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* It makes lot of sense that many of the DEVTECH heroes look less human as he had picked them from people who simply couldn't adjust due to not being able to pass as non-super physically and had to be kept completely hidden by NSA (which was recently cancelled).

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* When Bob has a late night talk with Violet, he confesses that he's worried that he's letting them all down and that he's a bad father. This is heartbreaking on its own, but he sounds so utterly broken during the entire talk. Then you remember the first film and his reaction to losing his family. He flat out tells Helen that he isn't strong enough to lose his family a second time. And then you realize that part of the reason Bob is so broken is because he's worried that he's failing his family, that he might lose them again. Only this time it won't be because he wasn't a good enough hero. It's because he wasn't a good enough father, and that's even worse.

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** When Bob and Helen meet with Winston, Lucius advises them to wear their old costumes, noting he's a fan of old-school. Given that the Parr's house and the items inside would have been destroyed in explosion in the last film, it makes sense that the old suits would have survived. If Edna designed those suits, she, more than likely, designed them to be indestructible as well.


* Screenslaver's real name: Evelyn Deavor. Evil Endeavor.


* Both films borrow a strong 1960s aesthetic, so it's fitting Bob can't make sense of Dash's math homework: in the 60s, schools tried to implement "New Math" so American students could compete with the Soviets after the launch of Sputnik. Among other annoyances, it asked grade school children to ignore practical maths like arithmetic or multiplication in favor of more complex practices like algebraic inequalities or bases other than 10. Music/TomLehrer even had a whole song mocking it, and he'd have every right since he was a mathematician. Dash's textbook "New Math for Life" even serves as an inside joke, because New Math was quickly abandoned when teachers, parents, and students alike all found it too frustrating and impractical.

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* Both films borrow a strong 1960s aesthetic, so it's fitting Bob can't make sense of Dash's math homework: in the 60s, schools tried to implement "New Math" so American students could compete with the Soviets after the launch of Sputnik. Among other annoyances, it asked grade school children to ignore practical maths math like arithmetic or multiplication in favor of more complex practices like algebraic inequalities or bases other than 10. Music/TomLehrer even had a whole song mocking it, and he'd have every right since he was a mathematician. Dash's textbook "New Math for Life" even serves as an inside joke, because New Math was quickly abandoned when teachers, parents, and students alike all found it too frustrating and impractical.



* Speaking of Edna’s NighInvulnerable supersuits, Elastigirl’s new suit gets torn in the climax of the story. The designer was never concerned about making a really good supersuit.

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* Speaking of Edna’s NighInvulnerable supersuits, Elastigirl’s Elastigirl's new suit gets torn in the climax of the story. The designer was never concerned about making a really good supersuit.



*** The fact that he doesn't put the phones in the panic room reveal that the phones weren't for his protection, but for his prestige. He was using the phones to show off his connections. He didn't worship superheroes because they were doing good; he worshipped the power and fame they represented.

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*** The fact that he doesn't put the phones in the panic room reveal that the phones weren't for his protection, but for his prestige. He was using the phones to show off his connections. He didn't worship superheroes because they were doing good; he worshipped worshiped the power and fame they represented.



* When Elasti-Girl tries to break into Screenslaver's apartment and we see them standing just next to the door waiting for her we just assume it's because they're that CrazyPrepared. It's actually because Evelyn is the real Screenslaver and she's sending Elasti-Girl there purposely.

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* When Elasti-Girl Elastigirl tries to break into Screenslaver's apartment and we see them standing just next to the door waiting for her we just assume it's because they're that CrazyPrepared. It's actually because Evelyn is the real Screenslaver and she's sending Elasti-Girl Elastigirl there purposely.



* This film has a HistoryRepeats theme. Back in the first movie, Mr. Incredible stopped a train and caused the start of the superhero relocation act. Elasti-Girl also stops a train and it starts the repealing of said act. Syndrome and Screenslaver both attempt to take down heroes with their super tech. And when faced with disaster, the Deavors split their opinion on how to handle it: either protecting themselves and dismissing
the heroes, or putting their faith in the heroes to help protect them.
* When Elasti-Girl meets the Ambassador, she says, "Bring... lasting peace!" Clearly, she's joked "Bring bacon!" to Bob so many times that it's gotten stuck in her head as her general-purpose good luck/"break a leg" affirmation. The habit is so ingrained that she actually got the first word out before stumbling when she realized it wasn't an appropriate sentiment for an Ambassador, and had to hastily came up with a different way to finish it.

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* This film has a HistoryRepeats theme. Back in the first movie, Mr. Incredible stopped a train and caused the start of the superhero relocation act. Elasti-Girl Elastigirl also stops a train and it starts the repealing of said act. Syndrome and Screenslaver both attempt to take down heroes with their super tech. And when faced with disaster, the Deavors split their opinion on how to handle it: either protecting themselves and dismissing
dismissing the heroes, or putting their faith in the heroes to help protect them.
* When Elasti-Girl Elastigirl meets the Ambassador, she says, "Bring... lasting peace!" Clearly, she's joked "Bring bacon!" to Bob so many times that it's gotten stuck in her head as her general-purpose good luck/"break a leg" affirmation. The habit is so ingrained that she actually got the first word out before stumbling when she realized it wasn't an appropriate sentiment for an Ambassador, and had to hastily came up with a different way to finish it.



* The second movie ends the way the first movie began: with an innocuous vehicle transforming into pursuit mode to go after a car full of crooks. Symbolically, this bookending demonstrates they've come full circle: "the Glory Days" are here again, but this time it's for the whole family, not just Mr. Incredible.

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* The second movie ends the way the first movie began: with an innocuous vehicle transforming into pursuit mode to go after a car full of crooks. Symbolically, this bookending bookend demonstrates they've come full circle: "the Glory Days" are here again, but this time it's for the whole family, not just Mr. Incredible.



* When Elasti-Girl decides to save Screenslaver's life despite everything they had done, it subtly proves a larger point: all of Screenslaver's "ideas" are basically negatives; they claim to want to make the world a better place, but only by taking superheroes ''away'' from it, not by adding anything better to it. And her plan to do this is by crashing a ship into a city and potentially killing people, and framing superheroes for it. So the main difference between Elasti-Girl and Screenslaver is that Elasti-Girl wants to make the world a better place by ''doing positive things'', like saving people's lives. Meanwhile, Screenslaver's plan to make the world a better place is just one long attack on what she ''hates'', without really helping any innocent people in the process (and indeed putting them in danger).

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* When Elasti-Girl Elastigirl decides to save Screenslaver's life despite everything they had done, it subtly proves a larger point: all of Screenslaver's "ideas" are basically negatives; they claim to want to make the world a better place, but only by taking superheroes ''away'' from it, not by adding anything better to it. And her plan to do this is by crashing a ship into a city and potentially killing people, and framing superheroes for it. So the main difference between Elasti-Girl Elastigirl and Screenslaver is that Elasti-Girl Elastigirl wants to make the world a better place by ''doing positive things'', like saving people's lives. Meanwhile, Screenslaver's plan to make the world a better place is just one long attack on what she ''hates'', without really helping any innocent people in the process (and indeed putting them in danger).



* Screenslaver’s motive in the Film is that they think people rely too much on Supers to fix all their problems. However, across the course of the film, we see many an occasion where people are shown to be able to help themselves, but the circumstances prevent them from doing so. Cases in point are; with the Hover Train, Elasti-Girl suggests trying to shut the train down using over rides or fail safes, but she is told that they have already tried that and not only were they locked out of the system (by Screenslaver!), but there was also no time to do the fail safes; when Elasti-Girl rescues the ambassador, she checks if every one on the helicopter could swim, then pushes those who can safely in to a river, and rescues the ambassador, who cannot swim; when the Ever-Just is out of control, Robert tries to get to the Engine Room, to shut it down from there, however, cause of Krushauer, under Screenslaver’s control, the way to the engine room is blocked. Despite what Screenslaver claims, the film shows numerous examples of how normal people are able to help themselves, [[NiceJobFixingItVillain but as long as there are Villains like Screenslaver who prevent them from doing so, there shall be a need for Supers]].

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* Screenslaver’s Screenslaver's motive in the Film is that they think people rely too much on Supers to fix all their problems. However, across the course of the film, we see many an occasion where people are shown to be able to help themselves, but the circumstances prevent them from doing so. Cases in point are; with the Hover Train, Elasti-Girl Elastigirl suggests trying to shut the train down using over rides or fail safes, but she is told that they have already tried that and not only were they locked out of the system (by Screenslaver!), but there was also no time to do the fail safes; when Elasti-Girl Elastigirl rescues the ambassador, she checks if every one on the helicopter could swim, then pushes those who can safely in to a river, and rescues the ambassador, who cannot swim; when the Ever-Just is out of control, Robert tries to get to the Engine Room, to shut it down from there, however, cause of Krushauer, under Screenslaver’s Screenslaver's control, the way to the engine room is blocked. Despite what Screenslaver claims, the film shows numerous examples of how normal people are able to help themselves, [[NiceJobFixingItVillain but as long as there are Villains like Screenslaver who prevent them from doing so, there shall be a need for Supers]].



* At first glance Elasti-Girl riding a motorcycle without a helmet seems really dangerous (if more photogenic). But then you remember that her whole body is...well, elastic. Blunt force impacts would be almost useless against her. Thus any impact a helmet would be enough to protect her from would be one she would not need to worry about anyway, so she never bothered. ''Double'' fridge brilliance as many advocates for altering helmet laws point out that due to interference with hearing and peripheral vision, many kinds of helmets make it impossible to pass a driver's test; she regularly ''[[MultiTrackDrifting drives on rooftops and walls]]'' -- sometimes '''[[UpToEleven at the same time]]''' -- so she needs all the awareness she can get.

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* At first glance Elasti-Girl Elastigirl riding a motorcycle without a helmet seems really dangerous (if (albeit more photogenic). But then you remember that her whole body is...well, elastic. Blunt force impacts would be almost useless against her. Thus any impact a helmet would be enough to protect her from would be one she would not need wouldn't have to worry about anyway, so she never bothered. ''Double'' fridge brilliance as many advocates for altering helmet laws point out that due to interference with hearing and peripheral vision, many kinds of helmets make it impossible to pass a driver's test; she regularly ''[[MultiTrackDrifting drives on rooftops and walls]]'' -- sometimes '''[[UpToEleven at the same time]]''' -- so she needs all the awareness she can get.



* A number of the new heroes Devtech introduces to Elastigirl or who escort their diplomats on the Everjust include capes as part of their outfits. But then, with superheroes being underground, Edna Mode's "No capes!" dictat wouldn't have been widely disseminated, so they don't know any better.
* Screenslaver appears to be a {{Foil}} to Syndrome in certain ways. Winston shares the superhero fanboyism, but Evelyn is a talented engineer. However, she wants to destroy supers entirely, while Syndrome wanted to KillAndReplace. Ol' Buddy was theatrical and costumed and studied and wanted the spotlight, while Screenslaver wears messy, casual clothing whenever they're not appearing on a screen and stays in the shadows. Syndrome played on Mr. Incredible's insecurities as a father and former hero to hire him, while Screenslaver tries to play up the "man's world" angle, which...doesn't really work so well, because Helen is more secure than Bob. Syndrome is a PsychopathicManchild, while Screenslaver borders on TheSociopath. Syndrome's plan focused on creating a FalseFlagOperation with a hero-killer bot and saving the day, while Screenslaver wants to do the same with heroes in order to doom them out of simple revenge. Syndrome hires employees, while Screenslavers mind-controls enemies into being minions. Finally, Buddy's failure as Incredi-Boy led to events that started the SuperheroRegistrationAct. Evelyn's failure as Screenslaver ''ended'' the SuperheroRegistrationAct.

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* A number of the new heroes Devtech introduces to Elastigirl or who escort their diplomats on the Everjust Ever-Just include capes as part of their outfits. But then, with superheroes being underground, Edna Mode's "No capes!" dictat motto wouldn't have been widely disseminated, so they don't know any better.
* Screenslaver appears to be a {{Foil}} to Syndrome in certain ways. Winston shares the superhero fanboyism, fanboy-ism, but Evelyn is a talented engineer. However, she wants to destroy supers entirely, while Syndrome wanted to KillAndReplace. Ol' Buddy was theatrical and costumed and studied and wanted the spotlight, while Screenslaver wears messy, casual clothing whenever they're not appearing on a screen and stays in the shadows. Syndrome played on Mr. Incredible's insecurities as a father and former hero to hire him, while Screenslaver tries to play up the "man's world" angle, which...doesn't really work so well, because Helen is more secure than Bob. Syndrome is a PsychopathicManchild, while Screenslaver borders on TheSociopath. Syndrome's plan focused on creating a FalseFlagOperation with a hero-killer bot and saving the day, while Screenslaver wants to do the same with heroes in order to doom them out of simple revenge. Syndrome hires employees, while Screenslavers Screenslaver's mind-controls enemies into being minions. Finally, Buddy's failure as Incredi-Boy led to events that started the SuperheroRegistrationAct. Evelyn's failure as Screenslaver ''ended'' the SuperheroRegistrationAct.



** There's also a noticeable {{Foil}} between how Helen and Evelyn dealt with their respective tragedies. Losing the chance to be a superhero must've been a devastating blow to someone like Elasti-Girl, who never dreamed of trading in her superheroics for a normal life. But if it's any indication, she learned to work through it, and even [[BecameTheirOwnAntithesis became a good mother and home maker]]. Evelyn lost her father to a pointless robbery (and then her mother died of heartbreak) and that's nothing to sneeze at. Her scheme to rid the world of superheroes speaks volumes of how she never moved on from her tragedy.
* Winston in some manners, also works as a foil to Syndrome, too. Some people bring up how Syndrome can be seen as an example of toxic fandom. With Syndrome, he has a sense of entitlement, gets angry when heroes do not act to his expectations and is willing to burn it all down for perceived slights. Winston Deavor, on the other hand, can be seen as an example of positive fandom! Whilst nostalgic, Winston understands the need to modernise and fix the things which caused issues before. He leads his life by the heroes’ example, shown when he puts his own safety at risk to rescue the ambassadors and other supers from Screenslaver’s hypnosis. So, while Syndrome shows an example of toxic fandom, by lashing out at the very thing he claims to be a fan of; Winston presents a positive example of fandom, who is inspired by what he loves and tries to make the world a better place because of this love.
* With the way that the "Mr. Incredible" theme as featured in the end titles includes the "Glory Days" leitmotif in its instrumental section, it suddenly makes sense why Robert would be humming that tune as he returns from a night's illicit superheroing work in ''WesternAnimation/TheIncredibles''. He's not actually humming the ''movie's'' theme song, he's humming ''his own'' superheroing theme song.

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** There's also a noticeable {{Foil}} between how Helen and Evelyn dealt with their respective tragedies. Losing the chance to be a superhero must've been a devastating blow to someone like Elasti-Girl, Elastigirl, who never dreamed of trading in her superheroics for a normal life. But if it's any indication, she learned to work through it, and even [[BecameTheirOwnAntithesis became a good mother and home maker]]. Evelyn lost her father to a pointless robbery (and then her mother died of heartbreak) and that's nothing to sneeze at. Her scheme to rid the world of superheroes speaks volumes of how she never moved on from her tragedy.
* Winston in some manners, also works as a foil to Syndrome, too. Some people bring up how Syndrome can be seen as an example of toxic fandom. With Syndrome, he has a sense of entitlement, gets angry when heroes do not act to his expectations and is willing to burn it all down for perceived slights. Winston Deavor, on the other hand, can be seen as an example of positive fandom! Whilst nostalgic, Winston understands the need to modernise modernize and fix the things which caused issues before. He leads his life by the heroes’ example, shown when he puts his own safety at risk to rescue the ambassadors and other supers from Screenslaver’s Screenslaver's hypnosis. So, while Syndrome shows an example of toxic fandom, by lashing out at the very thing he claims to be a fan of; Winston presents a positive example of fandom, who is inspired by what he loves and tries to make the world a better place because of this love.
* With the way that the "Mr. Incredible" theme as featured in the end titles includes the "Glory Days" leitmotif in its instrumental section, it suddenly makes sense why Robert would be humming that tune as he returns from a night's illicit superheroing superhero work in ''WesternAnimation/TheIncredibles''. He's not actually humming the ''movie's'' theme song, he's humming ''his own'' superheroing superhero theme song.



* When Chad was remotely interviewing Helen, he talked about being mind-controlled on television, and the whole public heard him describe how even after seeing a recording of his Screenslaver-induced monologue, he had no recollection of it whatsoever. This is likely why there was no lasting impact from Frozone, Mr. Incredible, and Elasti-Girl's mind-controlled monologue on the Ever-Just - everyone already knew that mind-control existed, and had seen it in action once before.

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* When Chad was remotely interviewing Helen, he talked about being mind-controlled on television, and the whole public heard him describe how even after seeing a recording of his Screenslaver-induced monologue, he had no recollection of it whatsoever. This is likely why there was no lasting impact from Frozone, Mr. Incredible, and Elasti-Girl's Elastigirl's mind-controlled monologue on the Ever-Just - everyone already knew that mind-control existed, existed and had seen it in action once before.



** The ''offness'' of the mind-controlled superheroes acting evil is even more obvious if the public expects villains to be [[LargeHam bombastic]] and [[EvilGloating boastful]] like Syndrome and the Underminer.

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** The ''offness'' ''off-ness'' of the mind-controlled superheroes acting evil is even more obvious if the public expects villains to be [[LargeHam bombastic]] and [[EvilGloating boastful]] like Syndrome and the Underminer.



** It might also explain how they seem to have such highly developed tech despite being "only" in the 1960s. Much like Edna was able to create so much stuff just by studying Jack Jack, most likely the last several decades of technology have benefitted from having all these randomly super-powered people around to study for deeper or more creative understandings of physics.

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** It might also explain how they seem to have such highly developed tech despite being "only" in the 1960s. Much like Edna was able to create so much stuff just by studying Jack Jack, most likely the last several decades of technology have benefitted benefited from having all these randomly super-powered people around to study for deeper or more creative understandings of physics.



* If Screenslaver’s plan had worked would the government have simply refused to bring back Superheroes? Or would they have taken it a step further and gone the way of [[ComicBook/XMen Bolivar]] [[Film/XMenDaysOfFuturePast Trask]]?

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* If Screenslaver’s Screenslaver's plan had worked worked, would the government have simply refused to bring back Superheroes? Or would they have taken it a step further and gone the way of [[ComicBook/XMen Bolivar]] [[Film/XMenDaysOfFuturePast Trask]]?



* Breaking eye-contact with the Screenslaver’s screens is enough to knock a person out of their trance. Considering that, the Screenslaver’s control could conceivably be undermined with something as simple as a blink. Considering that people in Screenslaver trances ‘’don’t’’ blink, it would imply that Screenslaver has thought of this and uses the hypnosis to also keep her victims from blinking. The problem is that blinking serves a very important biological function for the human eyes, keeping them moisturized. So Screenslaver keeping her victims under control for extended periods of time could lead to some serious vision issues, depending how long they’re left under the mind-control.

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* Breaking eye-contact with the Screenslaver’s Screenslaver's screens is enough to knock a person out of their trance. Considering that, the Screenslaver’s Screenslaver's control could conceivably be undermined with something as simple as a blink. Considering that people in Screenslaver trances ‘’don’t’’ ''don't'' blink, it would imply that Screenslaver has thought of this and uses the hypnosis to also keep her victims from blinking. The problem is that blinking serves a very important biological function for the human eyes, keeping them moisturized. So Screenslaver keeping her victims under control for extended periods of time could lead to some serious vision issues, depending how long they’re left under the mind-control.

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* When Bob and Helen wear their old costumes when going to visit Deavor, one can't help but wonder how their old costumes had survived the house blowing up in the first film since it was mentioned everything else in the house was incinerated, until you realize that Edna created those as well, and like the current ones, probably designed them to be indestructible.


** There could be another reason for the supers powers: [[MST3KMantra it's a]] [[{{Creator/Pixar}} Pixar film]]. There was no [=WW2=] attempt to create people with powers. [[AWizardDidIt It's just people with magic]], like [[{{Film/Frozen}} Elsa from Frozen]]. And when you take the Pixar theory into the mix, this would explain why people are blase with people with powers, as magic and other powers are a common occurrence in their world.


** Another reason why people would have superpowers in this film with no given explanation? Well the answer is quite simple: [[MST3KMantra it's a]] [[{{Creator/Pixar}} Pixar film]]. There was no [=WW2=] attempt to create people with powers. [[AWizardDidIt It's just people with magic]], like [[{{Film/Frozen}} Elsa from Frozen]]. And when you take the Pixar theory into the mix...

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** Another There could be another reason why people would have superpowers in this film with no given explanation? Well for the answer is quite simple: supers powers: [[MST3KMantra it's a]] [[{{Creator/Pixar}} Pixar film]]. There was no [=WW2=] attempt to create people with powers. [[AWizardDidIt It's just people with magic]], like [[{{Film/Frozen}} Elsa from Frozen]]. And when you take the Pixar theory into the mix...mix, this would explain why people are blase with people with powers, as magic and other powers are a common occurrence in their world.


** Another reason why people would have superpowers in this film with no given explanation? Well the answer is quite simple: [[MST3KMantra it's a]] [[{{Creator/Pixar}} Pixar film]]. There was no WWX attempt to create people with powers. [[AWizardDidIt It's just people with magic]], like [[{{Film/Frozen}} Elsa from Frozen]]. And when you take the Pixar theory into the mix...

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** Another reason why people would have superpowers in this film with no given explanation? Well the answer is quite simple: [[MST3KMantra it's a]] [[{{Creator/Pixar}} Pixar film]]. There was no WWX [=WW2=] attempt to create people with powers. [[AWizardDidIt It's just people with magic]], like [[{{Film/Frozen}} Elsa from Frozen]]. And when you take the Pixar theory into the mix...


** This seems pretty unlikely considering the foreign superheroes in this film, and the fact that in the comics there is a villain called Xerek who has the power to always win, has lived for 200 years. Alternatively...

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** This seems pretty unlikely considering the foreign superheroes in this film, and the fact that in the comics there is a villain called Xerek who has the power to always win, has lived for 200 years. Alternatively...However...
** Another reason why people would have superpowers in this film with no given explanation? Well the answer is quite simple: [[MST3KMantra it's a]] [[{{Creator/Pixar}} Pixar film]]. There was no WWX attempt to create people with powers. [[AWizardDidIt It's just people with magic]], like [[{{Film/Frozen}} Elsa from Frozen]]. And when you take the Pixar theory into the mix...


* Another reason why people would have superpowers in this film with no given explanation? Well the answer is quite simple: [[MST3KMantra it's a]] [[{{Creator/Pixar}} Pixar film]]. There was no WWX attempt to create people with powers. [[AWizardDidIt It's just people with magic]], like [[{{Film/Frozen}} Elsa from Frozen]]. And when you take the Pixar theory into the mix...


* Another reason why people would have superpowers in this film with no given explanation? Well the answer is quite simple: [[MST3KMantra it's a]] [[{{Creator/Pixar}} Pixar film]]. There's no WWX attempt to create people with powers. [[AWizardDidIt It's just people with magic]], like [[{{Film/Frozen}} Elsa from Frozen]]. And when you take the Pixar theory into the mix...

to:

* Another reason why people would have superpowers in this film with no given explanation? Well the answer is quite simple: [[MST3KMantra it's a]] [[{{Creator/Pixar}} Pixar film]]. There's There was no WWX attempt to create people with powers. [[AWizardDidIt It's just people with magic]], like [[{{Film/Frozen}} Elsa from Frozen]]. And when you take the Pixar theory into the mix...


* Another reason why people would have superpowers in this film with no given explanation? Well the answer is quite simple: [[MST3KMantra it's a]] [[{{Creator/Pixar}} film]]. There's no WWX attempt to create people with powers. [[AWizardDidIt It's just people with magic]], like [[{{Film/Frozen}} Elsa from Frozen]]. And when you take the Pixar theory into the mix...

to:

* Another reason why people would have superpowers in this film with no given explanation? Well the answer is quite simple: [[MST3KMantra it's a]] [[{{Creator/Pixar}} Pixar film]]. There's no WWX attempt to create people with powers. [[AWizardDidIt It's just people with magic]], like [[{{Film/Frozen}} Elsa from Frozen]]. And when you take the Pixar theory into the mix...


* Another reason why people would have superpowers in this film with no given explanation? Well the answer is quite simple: it's a {{Creator/Pixar}} film. There's no WWX attempt to create people with powers. [[AWizardDidIt It's just people with magic]], like [[{{Film/Frozen}} Elsa from Frozen]]. And when you take the Pixar theory into the mix...

to:

* Another reason why people would have superpowers in this film with no given explanation? Well the answer is quite simple: [[MST3KMantra it's a {{Creator/Pixar}} film.a]] [[{{Creator/Pixar}} film]]. There's no WWX attempt to create people with powers. [[AWizardDidIt It's just people with magic]], like [[{{Film/Frozen}} Elsa from Frozen]]. And when you take the Pixar theory into the mix...


* Another reason why people would have superpowers in this film with no given explanation? Well the answer is quite simple: it's a {{Creator/Pixar}} film. There's no WWX attempt to create people with powers. [[AWizardDidIt It's just people with magic]], like [[{{Film/Frozen}} Elsa from]]. And when you take the Pixar theory into the mix...

to:

* Another reason why people would have superpowers in this film with no given explanation? Well the answer is quite simple: it's a {{Creator/Pixar}} film. There's no WWX attempt to create people with powers. [[AWizardDidIt It's just people with magic]], like [[{{Film/Frozen}} Elsa from]].from Frozen]]. And when you take the Pixar theory into the mix...

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