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* The ComicBook/SuicideSquad and the ComicBook/{{Thunderbolts}}. Both are teams that are a mixture of antiheroes, antivillains and just plain villains. This has become more evident over time as the Thunderbolts are often depicted as being a team for supervillains seeking redemption with the occasional TokenEvilTeammate.

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* The ComicBook/SuicideSquad and the ComicBook/{{Thunderbolts}}. Both are teams that are a mixture of antiheroes, antivillains and just plain villains. This has become more evident over time as the Thunderbolts are often depicted as being a team for supervillains seeking redemption with the occasional TokenEvilTeammate.

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** Both Spider-Man and the Flash also have an Australian villain who fights using tricked-out boomerangs (Boomerang and Captain Boomerang respectively).


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* [[ComicBook/CaptainAtom Wade Eiling]] and [[ComicBook/RedHulk Thaddeus "Thunderbolt" Ross]]. Both are GeneralRipper characters who serve an antagonistic role to superheroes whose origins involve [[ILoveNuclearPower nuclear power]]. Ross's transformation into the Red Hulk also mirrors Eiling's becoming the Shaggy Man.
* The ComicBook/SuicideSquad and the ComicBook/{{Thunderbolts}}. Both are teams that are a mixture of antiheroes, antivillains and just plain villains. This has become more evident over time as the Thunderbolts are often depicted as being a team for supervillains seeking redemption with the occasional TokenEvilTeammate.


* The Kate Spencer iteration of ComicBook/{{Manhunter}} can be seen as DC's answer to Marvel's ComicBook/{[Daredevil}}. Like Matt, Kate is a practicing lawyer who moonlights as a vigilante in [[RedIsHeroic red]], fights with a staff weapon and has a tragic personal life.

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* The Kate Spencer iteration of ComicBook/{{Manhunter}} can be seen as DC's answer to Marvel's ComicBook/{[Daredevil}}.ComicBook/{{Daredevil}}. Like Matt, Kate is a practicing lawyer who moonlights as a vigilante in [[RedIsHeroic red]], fights with a staff weapon and has a tragic personal life.


* Though she didn't start out this way, Wanda Maximoff aka ComicBook/ScarletWitch has since become the Marvel equivalent to DC's ComicBook/{{Zatanna}}, as both are [[HotWitch beautiful]] [[sorceresses LadyOfBlackMagic]] who are the main mage characters of their [[ComicBook/TheAvengers respective]] [[Franchise/JusticeLeagueOfAmerica teams]]. Originally, Scarlet Witch had the power to [[WindsOfDestinyChange alter probability]] before Creator/KurtBusiek re-wrote her as having the natural ability to control chaos magic, similar to how Zatanna can naturally control magic due to being a [[WitchSpecies Homo Magi]]. Wanda's 2016 solo series reveals that she inherited her mystical abilities from her mother just as Zatanna inherited her magic from her mother.

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* Though she didn't start out this way, Wanda Maximoff aka ComicBook/ScarletWitch has since become the Marvel equivalent to DC's ComicBook/{{Zatanna}}, as both are [[HotWitch beautiful]] [[sorceresses LadyOfBlackMagic]] [[LadyOfBlackMagic sorceresses]] who are the main mage characters of their [[ComicBook/TheAvengers respective]] [[Franchise/JusticeLeagueOfAmerica teams]]. Originally, Scarlet Witch had the power to [[WindsOfDestinyChange alter probability]] before Creator/KurtBusiek re-wrote her as having the natural ability to control chaos magic, similar to how Zatanna can naturally control magic due to being a [[WitchSpecies Homo Magi]]. Wanda's 2016 solo series reveals that she inherited her mystical abilities from her mother just as Zatanna inherited her magic from her mother.


* G. Gordon Godfrey plays a similar role in the DC Universe as J. Jonah Jameson does in the Marvel Universe, even having a similar alliterative name. He's an obnoxious public figure with an obsessive hatred of meta-humans, who uses his platform to spread a smear campaign and turn the public against them. in Jameson's case it's [[Franchise/SpiderMan one particular meta-human]] that ruffles his feathers, though he occasionally shows hatred towards all of them, DependingOnTheWriter. One main difference is that Godfrey does it to help ComicBook/{{Darkseid}} undermine Earth's heroes, whereas Jameson does it simply out of petty, IrrationalHatred.

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* G. Gordon Godfrey plays a similar role in the DC Universe as J. Jonah Jameson does in the Marvel Universe, even having a similar alliterative name. He's an obnoxious public figure with an obsessive hatred of meta-humans, who uses his platform to spread a smear campaign and turn the public against them. in In Jameson's case it's [[Franchise/SpiderMan one particular meta-human]] that ruffles his feathers, though he occasionally shows hatred towards all of them, DependingOnTheWriter. One main difference is that Godfrey does it to help ComicBook/{{Darkseid}} undermine Earth's heroes, whereas Jameson does it simply out of petty, IrrationalHatred.


** Neron, a villain introduced during DC's Underworld Unleashed event, is another ACE to Mephisto as both are demons whose modus operandi is to [[DevilsDeal make deals]].

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** Neron, a villain introduced during DC's Underworld Unleashed event, is another ACE to Mephisto as both are demons whose modus operandi is to [[DevilsDeal [[DealWithTheDevil make deals]].


* ComicBook/{{Raven}} from ''Franchise/TeenTitans'' and Magik from ''Franchise/XMen'' are seen as this to each other, one being a daughter of demon Trigon, who rules a hell-like dimension, while other has been kidnapped to a hell-like dimension and raised by a demon ruling it, Belasco. Made even more apparent when Marvel decided to redesign Magik to make her look more {{Goth}}, like Raven. ''ComicBook/AlphaFlight'' character Witchfire is a clear {{Expy}} of Raven as well, up to being a daughter of Belasco. Rumor is her creator wanted to write a Raven-like character and couldn't use Magik. In later years Marvel made Witchfire into a villain, while also redesigning so that sometimes she looks like an outright PaletteSwap of Raven.

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* ComicBook/{{Raven}} from ''Franchise/TeenTitans'' and Magik from ''Franchise/XMen'' are seen as this to each other, one being a daughter of demon Trigon, who rules a hell-like dimension, while the other has been kidnapped to a hell-like dimension and raised by a demon ruling it, Belasco. Made even more apparent when Marvel decided to redesign Magik to make her look more {{Goth}}, like Raven. ''ComicBook/AlphaFlight'' character Witchfire is a clear {{Expy}} of Raven as well, up to being a daughter of Belasco. Rumor is her creator wanted to write a Raven-like character and couldn't use Magik. In later years Marvel made Witchfire into a villain, while also redesigning so that sometimes she looks like an outright PaletteSwap of Raven.


** Damage could also be seen as DC's equivalent to Marvel's latest addition to Hulk family - Weapon H. They are both gray, Hulk-like monsters whose stories are supposed to be throwbacks to old-school Hulk stories. in addition, while Damage has been said to look like an DarkerAndEdgier Hulk, Weapon H has been said to look like a more realistic Doomsday.

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** Damage could also be seen as DC's equivalent to Marvel's latest addition to the Hulk family - Weapon H. They are both gray, Hulk-like monsters whose stories are supposed to be throwbacks to old-school Hulk stories. in addition, while Damage has been said to look like an DarkerAndEdgier Hulk, Weapon H has been said to look like a more realistic Doomsday.


* ''Creator/WildStorm'', after being bought by DC, and ''ComicBook/UltimateMarvel''. Both were publishing lines set in parallel Universes to main DC and Marvel worlds, intended to be completely separate from them (which in both cases didn't stick). During TurnOfTheMillennium they were places of DarkerAndEdgier, modernized superhero stories that became influential on the superhero mainstream as a whole. However, as more comics from main DC and Marvel Universes took clues from Wildstorm and Ultimate, their novelty started to disappear. Attempts at shaking the status quo with big, apocalyptic events didn't help and finally, both lines were closed and both Universes erased, with more popular characters joining respective "prime" Universe.

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* ''Creator/WildStorm'', after being bought by DC, and ''ComicBook/UltimateMarvel''. Both were publishing lines set in parallel Universes to main DC and Marvel worlds, intended to be completely separate from them (which in both cases didn't stick). During TurnOfTheMillennium they were places of DarkerAndEdgier, modernized superhero stories that became influential on the superhero mainstream as a whole. However, as more comics from main DC and Marvel Universes took clues from Wildstorm and Ultimate, their novelty started to disappear. Attempts at shaking the status quo with big, apocalyptic events didn't help and finally, both lines were closed and both Universes erased, with more popular characters joining their respective "prime" Universe.


* ComicBook/Checkmate can be seen as DC's answer to Marvel's SHIELD.

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* ComicBook/Checkmate ComicBook/{{Checkmate}} can be seen as DC's answer to Marvel's SHIELD.


* Marvel's ComicBook/TheVision and DC's ComicBook/RedTornado is an interesting situation. Not only are they the premier android heroes of the Avengers and Justice League and often the subject of stories dealing with WhatMeasureIsANonHuman themes, they are both re-imaginations of obscure golden age characters and originally created by vilans to destroy the league/avengers only to make a HeelFaceTurn. The fact they only debuted about a month from each other (too soon for they're similarities to be anything but a coincidence) makes it even more astounding.

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* Marvel's ComicBook/TheVision and DC's ComicBook/RedTornado is an interesting situation. Not only are they the premier android heroes of the Avengers and Justice League and often the subject of stories dealing with WhatMeasureIsANonHuman themes, they are both re-imaginations of obscure golden age characters and originally created by vilans to destroy the league/avengers only to make a HeelFaceTurn. The fact they only debuted about a month from each other (too soon for they're their similarities to be anything but a coincidence) makes it even more astounding.


* As a SmallStepsHero worried and committed to their city, Spider-Man also echoes Batman. Most notably, the fact that Spider-Man is a grappling, swinging, roofhopping and parkouring hero, long before Batman started doing that (his grappling hook comes from the Tim Burton movie). In a case of RecursiveAdaptation, the 90's cartoon ''WesternAnimation/BatmanBeyond'' made Bruce's LegacyCharacter Terry [=McGinnis=] into a Peter Parker-style hero (guilt over parental figure's death, need to atone, having an on-off long-term relationship with an outgoing party girl) which in turn led back to more modernized versions such as ''Film/SpidermanHomecoming'' (where Peter much like Terry is patronized by an older superhero in his case Tony Stark). [[ComicBook/SpiderMan2099]] can also be viewed as an ACE to Terry as both are legacy characters created in the 90s whose stories take place in cyberpunk futures. Though Terry debuted in a cartoon while Miguel is from the comics.

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* As a SmallStepsHero worried and committed to their city, Spider-Man also echoes Batman. Most notably, the fact that Spider-Man is a grappling, swinging, roofhopping and parkouring hero, long before Batman started doing that (his grappling hook comes from the Tim Burton movie). Another similarity between them is that they're both motivated by the loss of parental figures at the hands of criminals. Like Batman, Spider-Man also has an animal motif (and both spiders and bats are often seen as scary). In a case of RecursiveAdaptation, the 90's cartoon ''WesternAnimation/BatmanBeyond'' made Bruce's LegacyCharacter Terry [=McGinnis=] into a Peter Parker-style hero (guilt over parental figure's death, need to atone, having an on-off long-term relationship with an outgoing party girl) which in turn led back to more modernized versions such as ''Film/SpidermanHomecoming'' (where Peter much like Terry is patronized by an older superhero in his case Tony Stark). [[ComicBook/SpiderMan2099]] ComicBook/SpiderMan2099 can also be viewed as an ACE to Terry as both are legacy characters created in the 90s whose stories take place in cyberpunk futures. Though Terry debuted in a cartoon while Miguel is from the comics.


* Comicbook/TheIncredibleHulk is the WorldsStrongestMan, the same status Superman has in DC. The two of them were pitted against each other in the ''Marvel vs DC'' crossover, and there was even a ''The Incredible Hulk vs. Superman'' one-shot crossover in the late 90's. Some of Superman's more modern takes, namely his fears that he lives in a world made of cardboard and has to constantly hold back rather than let lose can be sourced in Bruce Banner[=/=]The Hulk's fears about his powers. Recent takes which include Lois Lane's crazy general dad Sam Lane is more less taking Bruce and Betty and Thunderbolt Ross's dynamic and giving it to Clark Kent.

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* Comicbook/TheIncredibleHulk is the WorldsStrongestMan, the same status Superman has in DC. Although the idea is executed differently for each hero, both have a duality between a shy, nerdy civilian identity and a super strong hero persona. The two of them were pitted against each other in the ''Marvel vs DC'' crossover, and there was even a ''The Incredible Hulk vs. Superman'' one-shot crossover in the late 90's. Some of Superman's more modern takes, namely his fears that he lives in a world made of cardboard and has to constantly hold back rather than let lose can be sourced in Bruce Banner[=/=]The Hulk's fears about his powers. Recent takes which include Lois Lane's crazy general dad Sam Lane is more less taking Bruce and Betty and Thunderbolt Ross's dynamic and giving it to Clark Kent.

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* Ever since his resurrection and reinvention as the gun-wielding vigilante who clashes with other heroes, Jason Todd has pretty been DC's equivalent to the Punisher.

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* The Kate Spencer iteration of ComicBook/{{Manhunter}} can be seen as DC's answer to Marvel's ComicBook/{[Daredevil}}. Like Matt, Kate is a practicing lawyer who moonlights as a vigilante in [[RedIsHeroic red]], fights with a staff weapon and has a tragic personal life.

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