YMMV / Doc Savage

  • Base Breaker: Pat Savage can be somewhat divisive to some fans, especially in her older stuff.
    • On the one hand, she was a brave, adventurous young woman who was legitimately capable of not only holding her own in a fight, but was a better shot than pretty much anyone short of Doc himself. In an age where such women were almost non-existant, Pat stood out as girl who is more legitimate Action Girl than Faux Action Girl, even if she did need rescuing as often as she did the rescuing. Her love of adventure, go-getter attitude, general fearlessness wit and described beauty made her popular with a lot of fans.
    • On the other hand, she can come off as incredibly selfish, even spoiled, inserting herself into Doc's adventures expressly against his wishes, and becomes extremely petulant when he tries to keep her out of them. While Doc and his men do what they do out of a sense of altruism, Pat is motivated solely by the thrill of excitement and danger. She hasn't had the training Doc and his men have had, hasn't been through war like they have, and doesn't understand the dangers of their lives, nor does she have the legal authority Doc has due to his honorary law enforcement positions around the world. She is basically the kind of scrappy kid r you'd see in an 80's action cartoon trying to tag along on missions with the hero, and who gets away with it due to being a hot girl instead of a bratty pre-teen.
  • Fridge Logic: Didn't Adolf Hitler in disguise hit on you at the start of this adventure?
  • Older Than They Think: Doc's Arctic "Fortress Of Solitude". While it may appear to be a rip-off of Superman's, that version is lifted, name and location included, from the very first Doc Savage story, published in 1933. Supes first got his retreat hang-out in 1938, it was located in a mountain cave outside of Metropolis, and it was called his "Secret Citadel". The Arctic version and the name "Fortress of Solitude" wasn't used in the Superman stories until 1958.
  • Science Marches On:
    • The brain surgery to which criminals are subjected at the "Crime College". At the time the books were written, it was commonly believed, including by psychologists and neurologists, that career criminals suffered from a treatable malformation of the brain. See Values Dissonance below.
    • Double Subverted In The Land of Terror (1933): someone asks Doc about the theory that we could get lots of energy by splitting the atom. Doc explains that this has just been discredited, as recent work suggests you have to put in as much energy as you get out. This is actually still a scientific fact, and is the reason why you can't just use any old element in a reactor. The catch that was discovered later is that certain atoms have unstable forms that were "pre-charged" by their formation in collapsing stars, only needing a hefty nudge to release that energy and split into more stable atoms.
  • Values Dissonance: The "Crime College", where captured crooks are given brain surgery to wipe out criminal impulses and retrained into productive law-abiding citizens, leaves a bad taste in the mouths of many modern readers. Some later authors have even suggested that Doc was lobotomising the crooks.