Safehold}}'' series, an object only known as "the Key" had been referred to by members of the Wylsynn family as an item entrusted to them by the [[GodGuise Archangel]] Schueler. In the fifth book, ''How Firm A Foundation'', we learn specifically what the Key is. Among other things, it's of such size and shape that it can be easily used as a paperweight, which is how several Wylsynns, including its current possessor Paityr, hid it.
* In ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire'':
** After Joffrey Baratheon orders the death of her father, Arya Stark escapes from King's Landing by having her hair cut short and dressing like a boy.
** Littlefinger's illegitimate daughter Alayne is a pretty maid with brown hair, [[spoiler: which she must [[DyeOrDie keep dyeing brown]] since she's really Sansa Stark and her trademark auburn Tully hair screams her true identity.]]
** There is in Essos the young son of a hedge knight who dyes his hair blue to mourn his Tyroshi mother [[spoiler: or maybe he simply needs to hide his silver-white hair since they scream Targaryen. Or Blackfyre.]]
* ''Literature/TheStormlightArchive'':
** ''Literature/WordsOfRadiance'': The Parshendi are a bigger, smarter version of the parshmen that everyone in the world uses as slaves. When the Parshendi go to war with the Alethi, they easily slip a few moles in among the slaves. We first hear about this in one of Navani's journals (seen early in the book, but written after the events of the novel), where she notes that [[DidntSeeThatComing they really should have seen it coming]].
--->'''Rlain:''' We choose a form based on what we need, the job required of us. Dullform, one of those forms, looks a lot like a parshman. Hiding among them is easy.\\
'''Navani:''' We account our parshmen with precision.\\
'''Rlain:''' Yes, and we are noticed but rarely questioned. Who questions when you find an extra sphere lying on the ground? It's not something suspicious. It's merely fortune.
** While not particularly surprising to the audience, the Voidbringers are this in-story from the human perspective. A number of them actually state outright that it was a bit obvious in retrospect, especially since [[IdiotBall pretty much everything they did know about the Voidbringers was literally a physical description of them]].
* ''Literature/TortallUniverse'': In the ''Literature/TrickstersDuet'', this is how Aly prefers to operate. When the duke and duchess offer her freedom, she actually asks them not to remove her SlaveCollar because slaves have an excuse to be anywhere, plus soldiers and nobles don't pay any attention to them. When she's "promoted" to free servant, she becomes Dove's maid so she can listen in on all the palace conversations Dove is a part of.
* ''LightNovel/TheUnexploredSummonBloodSign'':
** The Founder's Gallery is a collection of valuable secrets, and can only be found by gathering three particular artifacts. After Kyousuke has obtained all three, he realizes that the gallery [[spoiler:is on the floor below Aika's apartment. The same apartment he's in right now, ''which he's been using as a base for the entire series''.]]
** The seventh volume has the [[BigBad White Queen]] create numerous copies of herself. To defeat them, it's necessary to first find the original White Queen. [[spoiler:She's disguised herself as Aoi, Kyousuke's partner for the volume. This is particularly noteworthy because the real Aoi is physically identical to the White Queen and wears the same dress, so the White Queen literally only had to copy her behavior (and get the real one out of the way). Though unlike the previous example, Kyousuke actually figures this out before the White Queen reveals herself]].
* There is a mention in the ''Literature/VorkosiganSaga'' of a retainer of the Vorkosigan family who did the smuggling gag with pack horses. Miles uses that historical example to come up with a plan to smuggle used spaceships to a station that needs to augment its war fleet in ''Literature/MirrorDance''.
* ''Literature/TheWanderingInn'':Rock Crabs hide their massive body under a giant shell that looks like a boulder. Since there are no other boulders in the Flood Plains, it makes them really easy to spot...assuming that you know that the giant rock is a monster.
* ''Literature/WaxAndWayne'': The titular artifacts in ''Literature/TheBandsOfMourning'' grant the holder every power in [[YinYangBomb both of the local magic systems.]] Where are they hidden? [[spoiler:They're the detachable spearhead in the statue right outside the DeathCourse protecting the fake Bands.]]
* In ''Literature/TheWheelOfTime'', Birgitte -- better known as Birgitte Silverbow, Hero of the Horn, eternally reincarnating LivingLegend of innumerable generations -- goes by her real name and does nothing to hide her [[ImprobableAimingSkills astoundingly good archery]]. On the rare occasion that someone draws the connection between her and ''the'' Birgitte, she pulls some {{sarcastic|confession}} variant on NeverHeardThatOneBefore.

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* Louis CK incorporated his sexual abuse predilections into his comedy for years, including an episode in one series about his character (also named Louis CK) forcing a woman to watch him masturbate.

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[[folder:Podcasts]]
* ''Podcast/TheAdventureZoneBalance'' has [[spoiler: the Bulwark Staff, Lucretia's relic]], which appears [[spoiler: before the relics are even explained, and is mentioned in almost every arc.]]
[[/folder]]


* In ''Film/Oceans8'', how do the gang smuggle a $150 million necklace from a huge gala event? By [[spoiler: carefully breaking it into pieces and then each member walks right out of the museum wearing a piece as bracelets, earrings, etc.]]

to:

* In ''Film/Oceans8'', ''Film/OceansEight'', how do the gang smuggle a $150 million necklace from a huge gala event? By [[spoiler: carefully breaking it into pieces and then each member walks right out of the museum wearing a piece as bracelets, earrings, etc.]]

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* ''Webcomic/NeverSatisfied'': During the fourth test, where all the competitors have removed their [[AmplifierArtifact magic focus jewelry]] to avoid injuring each other, Philomena confesses to Lucy that [[spoiler:she can't operate the quartz shooters without an emerald to act as a focus. Later, she uses the emerald attached to her familiar's head to shoot Peony and herself, ending the test]].

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* In ''Comicbook/IronMan'', TheGreys are secretly running a Vegas casino. Said casino is shaped like a flying saucer and called Area 52. Nobody would believe it contained actual aliens.

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* ''ComicBook/YoungJustice'': [=SloBo=]'s final fate is being shot into the future by Darkseid and [[AndIMustScream immobilized]] in a hall of statues of historical heroes.
* ''ComicBook/RobinSeries'': During ''ComicBook/BatmanNoMansLand'' Tim's father makes a media circus of trying to get his son back after learning that he's made his way back to Gotham. While Tim's face is plastered everywhere even inside the condemned city Robin is very openly working in Gotham.


** Littlefinger's illegitimate daughter Alayne is a pretty maid with brown hair, [[spoiler: which she has to [[DyeOrDie keeps dyeing]] since she's really Sansa Stark and her trademark auburn Tully hair screams her true identity.]]

to:

** Littlefinger's illegitimate daughter Alayne is a pretty maid with brown hair, [[spoiler: which she has to must [[DyeOrDie keeps dyeing]] keep dyeing brown]] since she's really Sansa Stark and her trademark auburn Tully hair screams her true identity.]]


-->'''Contact''': So, where did you hide it?
-->'''Bullseye''': In a park about two miles from here, you can't miss it. I even painted a big X on the ground.

to:

-->'''Contact''': So, where did you hide it?
-->'''Bullseye''':
it?\\
'''Bullseye''':
In a park about two miles from here, you can't miss it. I even painted a big X on the ground.



* In ''WesternAnimation/KuboAndTheTwoStrings'', Kubo finds a legendary sword deep in a cavern and its corresponding legendary armor at the bottom of a lake. Kubo spends the longest time searching for the helmet to complete the set and ultimately finds it [[spoiler:as the bell rung every morning in the village near where he lives.]] Though this trope applying DID slow Kubo down a lot, he would have found it sooner had [[spoiler:the Moon King not appeared in his dreams to deliberately mislead him.]]

to:

* In ''WesternAnimation/KuboAndTheTwoStrings'', Kubo finds a legendary sword deep in a cavern and its corresponding legendary armor at the bottom of a lake. Kubo spends the longest time searching for the helmet to complete the set and ultimately finds it [[spoiler:as the bell rung every morning in the village near where he lives.]] Though this trope applying DID ''did'' slow Kubo down a lot, he would have found it sooner had [[spoiler:the Moon King not appeared in his dreams to deliberately mislead him.]]



** His science fiction short story "The Talking Stone" has the police searching for the coordinates for an uranium rich asteroid. In the end, they find them [[spoiler: hidden among the serial numbers of the miners' ship's and its components]].

to:

** His science fiction short story "The Talking Stone" has the police searching for the coordinates for an uranium rich uranium-rich asteroid. In the end, they find them [[spoiler: hidden among the serial numbers of the miners' ship's and its components]].



** Just to show how badass he is [[spoiler: Vetinari actually figures it out much earlier, he would cut the candles down, light them for a few minutes, and hide the cut off part. He faked the illness afterward]]. The [[TheManBehindTheMan villain]] of the story meets his downfall this way; as he hid the ''murderer'' in plain sight: [[spoiler: the fish shaped lamp on the candle maker's crest; the ''[[GratuitousFrench Lampe de Poisson]]'' a.k.a [[CanisLatinicus poison lamp]], along with the family motto "Art Brought Forth The Candle" meaning in Discworld pseudo-latin ''[[{{Pun}} Ars Enixa]] Est Candelam''.]] He [[{{Pride}} didn't think]] that Vimes would be intelligent enough to notice.

to:

** Just to show how badass he is [[spoiler: Vetinari actually figures it out much earlier, he would cut the candles down, light them for a few minutes, and hide the cut off part. He faked the illness afterward]]. The [[TheManBehindTheMan villain]] of the story meets his downfall this way; as he hid the ''murderer'' in plain sight: [[spoiler: the fish shaped fish-shaped lamp on the candle maker's crest; the ''[[GratuitousFrench Lampe de Poisson]]'' a.k.a [[CanisLatinicus poison lamp]], along with the family motto "Art Brought Forth The Candle" meaning in Discworld pseudo-latin ''[[{{Pun}} Ars Enixa]] Est Candelam''.]] He [[{{Pride}} didn't think]] that Vimes would be intelligent enough to notice.



* There is a mention in the Literature/VorkosiganSaga of a retainer of the Vorkosigan family who did the smuggling gag with pack horses. Miles uses that historical example to come up with a plan to smuggle used spaceships to a station that needs to augment its warfleet in ''Literature/MirrorDance''.

to:

* There is a mention in the Literature/VorkosiganSaga of a retainer of the Vorkosigan family who did the smuggling gag with pack horses. Miles uses that historical example to come up with a plan to smuggle used spaceships to a station that needs to augment its warfleet war fleet in ''Literature/MirrorDance''.



** Littlefinger's bastard daughter Alayne is a pretty maid with brown hair, [[spoiler: which she actually [[DyeOrDie keeps dyeing]] since she's really Sansa Stark and her trademark auburn Tully hair screams her true identity.]]
** There is in Essos the young son of a hedge knight who dyes his hair blue to mourn his Tyroshi mother [[spoiler: or maybe he simply needs to hise his silver-white hair since they scream Targaryen. Or Blackfyre.]]

to:

** Littlefinger's bastard illegitimate daughter Alayne is a pretty maid with brown hair, [[spoiler: which she actually has to [[DyeOrDie keeps dyeing]] since she's really Sansa Stark and her trademark auburn Tully hair screams her true identity.]]
** There is in Essos the young son of a hedge knight who dyes his hair blue to mourn his Tyroshi mother [[spoiler: or maybe he simply needs to hise hide his silver-white hair since they scream Targaryen. Or Blackfyre.]]



* ''Series/GameOfThrones'': How did Ned Stark managed to [[spoiler: hide his nephew Jon -- the son of his sister Lyanna and the last surviving child of Rhaegar Targaryen? By passing him off as his bastard son and raising him as part of the family]].

to:

* ''Series/GameOfThrones'': How did Ned Stark managed to [[spoiler: hide his nephew Jon -- the son of his sister Lyanna and the last surviving child of Rhaegar Targaryen? By passing him off as his bastard illegitimate son and raising him as part of the family]].



* The ''Franchise/AssassinsCreed'' games feature this. In the first game, Altair is able to stand within a group of monks and guards won't spot him as he and the monks are wearing similar colours. From the second game onwards, Ezio is able to do this with any group of people, based on the idea that he's simply lost in the crowd. Although when hiding in a group of courtesans, MaleGaze certainly comes into it. This ranges from plausible to ridiculous depending on the game later in the series, since the asssassin uniform stands out like a sore thumb in several of the eras featured.

to:

* The ''Franchise/AssassinsCreed'' games feature this. In the first game, Altair is able to stand within a group of monks and guards won't spot him as he and the monks are wearing similar colours. From the second game onwards, Ezio is able to do this with any group of people, based on the idea that he's simply lost in the crowd. Although when hiding in a group of courtesans, MaleGaze certainly comes into it. This ranges from plausible to ridiculous depending on the game later in the series, since the asssassin assassin uniform stands out like a sore thumb in several of the eras featured.



* A few ''Franchise/AceAttorney'' cases have the body of the victims being hidden in such a way, that hundreds of people are right near the body, but none of the actually notice it, due to it being disguised or concealed in some way.

to:

* A few ''Franchise/AceAttorney'' cases have the body of the victims being hidden in such a way, that hundreds of people are right near the body, but none of the them actually notice it, due to it being disguised or concealed in some way.



** In "Lisa the Vegetarian" the entrance to Apu's secret garden on the roof of the Kwik-E-Mart is a freezer compartment labeled "Non-alcoholic beer".

to:

** In "Lisa the Vegetarian" Vegetarian", the entrance to Apu's secret garden on the roof of the Kwik-E-Mart is a freezer compartment labeled "Non-alcoholic beer".'Non-alcoholic beer'.



* The ''WesternAnimation/YoungJustice'' HomeBase is Mount Justice, the former base of the Justice League until it was exposed to the world. [[RefugeInAudacity They gave the black ops team the base that everyone knows about.]] Since the team uses teleportation devices to enter and leave and Mount Justice has a self-contained power source, from the outside there's nothing to suggest it's been reactivated and thus it takes awhile before any villains find out. Building a whole new base from scratch without anybody noticing would've been much harder to pull off.

to:

* The ''WesternAnimation/YoungJustice'' HomeBase is Mount Justice, the former base of the Justice League until it was exposed to the world. [[RefugeInAudacity They gave the black ops team the base that everyone knows about.]] Since the team uses teleportation devices to enter and leave and Mount Justice has a self-contained power source, from the outside there's nothing to suggest it's been reactivated and thus it takes awhile a while before any villains find out. Building a whole new base from scratch without anybody noticing would've been much harder to pull off.



* A similar trick involves using a fake name and fake phone number as a user name and password, respectively, and adding them to your phone's contacts list. Even someone who thinks to check will have to fish it out of the list of actual contacts, and that's assuming they are able to bypass the phone's own locking measures.

to:

* A similar trick involves using a fake name and fake phone number as a user name username and password, respectively, and adding them to your phone's contacts list. Even someone who thinks to check will have to fish it out of the list of actual contacts, and that's assuming they are able to bypass the phone's own locking measures.



* ''Creator/MarilynMonroe'' was able to do this by [[ClarkKenting changing her posture]]. She was once walking down the street with an interviewer. No one was noticing her, and the reporter was confused by this. She then said, "Want to see her?". She changed the way she walked and gestured, and suddenly people started noticing her.
* [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Puzzlehunt Puzzlehunts]], or "meta puzzles," often work this way. Ostensibly, each individual puzzle--such as a maze, a cryptic crossword, a word search, or some other game--has a commonplace solution. However, the ''true'' goal of the puzzle is to find the "meta-answer," which is hidden somewhere within the solved puzzle itself: for instance, solvers might have to read diagonally down the crossword answers to notice another phrase, or read the first letter of the first answer, second letter of the second, and so on. Truly difficult puzzles can veer into {{Moon Logic|Puzzle}} territory--for instance, recognizing that the apparently decorative cars on a grid are actually symbols in Morse code--but the whole goal is that all of the information you need to find it is right in front of you--it's all a question of knowing how to look at it.

to:

* ''Creator/MarilynMonroe'' was able to do this by [[ClarkKenting changing her posture]]. She was once walking down the street with an interviewer. No one was noticing her, and the reporter was confused by this. She then said, "Want to see her?". her?" She changed the way she walked and gestured, and suddenly people started noticing her.
* [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Puzzlehunt Puzzlehunts]], or "meta puzzles," often work this way. Ostensibly, each individual puzzle--such as a maze, a cryptic crossword, a word search, or some other game--has game --has a commonplace solution. However, the ''true'' goal of the puzzle is to find the "meta-answer," which is hidden somewhere within the solved puzzle itself: for instance, solvers might have to read diagonally down the crossword answers to notice another phrase, or read the first letter of the first answer, second letter of the second, and so on. Truly difficult puzzles can veer into {{Moon Logic|Puzzle}} territory--for territory -- for instance, recognizing that the apparently decorative cars on a grid are actually symbols in Morse code--but code -- but the whole goal is that all of the information you need to find it is right in front of you--it's you -- it's all a question of knowing how to look at it.


* ''Series/GameOfThrones'': How did Ned Stark managed to [[spoiler: hide his nephew Jon -- the son of his sister Lyanna and the last surviving child of Rhaegar Targaryen? By passing him off as his own son and raising him as part of the family]].

to:

* ''Series/GameOfThrones'': How did Ned Stark managed to [[spoiler: hide his nephew Jon -- the son of his sister Lyanna and the last surviving child of Rhaegar Targaryen? By passing him off as his own bastard son and raising him as part of the family]].


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** In episode "Synecdoche", the US President is targeted by American radicals who use their own identities; amateurish yet providing perfect cover as long as no-one realises their group exists.


* A major point of the ''VideoGame/{{Hitman}}'' games is you can disguise yourself [[DevelopersForesight as almost anyone]], giving the option of approaching the target as yourself, [[EtTuBrute his personal guards]], [[TheButlerDidIt or his own butler]]. In game five, ''Absolution'', there's the added ability of hiding with objects to look busy, such as playing with a socket as an electrician or [[DonutMessWithACop hanging around the donut box as a cop]].

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* A major point of the ''VideoGame/{{Hitman}}'' games is you can disguise yourself [[DevelopersForesight as almost anyone]], giving the option of approaching the target as yourself, [[EtTuBrute his personal guards]], [[TheButlerDidIt or his own butler]]. In game five, ''Absolution'', there's ''Absolution'' onwards, you have the added ability of hiding with objects to look busy, such as playing with wiping a socket work surface down as an electrician a kitchen hand, or [[DonutMessWithACop hanging around the donut box as a cop]].

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* In ''Literature/OlliesOdyssey'', Zozo's minions, which are made out of various pieces of scrap, collapse to the ground whenever a human's nearby so they'll be mistaken for piles of junk.

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* In ''Film/BankShot'', the crew hide the [[MonumentalTheft stolen bank]] by painting it pink and parking it in a mobile home park. FBI agents walk past it several times without giving it a second glance.

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