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This is a "Wild Mass Guess" entry, where we pull out all the sanity stops on theorizing. The regular entry on this topic is elsewhere. Please see this programme note.
Frozen
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     Jossed 
Frozen is the Snow Queen's Origin Story
That both stories have the Snow Queen in them really IS all that connects the original tale to this movie. This movie will show her rise to power and eventually become the Snow Queen of the original. Gerda and Kay haven't been altered or replaced; their story happens later.

  • Given the finale, Jossed until character derailment

  • Maybe all the characters will somehow figure into the characters of The Snow Queen. Anna might somehow grow up to be the Summer Witch (who is often made to be the Snow Queen's younger sister, and also both have issues with being lonely). Hans might be the father of the prince and princess Gerda encounter. Kristoff might have some connection to the robbers (he could end up the Robber Girl's long-lost father, considering they both like reindeer...)
    • Hell, we have the perfect reason for Elsa to grow up to her eventual role as Kai's captor; he represents her stolen childhood (being isolated from the world and all). Sure, she seems fine and dandy at the end, but we are talking about the subconscious here. Someone who’s spent much of their life locked in a room certainly would have developed a fondness for puzzles...
    • Kai and Gerda may be the parents of Kai and Gerda.

Guesses based on this image:

  • The movie ends with Anna and Kristoff getting married and this is Anna's wedding dress.
  • It's Elsa the Snow Queen's every day wear. As a queen, she can't be seen without a Pimped-Out Dress and because she's a Winter Royal Lady, she has a fondness for white.
  • Because this is concept art, details (such as color) are subject to change.
    • Originally, Anna was going to actually marry Hans early in the film (as the deleted song "Life's Too Short" confirms.) It might be her as a bride.

Frozen will be a commercial failure that will convince Disney to go back to traditional animation
  • The reason that The Princess and the Frog and Winnie the Pooh were not as successful as they should have been was because they had stiff competition when they came out. And what will be playing in theaters at the same time as Frozen? Catching Fire and Disney's own Thor: The Dark World, of course!
    • Disney had made it very clear that they have no interest in going back to traditional animation. If it does fail (which is unlikely, due to the large amounts of advertising and family appeal), it will probably be used as an excuse to try shutting down fairy tale movies again.
    • And it's done very well. Sorry guys, but any hopes for a return to traditional animation are very slender. Much as we might hate to admit it (and I'm very fond of classic animation myself) computer animation is going to be the dominant form for the foreseeable future.
    • This pre-release WMG theory reeks of Fan Dumb and Hate Dumb.
Alternatively, Elsa's curse is Disney's way of sneaking in the mirror shard from the original story
  • This is because taking the time to explain where the shard and the mirror came from would take too much focus from the main story. Turning it into Elsa's curse just saves time and still moves the plot forward.
    • Jossed, when the Troll elder asks if Elsa was born with her powers or cursed, her father says she was born with them. He could be lying, but given Anna's life was at stake, it is unlikely.
      • I think the "curse" is getting a shard of ice in your heart or head or whatever.

Elsa will be a Type II Anti-Villain.
  • Addendum: She will be a Knight Templar Iron Woobie, having cracked under the strain of having to be Queen at such a young age.
    • Semi-Jossed: Elsa is a Woobie, but due to her powers, not her station, and she is ultimately heroic.
    • She tecnically is a Classical Anti-Hero.
Anna has ice powers too.
  • It's been said that there is a big family secret between the two, and Anna has a curious white streak in her strawberry blonde hair. Her powers just haven't manifested yet as Elsa's did, probably will at or near the end of the movie. Anna is supposed to be the 'warm' sister, so maybe something bad that happens to her (her love interest seemingly going for Elsa? One of them seemingly dying?) makes her 'cold' and enraged so they develop. (Of course Anna does not stay this way.)
    • According to leaked tie in storybook images, when they were little Elsa and Anna loved to play using Elsa's ice powers, but one day Elsa accidently blasted Anna in the head with them, almost killing her. Their parents took Anna to trolls to be healed, and they said she was lucky she wasn't hit in the heart, but her memories of Elsa's powers would have to be wiped, and Elsa was forced to hide her powers from Anna and everybody else from then on
      • Based on the film, blasting Anna was no accident. Anna was about to crash, and Elsa blasted her so that she would land in a pile of snow. What she didn't realize was that blasting her was worse than letting her crash.
      • The film explicitly states the blast was an accident. Elsa likely meant to blast underneath Anna but didn't realize how fast the girl was falling, which, coupled with the trip, meant her sister's head got a healthy dose of brain freeze.

This movie will be more like the original story than thought
  • Apparently one of the first guys Anna's going to meet is a handsome and kind noblemen named Hans. My guess is that Elsa kidnaps Hans, Anna hire's forest guide Kristoff to help her get to her sister's castle to rescue him.
    • Jossed.

Elsa is being manipulated into cursing her sister and kingdom
In the trailers, after Elsa runs away to the mountain, the person who is probably manipulating her says:
Unknown: Your magic is beautiful, but you must learn to control it.
  • Jossed. The following words is only a warning from the trolls to Elsa of her powers and her ability to control herself.

The movie will receive similar reviews to that of Pixar's Brave
Based on the various and dubious previews, it will be the first in Disney's line of fairytale movies to not be considered a masterpiece, but will be to the franchise the same thing Brave was to Pixar a.k.a mild disappointment/average. (Though I sincerely hope I'm wrong.)
  • Pretty much Jossed. The film currently has a 89% rating on Rotten Tomatoes and is being called the best Disney musical since The Lion King.

Olaf is Elsa's only friend after the country gets frozen.
  • And he joins up with Anna for the explicit purpose of bringing her to Elsa so that he can make his friend happy.
    • Jossed. There is no clear explanation of Elsa's relationship with Olaf due to both of them barely sharing any screen time together. Olaf may not even know what kind of person Elsa is! Olaf just leads Anna to Elsa's palace because he wants to experience summer, and because he's just plain nice.

At the start of the movie, the Disney castle.....
...will look like an ice castle.
  • Jossed; the Disney and WDAS logos look normal, but their music is replaced by the intro for "Vuelie".

Elsa's ice isn't water
It doesn't thaw and the only way for her to remove it is to send it way, not to mention that it often has weird colours. Maybe she uses frozen oxygen or nitrogen, or maybe it is hell ice.
  • But it does thaw, which is why Olaf can melt. The reason the sun can't melt all that ice and snow is because doing so would require more energy than the sun can provide.
  • I personally thought that the reason it doesn't thaw was because it was simply too cold to melt. She didn't just create ice, she creates an ETERNAL WINTER and ice doesn't start melting till springtime.

Elsa was born on the winter solstice.
It probably doesn't explain her powers, but it couldn't hurt.

  • Jossed. The plot is kicked off by Elsa coming of age and being crowned queen, and it's made clear that this is happening in summer. It's much more likely that the girl with ice powers was born in the summer.

    • Here's an alternate related theory: she was conceived during the winter solstice. Though she would have to be a preemie to be born in mid-July but if she was conceived on the 21st of December then by that time she would already be about 32 weeks [third trimester] along. "By 32 weeks, survival is almost as good as full term".

      • That is with modern medicine, though.

Elsa is actually a Time Lord
What? It just HAD to be said. There's a reason I put it in Jossed!
  • What's her TARDIS? The ice palace?

     Confirmed 
Sven will be a Cute Mute.
A lot of animal sidekicks in Disney films have been following this trend. From the description of being "mangy" with only one antler, he'll probably fall under Ugly Cute, but will be oddly endearing. (Pardon the pun.) It goes without saying that Sven plushies will be all the rage in Christmas 2013

  • Doing that would just make him too much like Maximus from Tangled. But that may be the point due to the horse's popularity. If they make Sven voiceless they will really need to write him cleverly to make him his own character.
    • According to Disney Wiki, Sven will be voiced by Tom "It's A Trap!" Kane.
  • An artist named Prince Kido recently went to an early screening. According to him, Sven will be silent much like Maximus. Additionally, Sven will act like a dog, though not the same type that Max was.
  • Based on the teaser trailer, it looks like they scrapped the one antler idea. Likely, they wanted to keep him symmetrical for ease of animation. Still think this Christmas a lot of kids are going to find Sven plushies in their stockings.
  • Sven does not speak, but Kristoff speaks for both of them.

Hans being evil wasn't in the original script
First he was supposed to like Anna, but it would not be true love, he would kiss her but it would have no effect. Then the scene became Hans revealing he was more interested in the throne then in Anna, but still liked her.
  • Confirmed by the devs. Originally, Elsa was supposed to be the Big Bad, but that didn't pan out, and they just had to have a villain, so the script was rewritten late to make Hans the Big Bad. So the general idea is confirmed, but the details are still up in the air.

    Elsa & her Powers 

Elsa

Elsa's situation, if her sister hadn't intervened, would have led to her becoming a wicked witch for real.
She's already convinced she can't undo what she's done to Arendelle, she gets a lot of innocent pleasure out of creating her palace/making over her wardrobe and feeling like she can let her powers flow freely, but she's already begun creating sentient life, both by accident (Olaf) and on purpose (Marshmallow). She's already under the impression at least (though it doesn't seem to be the case) that the townspeople are horrified by her powers (rather than just surprised/astounded). If not for her sister, she wouldn't have gone back, and after so long having to keep her feelings tightly bottled up and under cover, it's easy to imagine those negative emotions bubbling up in isolation and souring her entirely.

Magic hair
It's also interesting to note that both Rapunzel and Elsa have different hair colors than their respective parents. Both have parents with brown hair, but Rapunzel (whose magic relates to the sun) has golden hair, while Elsa (whose magic relates to ice and snow) has almost white hair. Also, her sister Anna has red hair which slowly changes to white once she's hit by Elsa's magic. Assuming that Tangled and Frozen both take place in the same universe (which is not too far out, considering Rapunzel's cameo in the latter), it's quite possible that one of the "symptoms" of (elemental) magic in this world is indeed hair color. Also, Grand Pabby asks the king whether Elsa was born with the powers or cursed, which means that magic in this world can 'just happen' like with Elsa or originate from an outside source like with Rapunzel (who was technically born with her powers and not cursed, but still got them from an outside source)

Elsa is gay.
  • Her powers are not only a metaphor for homosexuality, she's also a lesbian, which helps feed into her self-hatred and feelings of utter exclusion from society.
    • Interesting theory, but this does give off some awkward/creepy undertones when you remember that what gets Elsa in trouble with her powers is that she almost kills her little sister out of recklessness... so if you replace her magic with homosexuality, would this mean someone someone caught the two sisters kissing?
      • It's a real world case of Hide Your Lesbians, as placing Anna into a childhood friend roll would be trivially easy the way the movie is set up. Also, when has Disney meant ANYTHING other than romantic love when referring to true love? Anna never said "I love you like a sister", just "I love you".
      • Well, at least I no longer feel quite so much like the odd man out for my momentary thinking of Les Yay.
      • That "true love" can mean more than just romantic love is kind of the point. Anyway, people typically don't tell their siblings "I love you like a sibling".
      • Let It Go can be a metaphor for anything. That's what people like about the song. Could be mental illness, a coming-of-age story, or as this post says, "And finally, from the point of view of ideology, Elsa�s plight can be seen as representing that of individuals whose beliefs or values fly in the face of those of modern society, beliefs that must be kept secret, for fear of an individual being socially ostracized, losing employment, possibly even being criminally prosecuted. Along these lines, Elsa could represent a paleoconservative in a society dominated by Cultural Marxism, or an ethno-nationalist in a world that is imposing multiculturalism and diversity, or a traditional Christian in a world promoting secularism."
      • It's about being free of anxiety, finally. Word of God has been laid down.
      • A) source and B) Death of the Author. Elsa's... situation far more resembles being in the closet or mental disorders than any else really; anxiety is not something you're born with (though there are disorders which can induce anxiety almost perpetually), it's not something shamed by society, it's not something that you have to live in fear of hiding.
      • First off, while anxiety disorders are not actively shamed, at least, not in today's society, there are still many people who don't bother to sympathize with those who have them, or lump them into prejudices that affect those with mental and emotional disorders at large. Secondly, there are in fact disorders that can cause anxiety that you are born with—I'm pretty sure that's essentially being born with anxiety, so I'm not sure why you said it wasn't. Additionally, there are disorders that cause people to lash out in rage at their loved ones, become paranoid of them, close themselves off, have dramatic and powerful mood swings, etc. Most importantly, if you thought that Elsa's main problem in the movie was persecution then you missed a very fundamental aspect of her character, one that she herself comments on several times—not a fear of being hated but a fear of hurting Anna. As in, actually hurting her, not just disappointing her or getting her condemned by association. While there are still elements of the problem that can indicate homosexuality, or counter beliefs, or whatever the person watching chooses to associate with Elsa's struggle, the aspect of loosing control of herself, and the fears relating to that, are more in line with mental disorders-ie anxiety related ones. At the very least it is a very viable interpretation, and not one that should be so quickly shut down. Lastly, not sure why it wouldn't be about suffering anxiety—does Elsa not seem to be incredibly anxious about her powers through most of the film? Would someone who's gay and hiding it not have anxiety?

Elsa is a mutant and this movie takes place in the [[Marvel1602 Marvel Universe.
]] Disney does own Marvel after all.
  • Add to this how similar the scene as the coronation goes wrong is to the origins of certain X-Men when they develop powers, and it makes all the sense in the world.
    • It actually fits really well. In Marvel1602, there's a point where the weather over all of the Atlantic has gone screwy, and it could be because that's when Elsa's frozen the islands.
  • BEAUTIFULLY explored by How It Should Have Ended in their "Frozen" video.

Elsa is, at least to begin with, sexually repressed.
She initially doesn't want to get close to people for fear of hurting them. Seems like a logical extension. Plus, there's that fan service during "Let It Go", the scene where she first feels comfortable expressing herself.
  • Especially likely since she spent her childhood wearing heavy clothes and gloves when she wasn't locking herself in her room, and was terrified of her own family touching her because she didn't want to hurt them by accident. Sex involves lots of skin-to-skin contact as well as intense emotions. Plus there's the Word of God stating she has depression and anxiety issues, which are both very unhelpful for someone's libido—and she may not even have a sex drive to repress, given how she was so young when the castle was isolated.

Expanding on the ideas above Elsa has incestuous feelings towards Anna.
Now I'm not trying to sell the shipping here, that's not it at all, but the king and queen locked them away in the castle separately until they were teenagers. They basically isolated Anna and Elsa from the outside world and family as well as the only real friends they've known for their entire lives. They've basically hammered in that Elsa should be afraid of herself and repressed her emotions for years instead of helping her through them. Then they died and she had no emotional guidance at all until the coronation when she was let out. Humans are social creatures and need contact with other people and so sometimes people in extreme isolation or even extremely stressful situations can form strong relationships with who or whatever they can, even sometimes romantic ones. Take Stockholm Syndrome when people in an extremely stressful situation (being abducted) form a romantic relationship with the person who abducted them. Same principle, it would make sense that Elsa would attach almost almost all of her emotion to Anna because that's pretty much the only person that she is close to in this world aside her parents and I would definitely say that being in extreme isolation just paved the way for it. That could include the romantic feelings she never learned to express properly on her own. Plus the subtext between them is amazingly strong!

Elsa is going to run into the exact opposite problem.
OK, so Elsa's powers are fueled by love and other happy emotions, right? But Elsa logically can't be happy all the time, something that she's probably aware of. So she'll try to emulate her sister as a Stepford Smiler in the hopes of controlling her powers.
  • This doesn't make much sense. She'll inevitably have some minor flareups and probably occasionally frost her surroundings if she's upset enough, but now that she can both control her powers and trust that she won't be seen as monstrous for having them as of the end of the movie, she can probably manage her feelings in a healthy manner.

Elsa has Magical Ancestry that ties in with Tangled
At the same time the drop of sunlight fell in Corona, a drop of the icy moonlight fell in a kingdom near Arendelle. The king absorbed it and he and his descendants had powers just like Elsa, and eventually there was an unrelated war between this kingdom and Arendelle. The dispute was settled by 1400, with a marriage for the heirs of each kingdom. Since the King of Arendelle didn't want his children to have powers over ice and snow, the trolls made sure for "400 years, shall the powers be dormant", cue 400 years later (Frozen is set in the early 19th century?) when Elsa was born, the first royal birth in the family after the curse was broken- explaining why her parents weren't surprised that she had powers and accepted them at first.

Elsa's heart was 'frozen'.
In the film they say and sing "BEWARE THE FROZEN HEART" which means having their heart frozen like what happens but also in the movie, Elsa is repressing her emotions and trying not to 'feel', it's once she thinks Anna dies that everything stops and she has some semblance of control. Her heart was also 'frozen' because she wouldn't let herself feel or relax.

Elsa is going to get a boatload of marriage proposals very soon.
Once word of a young, unmarried, female WMD with a petty kingdom of her own gets out every crowned head in Europe that does not feel their pants growing tight at the prospect of unleashing Elsa's power against their enemies will be soiling them at the prospect of their enemies unleashing said powers on them note . The young, unmarried, and female aspects will make the means of alliance or control obvious; although with any luck the incoming bridegrooms will be more straightforward and less ambitious than Hans.

Elsa literally froze her own heart.
When Elsa was told to conceal her powers she internalised them and froze her own heart so as not to feel anything. This is why she goes from "Conceal it, don't feel it," to simply "Conceal, don't feel." This is why her ice can't melt or be thawed. Her own tears after Anna freezes melted her heart and allowed her to thaw the neverending winter. Also ties in nicely with the original tale.

Elsa is the daughter of Loki.
The Queen had an affair with Loki and then Elsa born.
  • Given that Loki's a known shapeshifter, neither the Queen nor the King knew about the affair, or guessed that anything was unusual about Elsa until her powers manifested, after which they likely believed it was a just a fluke. Loki, hardly the most responsible of gods and unlikely to stick around once he's had his laughs, didn't bother to explain his trick or leave any helpful instructions, preferring to see what kind of chaos would result.

Elsa has ice powers because her fairy godfather is the Snow Miser.
Think about it.
  • Whatever she touches turns to snow in her clutch.
  • Elsa created a blizzard in the middle of July. Snow Miser brought snow to Southtown, USA, which apparently almost never gets any.
  • She can create sentient constructs out of snow and ice - similar to the chorus line of miniature Snow Misers?
  • She can also create things like ice skates and dresses out of ice. Snow miser turns his hat to snow and recreates it.

Elsa's epiphany in the finale is a reference to Albert Camus.
"In the depths of winter, I finally learned that within me there lay an invincible summer."

Elsa, being as selfless, fragile, emotionally strong, and feminine as she is, will be a revival to the Classic-Era type Princesses she's so similar to.
Anna of course is completely like most of the modern princesses- she's kind but spunky, adventurous, fearless, and a total Badass who saves the day. However, Elsa is unique and refreshing in that she isn't an outspoken Spirited Young Lady, Tomboy, Badass who "don't need a man's help!" or anything else the typical heroine is nowadays, which has become a cliché, and paradoxically, the "traditional" type of heroines who lack fighting skills, spunkiness, and/or adventurous sides are now unorthodox. Elsa is particularly similar to Aurora- a lonely Proper Lady who is reserved, demure, obedient, and ultimately selfless and dutiful for her people. She can't tell anyone "no" because she knows doing what's right is more important than following one's dreams. Elsa herself even becomes a Distressed Damsel as the Classics have always been negatively accused of being (and interesting that many fans ship her with the Prince-Charming-like Hans although unfortunately that never happened. It is very telling that most people preferred ladylike, responsible, quiet Elsa to tomboyish, independent, spunky Anna (although she rightfully has her own fanbase). TL:DR you could read this fan's post, which describes it more eloquently.
  • Considering that A) Elsa is very powerful on her own right, and B) her being repressed is what caused this whole mess, it seems quite a stretch to assume those sexist notions are validated. Also, most people enjoy Elsa as a character due to her own strength and tribulations, not because she is helpless and "obedient" as you say.note 
    • The only thing sexist here is you calling femininity sexist. The heck? Also, you're the only one saying anything about helpless. Which every single realistic heroine can, will, and does have moments of. As for obedient, I don't know what the quotes are for. Elsa is obedient and this is refreshing. Dutiful unselfishness is not seen much anymore, in a society where rebellious and self-centeredness is generally preferred. If I accidentally implies Elsa or anyone should be a doormat, my bad, but I don't think that implication was there. note 
    • That would imply that said traits are "feminine", instead of "one way gender roles play up". Also 1) yes, every protagonist can have and should have helpless moments, but you imply it is a traditional, welcome aspect of female protagonists, and 2) you seem to be missing the point of Elsa's predicament: ultimately, it was by embracing the "self-centered" (read: being comfortable with oneself; if you legitimately think Anna, Mulan, Rapunzel or the others are "self-centered", you're making quite the stretch) thing that she became happy with herself.[[note]]It is also very ironic that you condemn freedom and self-respect, whilst praising the author for its "rebellious attitude" and "edginess" (read: childish black and white political views)
    • Also this view point seems to take a harmfully black and white stance on what is feminine. this troper at least, can agree that Elsa is very much a Proper Lady type, and is very much dutiful to others over self, but that for the most part doesn't necessarily stem completely from her being a good female, unless you’re saying every good male monarch in fiction should be a brash and self-serving ego maniac as would be the default male prerogative by that line of reasoning. Elsa's defining traits in movie stem less from gender roles and more from her responsibilities as a monarch, and as a decent human being with a working moral compass, something that's not owned solely by either gender, but rather should be found in both. It’s also ironic that you say Elsa breaks the "I don't need no man" attitude found in most modern princess, and your right, Elsa isn't really out to prove anything, she's too busy trying not to destroy everything she loves for that, but in the end she DIDN'T need no man to help her. Nowhere in the film, or in the extra material did Elsa ever show interest in men, or in romance in general, and it wasn't in the way that Merida did it, in a "I don't want to be tied down" way, it was in the "I honestly don't have the time of day for this" way. In the end, both side of the argument can apply to Elsa, and that's ok. From what we can tell from film and story books, Elsa does like traditionally girly things, like high tea, and looking nice in dresses, and she does have a lot in common with the more classically feminine princess of old. But at the same time Elsa is still a strong minded individual who was put into an impossibly difficult situation and came out of it standing on her own two feet. As a princess she certainly knows when it is her place to keep calm and quite for the sake of peace and decorum, but as a Queen she also shows that that doesn't mean she's a door mat, and that being benevolent doesn't mean being used. In the end, Elsa is a refreshing change of pace in that she's not really just another princess with something to prove, and she's not just some pretty face waiting for the right man, Elsa is Elsa, a young woman who has problems which transcend the gender barrier, who enjoys traditionally feminine pursuits not because they're what are expected of her as a girl, but maybe just because she genuinely enjoys them, and that's ok, because that's doesn't make her any less of a strong, independent person, those just happen to be her interest. So many feminist get into a Real Women Don't Wear Dresses mentality, and maybe, just maybe, the real success behind characters like Elsa, and Rapunzel, and Tiana, and who knows how many other princess, hell maybe even, it could be argued, the whole Princess lineup, is because they can be feminist and feminine, they can be as strong or as weak as any real person would and that's ok. note 
    • Hm, perhaps in my attempt to make a hasty summary of Kiowen's post that shares my general idea, I didn't explain well enough and made it more confusing. I just meant I think that because a princess who is so similar to the Classic Era princesses is so popular, this might be a return to making those types of female characters, as a refreshing change. People always preach about how it's OK to be a tomboy like Merida and Calhoun or a Tomboy with a Girly Streak like Anna and Jasmine, or a Girly Bruiser like Rapunzel, yet you don't typically hear much from those people about women who similar DO have, how you put it, a black and white femininity (which I don't see anything wrong with- lots of women are like that and this has been common for centuries). Thanks to our culture's dislike of anything traditional or anything feminine, any time you do see a feminine, girly, or ladylike female, something PC must be added to "make up" for the offensively traditional traits (I think what they did with Rapunzel and Anna are very good examples of this happening). If she likes pink, bakes, wants a prince to sweep her off her feet, she must be an Action Girl, feminist, badass warrior, CEO, something impressive that forgives that girly stuff. It seems every type of woman but the kind I was talking about are defended vehemently, but my hope is Elsa's personality and popularity will change that at last.
    • So character depth is PC now? Then again, you quite eloquently illustrate why PC accusations don't really hold water, since PC = human decency and good writting if your accusations are to be believed.
  • I fear a major issue with the initial argument is that the "more eloquent tumblr post" cited makes it clear that recent Disney characters running the gamut from Anna to Vanellope to Calhoun are all outright affronts to womanhood and considers the idea that women may want to be something other than their view of Princess Classic to be a threat to civilization itself.

Elsa is a reference to the Queen in Chess
The Queen is the most powerful unit (and Elsa is most certainly the most powerful character in the story), but she too is KO'd in one hit (like how Elsa gets knocked out by a Falling Chandelier of Doom).
  • Also, when Olaf was running towards the window, you can see the White Queen chess piece fall over. It's a blink-and-you'll-miss-it moment.

Elsa still becomes known as The Snow Queen.
However, instead of a negative term crafted by fear, it's an affectionate moniker given to her by her people.

Elsa is asexual.
Firstly because why not. And secondly because it kinda works with the ice theme?
  • It's pretty much canon, though we don't have reason to firmly believe it. Hans makes a brief line that "no one was getting anyway with her", implying she turned down several possible suitors, so...
    • Saying that works with the ice theme is really unpleasantly stereotypical. And an anxious, mentally ill woman who worried she'd literally kill anyone she got close to would have even more reason to avoid suitors. I like the idea of Elsa not being straight, but she's not a good character to represent asexuality.
      • Because an anxious, mentally ill woman who worried she'd literally kill anyone she got close to is ''such'' a good character to represent homo- or bisexuality. Listen, buttercup: it doesn’t matter if someone suffers crippling anxiety, depression, mental disorders, physical disabilities, gender identities, what have you. People of all sexualities suffer from those problems, asexual or not. There's a word I'm looking for that describes what your statement implies, but I can't quite... And the "ice theme" the OP was getting at probably referenced specifically the fact that "ice themes" are "alone", referencing that asexuals don't need someone else the way everyone else does because hey, sex doesn't really interest them on a personal level, not that asexuality makes you a cold bitch who doesn't like people at all. They mean alone on a sexual and romantic level. I don't see any "unpleasantly stereotypical" commentary there, since that's the long and short of asexuality.
      • It might not be a positive portrayal of any sexuality, but it doesn't dovetail directly into some preexisting stereotypes about being gay or bi the way it does with being asexual. And as for "ice themes"- "frigid" is a very common slur against asexual people, particularly women. I get what you're saying but there are greater Unfortunate Implications there than if she's any kind of allosexual.

Elsa is going to really get around now.
She is going to make Catherine the Great look like chastity personified. Think about how repressed she was at the time of her coronation. This is a young woman who has not had physical contact with another living being for well over a decade. Consider that one of the first things she does during her self-imposed exile is let her hair down and change into a much more revealing outfit. Now think about what she's going to do now that she realizes she can touch other people and let them touch her. The palace gates aren't the only royal portal that'll be open all the time from now on.
  • That is so horribly offensive, yet exquisitely worded I have trouble coming up with a witty retort. I'll just point out that sex drive doesn't quite work like a bottle of champagne, at least for women.
  • This Crosses the Line Twice, yet is Actually Pretty Funny.

Powers

Elsa's powers are like Rapunzel's
She didn't necessarily acquire them through the ice/sea/whatever crying and accidentally consuming a tear or anything (though it would be a clever nod to The Snow Queen), but they're part of the same set, and probably make them the physical manifestations of Yin and Yang in that planet.
  • Probably irrelevant, but despite Mystical White Hair, Elsa's eyebrows are dark(er), like Rapunzel's.
    • Word of God is that if it weren't for her ice powers, Elsa would be a brunette dead ringer for her mother, so it's entirely possible.

Alternatively...
Elsa's powers are satanic. The King and Queen made a deal with the Devil - I mean Chernabog - to acquire something, and Elsa was blessed by the hell ice powers.

This means she is inherently damned to an eternity of suffering.

Alternatively alternatively...
Elsa's powers comes from either Dagr, the norse god of Day, or his mother, Nótt, the goddess of night, given the reccurence of "dawn" and "day" in "Let It Go"'s lyrics and the fact that Nótt's horse has a frost mane.

Elsa's powers are BECAUSE of Rapunzel's.
Rapunzel's powers are from the sun. Maybe Elsa's ice powers were given to her as a balance? Yes, Elsa is 3 years older, but we don't see her at any age younger than 5. What if her powers didn't develop until she was 3? Also, while Rapunzel's power is healing, not fire, Elsa can freeze someone's heart, causing them to slowly die.

Alternately, Frozen is simply set 3 years after the events of Tangled. We already know it's set after Tangled, due to Rapunzel and Eugene appearing together in a cameo.

Elsa is a human incarnation of a Physical God
I mean she is powerful enough to be a physical god as is. So the incarnation of the goddess of ice or something similar isn't unreasonable.

Elsa's powers are fueled by her stress.
Trying to keep them concealed only heightens the stress, making her power more uncontrollable.

Arendelle is in Westeros and Elsa and Anna are descendants of Night's King and his Other bride.
Thus, Elsa's ice powers are genetic.
  • Being a Game of Thrones villain would certainly explain Hans.
    • Being royalty in a pre-French Revolution setting would also explain Hans.
  • This troper's theory: Westeros is an alternate universe of Frozen, wherein Elsa's Heroic BSOD caused the freezing of most of her subjects, with the exception of a few that escaped. She attempts to reanimate them so they'd be at the least like Olaf before she could figure out how to reverse it, but each attempt just results in a Came Back Wrong. Still, it never deters her, and she just keeps trying. Meanwhile, the refugees of Arendelle tell the kingdoms that accept them of the long night, where the snows fell a hundred feet deep, and White Walkers roamed the woods... (more in depth here)

Elsa's powers were inherited from her father
Her parents tell the trolls that Elsa was born with her powers, and her father seemed to know a lot about how to control them.
  • If this was the case, wouldn't he be better at teaching her how to control them? Her parents meant well but ultimately did more harm than good teaching her to suppress her emotions rather than confront them.
    • He might have had them in his ancestry, if not in his immediate family, and it probably didn't end well; it's not like there are guidebooks for this kind of thing, so all he knew (either first-hand or from family legends) was that the power was somehow tied to emotions and could be highly dangerous.

Elsa's power came from a magic shard of ice
To draw the "snow queen" angle in a little more, When Elsa was still a baby, she had a magic ice shard enter her heart, freezing part of it. Ala Dreamworks' Turbo, now her blood is partially ice powered, hence the ice manipulation, but also drawing on the traditional fairy tale where that was an instigator of that plot.

Elsa's powers are an allegory for mental disorders.
Several people believe that disorders must be concealed and not let anyone see, also the people who suffer from them are told to fear it, (at least around where this troper lives.) seeing it as a destructive force to your career, your reputation, and everything. And several of the people who suffer from it are extremely talented. They are also told to be a 'normal person'. Sometimes they reveal their disorders in times of fear or stress. Can't this be more obvious?
  • Another take on this: mental disorders have the possibility in some cases to grant those born with it amazing insight and talents. those who have a mental disorder can see the world in an entirely different light, that allows them to see things as no one else sees them and do things that no one else could pull off (especially, but not limited to, savants). At the same time mental disorders can be a curse to those suffering from it. Being so different can be isolating, makes it hard if not outright impossible to connect with other people, and when everything gets so overwhelming and you get scared you might lash out in ways that could potentially harm yourself and others. Parents of kids with mental disorders definitely mean well, but if they don't get all the resources they need to understand what their child is going through, then sometimes the cure can be as bad as the problem. In the end remaining loving and supportive is the best way thing anyone can do.
    • If Elsa's mental disorder/s were damaging enough that they screwed up an entire kingdom on the scale an eternal winter would, I highly doubt Arendelle's people would be okay with having her rule them, as happens at the end. Ice powers are acceptable because Elsa found a permanent solution to control them. But there is no permanent solution to mental disorders, nor is there a way to only get the benefits of being born like that. So on a rough scale, the allegory fits, but when you add the detail of Elsa being royalty, it falls apart. (It would make a great AU fic, though.)
      • Not necessarily. Mental illness can be manageable. If we go with the allegory here, then learning to control her powers would stand for learning to manage her illness. And there are plenty of examples of royalty who everybody knew to be "crazy" who nevertheless didn't get dethroned. Of course many mental disorders never truly go away and you can have bad days or even bad years... but it's not as rare as people think to be able to live a relatively normal life, or at least a functional one, even with a mental disorder.
  • Relatedly, it could also be a condition from the autism spectrum?
    • If Frozen were an allegory to Autism/Asperger’s, then effectively we're talking high scale here, on BOTH spectrums; speaking as an individual who is borderline Autism/Asperger’s. We are literally talking about someone (in Elsa's case) who cannot function at all in society. I don't see the allegory as relating to that.
    • Word of God states it's an anxiety disorder allegory.
      • See above.

Elsa's powers aren't limited to being An Ice Person, they're theoretically limitless Reality Warping with emotional triggers
Hence why she can create clothing like the dress and the skates, create sentient life, turn people into ice instead of just coating them with it, and make her ice glow. When she accidentally discovered her powers, she may have been outside in the snow or otherwise thinking of cold things, (Which is not unlikely, considering that the movie is set in Fantasy Sweden) and a combination of assuming she could only control snow and ice and her cold and isolated personality lead to her not trying to use her powers to do anything else.
  • Another possible motivation is that she wanted to be alone, to be separated from other people. (Everyone feels like that at least once, even if they have a family like Elsa's.) The mountains are distantly visible from Arendelle, and she may have subconsciously connected the two.

Elsa is a Jotun/Frost Giant.
Which is the source of her ice powers. Either she was glamoured and switched for an infant princess, or she's a descendant of Loki.
  • Considering the film's Scandinavian setting, and the fact that Trolls are confirmed to exist in-universe, this doesn't seem all that unlikely. Plus, a lot of the things she does with her ice are very reminiscent of the things Jotunn can do.
  • Either that or, depending on which Marvel universe it's set in, she's an omega level mutant with the same powers as Iceman.
    • It doesn't have to be a Marvel universe. The Jotuns of Norse Mythology were neither large or ugly by necessity, especially if partially human.

Elsa's powers are a metaphor for everything.
Yes, even that.
  • Even that?
    • Especially that.
  • What about that?
    • I didn't even think of that! But yes, that as well.
  • What? That too? Gross!
  • Even THAT!? Is this really a Disney movie?
    • Calm down—that couldn't possibly work as a metaphor. Were you watching the same movie?
  • ...baseball? We're talking about baseball, right?

Elsa has ice powers because Rick traveled to the Frozenverse and experimented on her, then he wiped her memory.
  • Well, these are both animated...

Elsa gained her powers from Ice King's crown
Elsa came into contact with that strange crown one day and, by touching it, gained her powers of ice and snow. Sometime after the Great Mushroom War, the crown's next victim would be no other than Simon Petrikov (better known as Ice King).

Elsa's powers aren't just Ice-based, but control the seasons themselves
Since the wintery powers were the first to noticeably manifest (having ice suddenly appear indoors is a lot more obvious than plants acting strange), and were doubtless the most enjoyable for her little sister, she never had reason to explore the other aspects or even think that she had them.

Unfortunately for her, their empathic nature caused the years of being cold and distant following the accident to stunt the development of the other three seasons far more than winter. There were probably quite a few unusually harsh winters during that time because of this. It isn't until her Love Epiphany at the end of the film that her Spring powers awaken in any meaningful manner, resulting it the rather sudden and flowery end to her two-day "Eternal Winter" in addition to signaling the end to her long emotional winter.

Now that she's returned to a more-or-less normal emotional state, her other seasons will start to catch up. Plants will grow faster and flowers start blooming when she's happy, the sun burns brighter when she's mad (or something else often associated with heat), if she's tired or bored the skies could cloud over somewhat, and the ice would only come out on its own when she gets depressed. Of course, she will be able to control these new powers so that they don't become disruptive, and if she tries she will be able to conjure and control plants, fire (which can be combined with her ice powers to make other states of water, and winds ranging from a light breeze to full gale-force and bring or disperse storm clouds as she wishes, possibly even being able to call lightning from them.

But on the other hand if she ever gets scared, there's a whole lot more to go haywire...

Elsa is a Muggle-born.
There was just no Wizarding School like Hogwarts for her to go to, at least not that she knew of.

    Anna & Her ‘Powers’ 

Anna

Anna is not the first princess Hans tried to marry.
Since Frozen is in the same universe as Tangled, it's not hard to imagine the Prince of the Southern Isles wanting to marry the recently returned Princess of Corona. He went to the kingdom celebration (that lasted two weeks) with the hopes of wooing her. However, he had no way of knowing that Rapunzel was already in love with Flynn, ruining his chances. Then he hears that there's a coronation for two isolated sisters in Arendelle...
  • And if Anna and Elsa really are related to Rapunzel, he could well have heard of Arendelle during the festivities in Corona, maybe from idle gossip wondering if either of those Arendelle princesses would marry soon.

Powers

At some point in the film's development, Anna was going to have Fire Powers:
It would have been suppressed by the Troll's magic at the beginning. She wouldn't have started manifesting them yet, and after the Troll removed all magic she wouldn't have access to them. These would have manifested near the end, leading to an Ice and Fire/Winter and Summer motif. There are a lot of foreshadowing left in, such as "You almost burned me!"/"But I didn't." and "What power do you have to stop this?" It may have been cut for time.

Or, there is going to be a sequel involving Anna having fire powers
Think about it. My dad says that he believes Frozen is similar to the Marvel Universe and that you can't have one 'mutant' and not another. Anna could very well have been born in the winter (consisting of December January and February, therefore born in either January or February in order to make her eighteen by the time of her sister's coronation in the summer) and be born with fire powers that only exert themselves when she's extremely angry. Also, for all we know, the two sisters are going to be made to test their love for each other by having to fight now that both have come of age (in modern terms eighteen is of age).
  • And it's going to be called Burned

Anna was touched by Summer, just as Elsa was touched by Winter.
Anna's red hair, green dresses, and general sunny disposition (and sentimentality) are all side effects of Summer's influence. When the trolls wiped Anna's memory of Elsa's powers, they accidentally blocked Anna's power from ever consciously surfacing. This also explains why Elsa's winter magic is so powerful and uncontrollable-she and Anna were supposed to act as mutual Power Limiters, allowing the two to keep their powers controlled until they were old enough to use them properly and responsibly.

Anna has Earth related powers
Another troper mentioned something similar above but, yeah, Anna has powers but they're not fire. She hasn't awakened them yet.

Anna is the one with the power to grant life.
Elsa is a representation of winter, so she got ice, wind and snow powers. Anna is a representation of spring, the season everything comes back to life or is reborn. Notice how there's no indication Olaf is alive when Elsa builds him but is walking and talking when Anna shows up? Notice how Olaf's body parts can be moved around but don't really change, meaning his parts are specific and can't be added or subtracted by surrounding materials... except for the carrot Anna gives him, which somehow works like a real nose? Notice how Elsa had no idea she could create life, despite roughly two decades of having powers she can't control she's never done anything like that before. Notice how the only other living snowman is created in Anna's presence? Also notice that despite the magical ice storm that lasted for days there's absolutely no noticeable damage to any plants or animals when Elsa thaws everything at the end? Elsa's powers have never been depicted as harmless before so why the sudden change? Unless it's ANNA who healed the land by accident as Elsa thawed it. If their powers worked similarly then Anna's powers would also be linked to her emotions but Anna spends most of her time being positive and loving instead of scared and distant like Elsa so she gets better results without realising it.

Anna has Super Strength.
  • She's a tiny thing but somehow manages to:
    • At 1:43 she manages to throw a bronze bust across the room. Even if it's hollow it's still going to be pretty heavy.
      • I thought that bust was made of wood.
    • When Hans nudges her playfully, her attempt to do the same knocks him sideways.
      • However, right before that scene we see Anna accidentally smack Hans in the face. If she really has super strength and limited control over it, she would have probably busted his nose.
    • She knocks away (40 secs) an adult wolf (probably at minimum 150 lbs) with a lute like it was a baseball.
    • When she punches Hans off the boat, he arches backwards.
    • Etc.

     Arendelle and Politics 
The imperial future of Arendelle
Following the events of the movie, Arendelle will use the godlike powers of Queen Elsa to conquer neighbouring nations and become the preeminent global superpower.
  • Somehow I can't see Elsa going along with this.
  • But with her power, Arendelle's economy will have a spectacular boost with the all year round ice she can supply.
    • Also imagine this: Arendelle will now be impossible to invade while Elsa is on the throne: she can immobilize any invading fleet by freezing the waters, and then perhaps shifting the ice to crush their hulls. Furthermore, any invading force going overland to the city could suddenly face enough snow to reduce any march to a crawl while Elsa could create ice barricades for her soldiers to use.
    • Now I'm thinking of Arendelle conquering England and all the world superpower countries. And yes, that includes America.
      • Does America exist yet in this quasi-Medieval world?
      • Will America exist at any point in this world's timeline? Or England? Arendelle is a vaguely Norway-esque equivalent, but there's no direct real-world counterpart, same as Corona; it seems more likely that it's another, non-Earth world, maybe a parallel version.
      • Given the Frozen has an artistic style derived from the 1830s-1840s, there would probably be a U.S. analogue already. For some historical perspective, at around the same time that Elsa is building her ice palace in Arendelle, the Texas analogue could very well be losing to the Mexico analogue at the Alamo analogue.
  • An Empire can't be built on one superhuman and an impenetrable city-state, especially if the city is only unassailable thanks to said superhuman, she can't be everywhere at once so there would be rebellions as soon as she left a province. Granted she could make an army of "Marshmallows" but we don't know if there's any sort of limitations to the personal flurry she gave Olaf to keep him from melting.
    • While she does probably have the 'Cross Me and You Are Antarctica' option, the most that would be good for is extorting tribute rather than any sort of profitable long-term direct rule. The Emperor still needed an army. Whether or not it would be technically possible is irrelevant. It would be massively out of character for Elsa.
    • We are in a position to take this as given, but something to consider is how many rulers will not. Some will be cynical enough to presume she would be happy to aggress (after all, it is what they would do with her power), while others will be less certain but have little firsthand knowledge of Elsa's character and know enough about her power to not want to take chances. In short there could easily be much bowing, scraping, exceedingly favorable trade offers, spontaneous pleas for Her Most Dread And Powerful Majesty's forbearance, etc. no matter what Queen Elsa's planned foreign policy is.
    • It's worth noting that Arendelle would become an incredibly powerful military ally due to Elsa's powers. Castle sieges? River crossings? Countering enemy assaults? Combat recon with golems? She doesn't even have to be constantly on the frontlines. One solid demonstration of her might and rulers would be clambering over each other to secure her as an ally - or persuade her to not become one.
  • It would only last as long as Elsa, or someone else with her abilities, held Arendelle, and we've had no evidence of the power being hereditary (and thus possibly inherited by her or Anna's offspring) or capable of extending Elsa's life. If she manages to make an empire on her power, she'll make a lot of enemies who'll be counting down until she's dead or weakened by age. In a worse-case scenario, attempting to use her powers under such conditions may backfire horribly, and those enemies will be accumulating anyway while the empire-building is in progress. Other kingdoms may have magical resources of their own, whether or not they're open about it, and Elsa openly using her abilities could spark a Batman Begins-style arms-race. As pointed out above, we know that Elsa's unlikely to use her powers aggressively, but other countries don't.

Elsa, and Arendelle, by extension, will gain a great deal of influence in the politics of the realms.
Considering the size of its capital, Arendelle appears to be a fairly minor kingdom, albeit a fairly prosperous one. Now, however, its queen is a Person of Mass Destruction with terrifying ice powers. None but the most moronic rulers would want to piss off a woman who can impale you on icicles with a gesture, summon massive Snowlems to do her bidding, and plunge an entire nation into deepest winter during the middle of summer.

A near obsessively precise census and survey of Arendelle's countryside will be ordered by Queen Elsa
  • That way, if it looks like she will be forced to use her powers with more force than precisionnote  she can issue effective evacuation or shelter-in-place orders (although working the well-insulated bunkers needed for the latter into the budget may take time).

Elsa's reign will mark the widespread acceptance (and return) of magic.
As shown in Tangled and ''Frozen'''s opening sequence, magic still exists, but not many people know about it. note  The implication is that magic did exist, a long time ago, but has now been reduced to a few magical beings hiding themselves away, and a few superstitions that nobody resorts to except in times of crisis.
''Frozen'''s finale essentially smashes this attitude to bits. A powerful mage rules Arendelle, at least one magical creature openly lives in it, and the country's populace is on the way to accepting magic as part of their daily lives. Additionally, the movie's has a strong theme of accepting magic and using it for the good of others. I theorize that Elsa isn't a throwback- she's a herald.

Elsa's refusal to allow Anna to marry Hans was at least partly politically motivated.
Think about it: Hans is the youngest of thirteen brothers, meaning that, at best, he's twelfth in line to the throne, assuming that his father is dead and none of his brothers have any sons of their own. Anna, by contrast, is first in line to the throne of Arendelle. Moreover, she and the rest of the world think she's just the heir-presumptive, but as far as Elsa knows at that point, Anna will definitely inherit the throne. After all, Elsa believes that she can never let another person touch her, so she has to assume that she can never wed or bear children. As such, Anna will definitely, as far as she knows, inherit the throne, and must therefore marry to greater advantage than Hans. Elsa's willingness to contemplate a romance between Anna and Kristoff at the end may be at least in part because she realizes that she is not condemned to lifelong celibacy and chastity herself.

The Troll Hunter is set in the same Universe as Frozen.
Partially out of a desire for revenge and partially to prevent their terrible, vague advice from hurting anyone else in the future, Elsa and Anna decide that the best policy for dealing with the trolls living in the Kingdom of Arendelle is to kill them all. Over the course of the next two centuries, this results in the decimation of the troll population and, as a result, an extreme tendency toward in-breeding. The population of trolls in The Troll Hunter is so dumb that there is no way that they could have survived that way in the long run, and coupled with myths and legends suggesting more human-like behavior in the past, it seems that something like this is the most likely explanation for why they are now dumb enough to attempt to eat their own tails. Hans, the troll hunter, is almost certainly wrong when he suggests that an animal like that could live for 1500 to 2000 years. All of the trolls seen in the movie were born during the 20th century.

During the course of the 20th and early 21st centuries, policies turned more toward containing what population of trolls remained in the kingdom that became Norway, since the monarch who ordered the policy is long dead, and since the trolls have lost the ability to dispense terrible wisdom. This, of course, competes with an attitude that is still generally destructive, leading to troll-hunter Hans being forced to wipe out an entire population to assist in the construction of a tunnel. Regardless of any policy attempting to keep them alive, however, it seems likely that the trolls will eventually die out due to their stupidity.

     The Royal Family 

The whole royal family is really bad at long-term planning
This is partly based on a headcanon from this really interesting fanfic that posited that the 'isolate Elsa' thing was originally something meant to last a few weeks, but because of Elsa's issues ended up dragging on throughout her whole childhood. But it does fit with canon:

  • What does Elsa do after her powers are revealed? Run away to the mountains and declare that she's going to be alone for the rest of her life. Nice and all... but what was she planning to eat?
  • Anna's plan was basically: 1. Look for Elsa. 2. Find Elsa somehow. 3. Talk to Elsa. 4.??? 5. Elsa defrosts Arendelle.

Elsa and Anna are actually half-sisters.
This is just to explain why Elsa has powers and Anna doesn't. They both share a mother, but Elsa's other parent is someone with ice powers. Personally, my bet's on Ithaqua
  • I'll wager a snow queen from another Disney work had a child out of wedlock and not caring to raise it dumped it on this kingdom's doorstep.
  • Or rather than share a mother, they share a father. It's entirely possible to dramatize Elsa's life by having her biological mother die while birthing her (something which is not implausible in medieval setting), then her father remarried.
Either way, this theory also ties in nicely with the above-mentioned WMG that Elsa is a descendant of the Jotuns; her biological parent (either father or mother) was a descendant of the Jotuns with ice powers, which explains why she has ice powers and Anna doesn't.
  • It would also explain why we never see the Queen talking to Elsa; she always lets the King take the lead, as if she feels like it isn't her place to comfort her or give her advice. (I think the only time the Queen talks is when she picks up the stricken *Anna* and says "She's ice cold!")

The King and Queen

Elsa unwittingly killed her parents
  • Elsa's worries about her parents led to their demise across the sea, her powers manifested the very scenario she feared would happen.
The King and Queen survived the storm and are Tarzan's parents.
  • Both movies were directed by the same guy, the character designs are eerily similar and we never actually see the boat sink. Tarzan's parents had enough time to build a giant tree house, so it's possible the queen was pregnant and gave birth to Tarzan on the island.
  • That can’t be right, when it showed the King and Queen’s boat going down, it capsized. In the beginning of Tarzan the boat was on fire.

Elsa and Anna's parents died while their ship was on its way to a wedding — specifically, the second wedding of the king's brother Roland II of Enchancia.

Elsa's and Anna's parents aren't dead
They were lost at sea and survived. Probably rescued by merpeople.

Elsa and Anna's parents' ship didn't sink in a squall.
I know we saw it go down in a squall, but here me out. What if that was what was said to happen? In my eyes, the real story is that it was sunk by a Southern Isles warship as part of the plan to annex Arendelle (part two was to send Hans to woo Anna). Arendelle was fed false information that the ship was sunk in a squall. By Southern Isle spies, no less.

Ancestors & Descendants

Elsa's descendant will be Bobby Drake. AKA Iceman
Hey, mutants are born with the gene. Who's to say that Bobby didn't inherit it from his frost wielding ancestor?

Elsa and Anna are Distant Relatives of Cheryl Heather Mason.

In the 2009 re-imagining of the first Silent Hill, the player character (Harry Mason) is revealed to be a manifestation of the tormented psyche of his daughter, Cheryl, who has been controlling (to some extent) both his actions and the environment as she comes to terms with his death in a car crash.

Distinct similarities exist between the worlds that Cheryl's father explores and the one created by Elsa in Frozen. While the climate of the region where most of the Silent Hill games are set (Maine) would obviously allow for winter weather in the middle of the winter, the snow that falls on the town in Shattered Memories is exceptionally heavy. In addition, it appears to have fallen since Cheryl arrived for her appointment with Dr. Kauffman, because there would be no way for a person to travel if it hadn't. In some places, it is piled up over the road to a height of around ten feet. While this could be accepted as just a psychological manifestation, there is really no indication that the events of the game don't take place in the physical world, and some fairly strong evidence that they might (including some tapes and messages left by individuals who Cheryl would have no way of knowing). Cheryl's Snow World and the eternal winter that Elsa brings to Arendelle are facially very similar.

At certain times in the game, when Cheryl is abnormally stressed, the Snow World turns to an icy Otherworld similar in aesthetics to the versions of Elsa's ice castle and Arendelle that are visible when Elsa learns that she has plunged the city into everlasting winter and when she wakes up after being knocked unconscious by a chandelier, respectively. Jutting, sharp outcroppings of ice appear and the general atmosphere changes dramatically.

Finally, the last portions of the game, when Harry Mason is nearing the end of his search for his daughter, occur in an area sometimes called Nowhere, where the environment is twisted enough to play fast and loose with the laws of physics and spatial placement. An analogous environment exists in Frozen on two occasions, one near the beginning of the film when Elsa and Anna's parents die and one near the end when Elsa believes that Anna is dead. Although in these instances there isn't any spatial distortion, the environment becomes highly distorted, and snowflakes freeze in midair.

Although the creatures in Shattered Memories appear to be flesh and blood, Harry Mason's turn to solid ice near the end of the game makes it distinctly possible that they are formed from ice and snow, and given "fleshy" features by Cheryl's delusions.

So, to recap, Elsa and Cheryl both have the ability to create blizzards. The ice and snow that they generate changes its attributes along with their moods. Beyond that, they can apparently create life from snow. Silent Hill: Shattered Memories is set in the present, while Frozen is set in around the 1840s. The idea that Cheryl could be a distant relative (or possibly even a descendent) of the two main characters of Frozen definitely puts a darker spin on what would have happened to Arendelle had things turned out a bit differently.

Elsa is a descendent of Nancy and Edward from Enchanted.
Her power, like Elphaba's, originates from having ancestors from two different worlds. (Basically, every Idina Menzel character is connected somehow.)

Elsa's crown had an enchantment that counteracted her powers
Considder that Olaf got impaled through the torso with an icicle and impaled through the head with a carrot and neither one really bothered him that much. (He didn't even notice the icicle at first) Of course this makes sense because he's made of snow, and like any snowman, his body material can easily be rearranged to fix any holes or dents that might appear in him.

But when Marshmallow steps on Elsa's itty-bitty crown, he recoils as if it really hurt him. This doesn't make sense, especially when you consider how much smaller the crown is in proportion to him, compared to the icicle and Olaf. So it would seem that something about the crown makes it more painful to magical snowmen then icicles and carrots. Perhaps it was enchanted by an ancestor of Elsa's who also suffered from Elsa's snow magic, and enchanted their own crown in order to keep their powers suppressed. So why is Elsa able to use her magic when she's wearing it? Well perhaps the enchantment has substantially weakened over the centuries, or perhaps the original owner's powers were far weaker then Elsa's.

Either way, something about it makes it painful to magical snowmen. Pain is usually a primal indicator for something that threatens our health or lives, so the fact that Marshmallow finds the crown painful may indicate it's damaging to the magic that gives him life.

    Kristoff & Sven 
Anna and Kristoff will be rivals before they hook up.
I think it would be a coo... neat dynamic. Instead of being friendly they would rather do it by themselves. Then as the cold world proves too dangerous to survive in alone, they decide to help one another survive and then they grow to love each other more than anything else. I just think that would be a nice dynamic that still seems like Disney.

Elsa only appointed Kristoff "Official Ice Master and Deliverer" to give him a good reason to stay in Arendelle aside from Anna and so that he wouldn't feel useless until he and Anna can confirm that yes, they are truly in love.
After all, a job that involves delivering ice is kind of redundant and unnecessary in a kingdom where its queen can quite literally produce all the ice they could ever actually need. Once Kristoff and Anna presumably get married, he'll inevitably get some other, less redundant position and title.
  • Well someone does need to deliver it to stores and the like. Though it’s unknown if Elsa's Ice is even safe for consumption.
    • Olaf is made out of Elsa's ice, and heat melts him down to water like any other ice.
      • That doesn't necessarily mean he's safe to eat/drink, either due to magical dangers or more mundane toxicity. That said, Sven does eat snowflakes generated by Elsa's magic, and he seems okay.

Kristoff is a Changeling Child.
In the intro he's seen as a child going off to work with the adults. and while child labour laws were... laxer... before the industrial revolution, he would still be working with his father as an ice collector. given that the troll says that they'll "Keep" him and Sven it's fitting when you know mythology this would then make Kris a changeling. this also opens up a can of Whatever Happened To The Mouse as to the possible troll-child that may have replaced him.
  • Isn't Kristoff an orphan? It seemed to be implied, at least, by the fact that he didn't seem to have any relation to any of the men, no-one stopped to look for him or call to him while the men were leaving or when he and Sven followed the carriage, and it would mean that the trolls wouldn't have had to leave a replacement since Kristoff had no-one to miss him.

Sven is actually a girl.
At the very beginning of the movie, we see Kristoff and Sven already together as young children; they are still together years later, when Kristoff looks to be in his early twenties. But male reindeer only live about ten years; female reindeer live about eighteen to twenty years. So given that Sven is still alive and in robust health well over ten years after the opening of the film, Sven must be female. Also, among Scandinavian reindeer, older males' antlers fall off in December, while younger males' fall off in Spring; only females keep their antlers into Summer, which is when the movie is set. So, clearly then, Sven is a girl.

Kristoff's real job is going to be as ambassador to the trolls.
Ice Master and Distributor? That's not a thing. It's really just a cover for Kristoff's real assignment, which is to be Arendelle's ambassador to the trolls. It makes sense for Elsa to keep his real job a secret, because she doesn't want the rest of the world to know of the trolls' existence, or where they're located. Having a monopoly on that information could be strategically useful for her.

Sven is actually telepathic.
When Kristoff speaks "for" Sven, Sven's facial expressions are spot-on in time with Kristoff's words. There doesn't seem to be any delay as if Sven is miming along with Kristoff (or the other way around, where Kristoff makes up Sven's words to match his expressions). Perhaps after so long together, Kristoff can actually hear Sven's voice in his head and speaks aloud for him. He may not even know it consciously; it's possible Sven speaks to Kristoff with subconscious ideas which then form Kristoff's ideas as to what Sven should say.

     Olaf and Marshmallow 
Olaf and Marshmallow are manifested aspects of Elsa's personality.
Olaf clearly represents the love Elsa has for her sister, a childish thing that somehow still persists even when he should melt. Marshmallow is her sense of responsibility, overwhelming and scary but happy to put on the tiara in The Stinger complete with a cute little smile.
The living ice, like Olaf and Marshmallow, is unstable.
It doesn't look like the rest of Elsa's magic actually melts when it comes in contact with heat, except the things that never fully froze in the first place (the candlestick and the container when she was practising for her coronation ceremony, as well as the actual items themselves at the coronation). It can only be melted by Elsa herself. Case in point, her dress, her castle ice rink, and her entire winter don't melt, despite the fact that it's summer. The castle likely has all of its fires going, yet it's insides still freeze completely; we even see it freeze a room where a fire is lit. The ballroom unfroze after the incident with Anna no doubt subconsciously, because at the time, Elsa didn't have control over her powers. Likely they unfroze in her sleep, where she can't control her feelings, which is how her bedroom unfroze. It's also why she didn't know how to undo it; she never did it consciously and thought it all unfroze of its own accord. Living ice however, is an unstable part of her magic, perhaps because they're built from stronger, possibly unstable emotions than anything else she makes. Olaf was built absent mindedly in a giddy fit of joy where Marshmallow was built consciously out of a desperate fit of her desire to protect people from herself. Neither time was Elsa really thinking straight when she intentionally used her powers. There are four times Elsa's power really varies and they have relatively consistent results:
  • Total focus on both her powers and what they're doing (freezing the ballroom as a child, creating the ice castle, freezing the castle courtyard, creating her dress, unfreezing Arendelle)
  • Focus on her powers, slight focus on her emotions (any time she panics or is angry)
  • When she's put 100% focus on something other than her powers (the deaths of her family members)
  • Focus on her emotions, absent focus on her powers. (the two times she made living snow creatures)
I think the reason Elsa never made living snow creatures before Olaf is before, she was always focusing on her powers one she accidentally used them, there was never a time when she was focusing on her emotions and using her powers until she left Arendelle.

Olaf and Marshmallow will die once Elsa dies
It's totally possible that the two Snowlems' life force is tied to Elsa'; Should she die, the two will cease to live. Taking this further, it may also be possible that her death will cause her ice palace in the mountain to crumble, although considering its solid design and its location (up in the cold mountain), this is less likely.

Olaf

The reason behind Olaf's dream to experience summer is because of Elsa.
  • When Elsa created him, he ended up reflecting the part of her that yearns to no longer be surrounded in the cold (as result of her ice powers).

Olaf was supposed to melt permanently, but this was cut.
It seems very odd that they foreshadowed a snowman melting numerous times, even in song, and then didn't go through with it. Maybe the focus groups disliked it.
  • It would of been way too sad and melancholic - it's probably wise they cut it, because 'kill the comic relief' has kind of been done before in The Black Cauldron (though it was ultimately averted), and that was depressing as hell...
    • Not to mention it would be even more similar to another iconic snowman, and they didn't want to raise comparisons.

Olaf has real, flesh and blood eyeballs.
It certainly looks that way. What would happen if he melted?

Olaf can always locate the sisters, no matter what.
Building off the idea that Olaf is a manifestation of Elsa's bond with Anna, Olaf will always know where they are. He knew exactly where to go to lead Anna and Kristoff to Elsa when they asked. And while that occasion can be attributed to the fact she made him and thus he was just retracing his steps, he is later able to find Anna in the palace. Rather than wandering around the place blindly and likely sparking off some more panic about the living snowman, he finds the exact locked door that had Anna behind it. He probably doesn't think there's anything special about the fact he can always find the girls, so he never mentions it.

Olaf wants to experience summer because he likes warm hugs.
And doesn't understand the difference between literal warmth and metaphorical warmth.
  • That would explain his fascinated "So that's what heat is!" when he finally feels literal warmth after lighting the fireplace; it was the first time he realized it was something different from the warm-and-fuzzy feeling of a good hug.
Olaf was envisioned by young Elsa to be a snowman who loves summer.
  • It's something that a 6-year-old (or however old Elsa is at the beginning of the movie) might easily think of, and it would explain why she has Olaf say "warm hugs" instead of just "hugs". Anna's outpouring of love at seeing Olaf suggests that he might have been a familiar recurring character in their play, not just that one time, so it would make sense that Elsa would have come up with an elaborate backstory for him. And if Olaf was around a lot during their play, then everything he seemed to know in the movie, he might have learned as the two sisters talked around him.
Olaf is not wise about love.
While his definition of love is good, putting the other persons needs ahead of your own he has a very narrow belief about how it is expressed. He believes if you love something you let it go and remove yourself from the picture, and does not understand that this is not always true. This is demonstrated by the one selfless act he chose to represent love Kristoff taking her to her true love and leaving her life forever, and the fact that he believes Kristoff coming back lessened it.
  • He probably feels that way because that's how Elsa thinks. For years, she felt she was protecting Anna by staying away from her. He's just going off what she believes.
  • Putting someone else's needs above your own and still being present in their lives aren't mutually exclusive. Olaf may have used that as an example because it was the most applicable to their situation.
The reason Olaf is so fascinated by summer is because he was born in summer.
It's summer when he was created, so perhaps that's why? He inherently knows that right now it's summer, and he knows what summer is like because Elsa does (or perhaps because Elsa herself was born in the summer does he know).

Olaf knew all along what would happen to him in the heat.
He's not a Death Seeker, nor a masochist, he simply wanted to experience summer/heat because of the aforementioned WMG and to test if the same would happen to living snow. He's not even a little surprised that he's melting, and when he experiences the heat, he's not surprised he's fascinated. Even when he accidentally sets himself on fire, where he's about as startled as someone stumbling over their cat. He knew full well what would happen if he lit the fire for Anna, but his love and adoration for her made him want to do it anyway for her.
  • This matches my feeling on the matter. His feelings on summer seem to be more that he knows he's being amusing.

Olaf is not quite the symbol of love between Elsa and Anna.
Marshmallow is apparently the symbol of Elsa's wish to be left alone, but his duty as the protector of the ice palace may be a bit more literal: He may have been a symbol of Elsa's need to protect herself. With that in mind, it's possible that Olaf is more like the symbol of Elsa's wish to protect Anna.

Let's consider a few things:
  • Despite being created by Elsa somewhere very close to the ice palace, he doesn't immediately greet Elsa upon gaining conscience, and instead goes down to find Anna. As a proof, Elsa has never seen Olafnote  up until Anna finds her, not to mention that Olaf merely guesses that Elsa "must be the nicest person", hinting that he doesn't know anything about Elsa except that she creates him.
  • Olaf sticks by Anna all the time. He could have tried to negotiate with Elsa when Marshmallow throws the party out of the palace, but no, he follows Anna when they flee from Marshmallow. And after that he sticks by Anna, at least until they arrive at Arendelle.
  • Upon reaching Arendelle, Olaf goes to find Anna first, instead of trying to find Elsa. Sure, the weather has gotten bad by that point such that trying to look for Elsa, who at that point is probably already wandering the vast, obscured fjords, will be a chore, but no, he doesn't even try to go after Elsa.

So in a sense, Olaf is created by Elsa to protect Anna, or at the very least, console Anna while Elsa chooses to live in solitude. Yes, Olaf's birth is accidental, but surely it's possible that while reveling in solitude, Elsa also makes a wish for her sister to be happy, and that wish becomes Olaf?

Marshmallow

Marshmallow is actually female.
This is partially because it wore Elsa's tiara in The Stinger, and partially because Marshmallow didn't feel like it had to have a specified gender.
  • Does Marshmallow have any sex? It's a Snowlem, after all, not a biological organism.

After the events of the film, Marshmallow goes on to become Arendelle's equivalent of the Yeti
  • The Stinger implies that he (or she) is still out there in the wilderness somewhere, and may have grown less aggressive, but is probably still shy of humans due to the state of mind Elsa was in when she created him/her. Long after the events of the movie, travelers occasionally return from the mountains with stories of encountering a giant creature made of snow, but are seldom believed due to lack of evidence. note 

    Hans 
Hans has a couple of those mirror shards from the Original story in his eye and heart.
And if and when he ever gets those shards out, his guilt is going to hit him like a freight train.
  • I like this theory.
    • Me too, and this related to the theory way above that Frozen takes place after "The Snow Queen".
  • Plausible, given that the 'cure' for the mirror shards is either true love or the tears of someone who truly loves you, and both Hans and Word of God states that his childhood was loveless, meaning that there'd be no-one who could cure him and possibly no-one who'd even notice the change in behavior caused by the shards. (Given his ability to deceive others, that might have been the case anyway.)

Hans originally was supposed to die
During the climax where Hans was about to kill Elsa and Anna's Heroic Sacrifice shattered Hans' sword, Hans was originally meant to turn to ice as well and shattered upon impact. But the writers changed possibly because it will cause a Plot Hole when one of the Princes of the Southern Isles is dead.
  • He was the thirteenth in the line of succession. And if he's to be believed, would anyone have even noticed him disappearing?
    • Yes, unless he was literally illegitimate; even spares are royal, and if one goes missing or turns up dead on a diplomatic trip, especially in the wake of a widespread, hard-to-hide supernatural occurrence, there would definitely be inquiries, even if there's no actual fondness for Hans. The only people who know the truth about what happened are all invested in Arendelle, have no proof, and wouldn't be without bias if they were thought to be lying (plus one is a snowman animated by a possible suspect, so...). Sending Hans back alive and letting his family deal with it was the best option.

Hans is gay
It would explain why he's so adamant in gaining power, to be in a position where he can feel safe from persecution, and to make up for being an "embarrassment" to the Southern Isles royal family. Besides, his shared hidden identity motif with Elsa has to run deeper than simply being a duplicitous jerk. There's also the whole theory regarding fraternal birth order and homosexuality. The more brothers a man has that are older than him, the more likely he supposedly is to be gay. Hans has 12 older brothers. I found the implications of this study to be hilarious for Hans.
  • "The so-called fraternal birth order effect is small: Each older brother increases the chances by 33%. Assuming the base rate of homosexuality among men is 2%, it would take 11 older brothers to give the next son about a 50-50 chance of being gay." And you have how many brothers again, Hans?

Hans believed that Elsa intentionally froze Anna's heart.
Anna only vaguely says that she was wrong about Elsa not ever hurting her and doesn't explain it was a stress-induced accident, if I recall correctly. Hans, being a big jerk that isn't familiar with loving sibling relationships, interpreted this to mean Elsa attacked her sister on purpose, though she now regrets either her actions or the extent of the damage. This theory's truth or falsehood doesn't really have any impact on anything else, but I think the idea makes sense and is kind of interesting.

Hans came to believe both sisters were sorceresses, even if Anna didn't know
Since Anna doesn't know what happened, had a witch lock, and was locked away with her sister. And As much as Elsa's personality is ice, Anna's is fire. Hans was too afraid that he would trigger Anna's power. Remove fire when it would be an easy way to destroy the statue. Don’t kiss Anna, (why not he's not her true love, but her passion might light the fire).

A few interrelated WMGs regarding Hans' birth:
Hans is the youngest of 13 brothers, and this is just counting male siblings — it's possible this is just a humorously large Disney family, and it's not outside the realm of possibility, but consider how many other Disney princes and princesses seem to be only children or at the very least have an unremarkable number of siblings, unless they have stepsiblings, sometimes wicked, sometimes benign, such as in the WMG that Ariel's sisters in The Little Mermaid are her half-sisters by multiple moms. Multiple births (twins, triplets, etc.) are perilous for the mother, even today, and even noblewomen in a still-vaguely-medieval milieu would experience quite a toll on their health from carrying a great number of children to term. Either some of the siblings are adopted, giving Hans a possible Loki complex, or they are all by the same mother, making Death by Childbirth a very possible reason why Hans is the youngest at 18 or so, or they are by different mothers and there is perhaps an inherited reason why Hans sees women as insignificant, replaceable, and functionally interchangeable. Alternately, might he be the closest thing Disney will get to showing a Bastard Bastard?
  • You're forgetting that real life royalty and nobility pre-birth control often had a significant number of children. They purposely sent the kids out to wet-nurse to not get the contraceptive benefit of breastfeeding and could have many more children that way.

Hans will reappear in a later movie
Under a pseudonym and with a slight alteration to his appearance of course (like a goatee or shaving his sideburns), but he's one of the few Disney villains whose only comeuppance is that he's sent home in disgrace. Given his determination to off both Anna and Elsa for a throne, what's stopping him going to a further off kingdom where fewer people are likely to recognise him and try again? (Actually thinking about it, who's to say that he hadn't tried this small scale somewhere else before?)
  • Or possibly come back to work as an unpaid stable boy in the castle or somewhere in Arendelle as a punishment, as the fandom is currently suggesting.
  • He has the charge of usurpation levied against him, and the French ambassadorial lord offering to drop him off at the Isles appears to concur with this charge. Unless he escapes, he will likely be facing justice back home. And probably one of his older brothers acting in an ambassadorial capacity will be sent to Arendelle to try and smooth out diplomatic relations.

Hans' brothers are the Wild Swans
Since it's also a Hans Christian Andersen story. (The number is off by one, but there are multiple variations of the story.) They're actually his stepbrothers: his mother cursed them into turning into swans in order to give him a chance at the throne. However, his stepsister reversed the curse, but he doesn't know she was responsible, and when the brothers returned, the queen got her comeuppance. Hans learned from her mistakes, and won't go so far as to use magic and curses to achieve his ends, instead using subtle manipulation.

It has often been complained that Hans' descent into evil happened way too quickly and felt like Third Act Stupidity. The trolls openly sing 'Get the fiancé out of the way and the whole thing will be fixed' in Fixer Upper. After Hans is imprisoned, Anna dates Kristoff, or at least shows a romantic interest in him, as the trolls hoped for.

The trolls have already shown to have questionable morals and ability to rewrite human brains. Hans' evilness kicks in directly before he kisses Anna which would confirm/deny whether or not they share true love. Taking Hans' seemingly genuine fondness for Anna, his efforts to be a good leader and his heartfelt plea for Elsa to avoid killing, this suggests a possibility that Hans was trying very hard to balance his ambitious nature with a desire to be a good person, and the trolls had a hand in pushing him down the slippery slope to make sure their OTP became canon.
  • What 'questionable morals' are you referring to? The trolls are overbearing and insensitive, yes- but that's not on the same level as brainwashing for fun and profit. Their advice about Elsa's powers was misinterpreted by Elsa and her family- the sorrow it led to was not their fault.
    • Tampering with Anna's brain without her consent, even if it was 'for her own good', and showing Elsa scary visions about her powers when she was already frightened out of her wits and horrified of what she'd done is pretty damn questionable if you ask me. The parents were worse, but the trolls were pretty terrible mentors themselves.
      • Consent? It's not "evil" to save someone's life, just because they're too unconscious to give consent. Plus she was a child, so her father could give consent on her behalf. I'm not saying the trolls and her parents didn't make a mistake, but it clearly wasn't born of malice.
    • Okay, that could work. But the only way they could cast the magic would be to direct it miles away (if the family's mountain ride is any indication) to a person they have never met before...and know almost nothing about, aside from 'he's Anna's fiancé'...? Still possible, but highly dubious. Magic is not a Google search engine. (Elsa is an exception, being a different species and largely uncontrollable for the film's duration. Remember, we have no indication that the trolls are similar to her in power range or magic type; their abilities and methods of using magic are quite different.)
  • I don't know. This all just seems like an excuse to apply Draco in Leather Pants to a very cleverly conceived and unique Disney villain.
  • No. It doesn't work. Grand Pabbie specifically says that the heart can't be changed so easily.

Hans is the mirror
As detailed here.

Hans and his family are related to Prince Charming.
Hans has a similar colouring to Prince Charming from Cinderella, and his uniform is very similar too. Since Hans is an inversion of the Prince Charming archetype, I think there may be some connection. Perhaps one of his oldest brother is Prince Charming, or Hans' family are the direct descendants of the Prince. That may explain why Hans was able to mimic the "Prince Charming" character so well, because it's so well-known; he heard stories of his ancestor and his marriage to Cinderella (a girl that he only met once, not dissimilar to how quickly Anna and Hans got unofficially engaged) from his parents and it may be part of his kingdom's legacy, so he was able to look, act and dress the part of the perfect suitor while hiding his real motives. Charming's ideals may even be something of great importance to Hans' kingdom, which is why Arendelle knew that sending him back to his brothers would be a perfect punishment, as Hans betrayed the image and ideals that he was raised to follow (just not like that).

Hans heard his mother say the same words he uses on Anna
Or even worse, she used it on him.
Hans: "Oh Anna, if only there was someone who loved you."

Hans as not working on his own agenda.
His older brothers staged a coup, and are threatening to publicly execute the king and queen unless Hans covertly takes over a kingdom to prove his worth to them. Hans genuinely loved Anna, and his evil acts were nothing but a show. He never actually intended to kill Elsa, only make it look like he killed her. When he returned to the Southern Isles, he was declared useless and executed, along with his parents. The Southern Isles eventually became part of modern day Germany, and an offspring of one of Hans' brothers, under the pseudonym Adolf Hitler, started World War II.

Hans' brothers aren't all neglectful.
With the exception of the few eldest, Hans' brothers are all quite fond of each other. They find solace in each other because their parents focus only on the princes who are old enough to hold the throne at some point. This is why he sought power in another country, rather than interfering in his own country.
  • This leads to one of my theory - Hans has twelve older brothers, and he mentioned that some of them acted like he didn't exist for several years. Actually, he isn't lying a whole lot - he's just telling how he himself remembered it. They "Acted like he didn't exist" when he was very young, yet his oldest few brothers were well into their teen years and adulthood around this time. While they were off getting married or being trained how to rule the southern isles, he was being a kid, and being as self-centered as kids are, thought they were shutting him out because they hated him. This leads into the WMG mentioned that, with the exception of the few eldest, Hans's brothers are all quite fond of each other. Because he never actually said which brothers shut him out, he could easily fool Anna (and the viewers.)

Hans is Hans Christian Andersen
When he returns to the Southern Isles, his family disowns him and he is forced to make his way in the world as a traveling storyteller. Writing The Snow Queen was his way of getting a petty little revenge against the sisters who foiled his master plan.

Hans's The Wise Prince act isn't entirely an act.
He's a backstabbing manipulator, sure, but that's all politics and business. Outside of his efforts to seduce Anna, his various Pet the Dog moments are all genuine because he's that sort of guy. Which of course, still leaves him plotting to seize the throne of Arendelle because he wants his own kingdom and he knows he won't get it being the 12th Spare To The Throne back in the Southern Isles. Compare to the Duke of Weselton, who is a greedy fear mongering miser, but has no intentions of trying to launch a coup of a sovereign nation. Assuming these to be true in both cases, they make for a very interesting set of foils for each other.
  • I suppose that he still has a shred of humanity in him. He also wants to be an adored ruler, so he certainly won't be launching wars unless otherwise. And of course he could finally have the power he craved and the love that he never got in the first place.

Hans was acting on orders from his parents/brothers/the primary political power of the Southern Isles.
A fairly-prosperous, politically-vulnerable kingdom with important stakes in trade is always nice to have, and the Southern Isles are either successful enough to harbor imperial aspirations or sufficiently-taxed to deem usurping a sovereign nation an acceptable risk. (They have thirteen male heirs, they're going to run out of land and titles fast.) As the youngest son, Hans is the least likely to gain a legitimate inheritance, and the most expendable; when the Isles heard about Arendelle's only royals, both unattached young women, Hans was the natural representative. This doesn't change anything about Hans' goals or character, and he would almost definitely have tried to make Arendelle his base of power instead of just part of the Southern Isles hegemony; it just means that while he might be jailed or executed, his brothers won't be surprised by his attempted coup.

The real Prince Hans, whose ship was delayed and subsequently blocked by the ice storm, will be none too pleased to hear about his impersonator.

    The Duke of Weselton 
Prince Hans and the Duke of Weselton are related.
It has been revealed that Hans has twelve older brothers. The Duke has two bodyguards that somewhat resemble Hans, albeit much older. The Duke could be Hans's father, uncle, grandfather, or even an older but authoritative cousin. In addition, Hans grew up "feeling practically invisible", which could suggest that the Duke forgot Hans existed, and therefore never bothered using Hans as his yes-man.

The Duke is a Control Freak
People born with magic is obviously a well-known (if rare) phenomenon, so clearly, his mistrust of Elsa after she's outted isn't due to irrational hatred, but because he has no magic of his own, and given how he is focused solely on the acquisition of wealth (and status if manageable), it stands to reason that he wouldn't appreciate anything not under his control.

The Duke is as much a sovereign as Elsa, and her father before her
While it's true that a Duke is a noble rank, it can also be a monarchical one. See The Other Wiki for more details.
  • Well he would have to be, he's after trade, not taxes.
    • Both highly ranked noblemen and sovereigns would have good reasons to care about trade.

Fred Best is the lost heir to Weselton.
The man we know as Fred was misplaced as a child (or deliberately pilfered by one of his father's trading rivals?) and left in a basket on the front steps of a printshop; he grew up an ink-streaked urchin unaware of his true birthright. Pointy features, slight stature, devious and resourceful nature, and magnificent mustache — how clearly he bears these signs of his heritage!

    The Trolls 
The trolls' prophecy wasn't referring to Anna and Elsa...
...but rather, to the infamous Saint Seiya anime scene involving Andromeda Shun warming up Cygnus Hyoga with his Cosmo at the Libra Temple.
Also related to Saint Seiya: Elsa is an ancestor of the Crystal Saint, and the first ever user of ice Cosmo.

A stone/earth mage used to live in Arendelle.
That's how the trolls were created, and why they have so much knowledge of magic- their creator taught them about it. The speed with which Anna's parents realize, 'Oh, our daughter has been wounded by magic, we must take her to the trolls' implies that magic powers, though rare, are not unprecedented in the film's universe.

The Trolls are psychic
Okay so, since I saw Frozen I've more or less been listening to the soundtrack on repeat in my car, and I've discovered something:

The trolls have the power to know everything about you by looking at you. And they give super cryptic hints about everything.

In the opening of the movie the King takes young Anna and Elsa to the trolls, and the elder troll immediately knew that he was the king, Anna had a shard of ice in her brain, and Elsa had ice powers. There was no questioning done, he just knew these things. He then told the King that fear was going to be Elsa's worst enemy, which the king takes to mean other people being afraid of Elsa, but what the troll meant was Elsa's fear of her own powers.

Which brings us to later in the film: The song 'Fixer Upper'. At the start of the song the trolls just assume that Kristoff brought Anna home to meet them so they go into the tradition of families everywhere by embarrassing him in front of his date.

That is, UNTIL he tells them she's engaged. Then they all use their power to look at her for the first time to figure out what she's doing there.

The next verse is about how Anna needs to dump Hans, which would be a SUPER rude thing to say to someone, especially someone you just met. But the trolls know he's evil, so they're telling her to get rid of him "Get the fiancé out of the way and the whole thing will be fixed". Sure, Elsa and Kristoff both told Anna she can't marry someone she just met, but they seemed to be telling her 'get to know him better' where the trolls outright say 'dump this guy right now'.

The next line is 'We're not saying you can change him 'cuz people don't really change' sung to Anna. At first it would seem that this line is about Kris, but why would Anna want to change anything about Kris? I think this line is about Hans, and it’s the trolls way of saying 'Don't stay in a relationship with him after you learn he's evil, it won't do any good'. The trolls can't see the future, just everything about your own past.

After that you get the lines 'We're only saying that love's a force that's powerful and strange. People make bad choices if they're mad or scared or stressed, throw a little love their way and you'll bring out their best'. This and the next verse is their advice about Elsa. Anna needs to forgive her for being a jerk on top of the mountain, and the only way to end the eternal winter is to make Elsa feel love - the selfless act of love Anna does for her at the end.

Finally the song ends with a rushed marriage between Kris and Anna. The trolls were never serious about this; they just wanted to drive home the point of how silly it is to marry someone you just met to Anna.

Then Elder troll dude comes out again and gives Anna some more cryptic advice because they can never tell things straight. But they know things.

The rock trolls can see the Red String of Fate
Kristoff says his family is made of "love experts" yet they try to force him and Anna into marriage immediately. This is because they can tell that the two are soulmates, and so whoever Anna is engaged to is obviously not the right guy for her. They don't bother explaining this because they think that everyone can do it and Anna is simply turned off by some minor flaw. The fact that Kristoff can't do this is one more reason they think he is "socially impaired".

The King and Queen didn't misinterpret Pabbie's advice
Pabbie wanted Elsa to repress her powers. Think about it: Out of all the images he could have shown Elsa, why would he show her an angry mob attacking her? He was trying to convey that Elsa needed to learn to control her powers. Why not show her an image of her losing control? His treatment for Anna was to remove all memories of Elsa's magic. So he wanted Elsa to keep her powers a secret, at least from her sister. Also, the King discussed his plans to keep Elsa cut off from the world in earshot of Pabbie. Pabbie could have set the King straight right there, but he didn't. Either he didn't realize what the King was planning to do, or he agreed with him.
  • I agree, the king and queen's actions were logical first steps: minimize knowledge and exposure until Elsa learns to control her powers. Elsa losing control of her powers and the people turning on her is a legitimate threat and one that almost happens for real when she's exposed, it just wasn't the only problem. Nobody intended for Elsa to remain locked away living in fear and self loathing, that was Elsa's doing, by misunderstanding herself and her powers and her parents dying before they really figured things out. The king was even shown trying to help her contain her powers but even he was eventually pushed away by Elsa.

    Oaken 
Oaken, the trading post owner, and the guy we see with his kids in the sauna are married.
Hoo-hoo! Family!

Oaken is gay.
When he waves to his family in the spa, we get a quick shot of them waving back. Oaken's family seems to be comprised of a big blond guy who's a match for Oaken in size and assorted children and teenagers.
  • Dey grow em big up dere doncha know. Could easily be his eldest son.
  • Well we don't see a wife. And note that it isn't unusual for a family to go to the sauna all together in Scandinavia, both male and female members of the family (at least where this troper lives) so that isn't a definite reason for her not to be there. (Of course it could be that it was just too crowded in the sauna. It seems to be a large family.)
  • There's plausible deniability in genetics; since Oaken is blonde (or at least dirty strawberry blonde), he can have a blonde kid (the large fellow) if the mother is brunette (with a blonde recessive gene - there is a smaller lady at the side of the tub who is a brunette). This leads to a fascinating WMG, which is that Disney put this in there to troll the inevitable culture-warriors with nothing better to do by putting a family in there that would cater to *any* interpretation, thematic, logical, scientific, or "I'm batshit desperate for copy and need talking points for Fox News by five this afternoon."

Oaken told Olaf about Summer
Oaken was making a huge fuss about his "Big Summer Blowout", and just absolutely needed to sell the idea to anybody. It could be possible that before meeting up with Anna and Kristoff, Olaf came across Oaken's trading post and Oaken told him all about the joys of Summer, but not about what heat does to snow. He was hoping to finally sell away his summer items, but couldn't since Olaf obviously doesn't have any money.

    Frozen / Tangled Connections 
Frozen will subvert several Tangled plot lines and tropes.
  • Zig-zagged. Like Rapunzel, Anna is very naive, enlists an attractive loner to help her (with whom she falls in love), and talks in an anachronistic manner. However, her naiveté has harsher consequences.

Kristoff was robbed by Flynn and his gang, explaining why he hates people.
"People will beat you and curse you and cheat you!"

The King and Queen died en-route to the celebration of the return of Rapunzel seen at the end of Tangled
Since Rapunzel and Eugene's appearances show that the two share a universe and the two had to travel there by ship, probably the King and Queen went to celebrate the return of Princess Rapunzel, but then got caught in a freak storm. The timeline certainly lines up: Elsa's coronation is when she turns twenty-one, three years after her parent's deaths. Assume that she and Rapunzel are the same age- Rapunzel returned to her rightful place at eighteen years old.

Also, "See you in two weeks."

The Queen of Corona and the Queen of Arendelle are sisters, and Rapunzel is Anna and Elsa's cousin.
Many have commented that the girls look similar. Some complained that this was laziness on the animators part, but since it takes place in the Tangled-verse, it stands to reason that everyone is part of one big happy royal family.
  • Given that this is clearly Europe, and how European royalty went, even if they're not sisters there is inevitably a tremendous degree of relation. They're just lucky that their universe's physical trademark of royalty is prettier than Habsburg Chin.

Alternatively, the Queen of Corona and the King of Arendelle are siblings

Because of Rapunzel and Eugene's cameo during the coronation this will lead too....
An Avengers style cross over where Snow White assembles Belle, Elsa, Cinderella, Merida, Princess Aurora, and Ariel to fight against some insidious threat.

Frozen and Tangled occur in the same universe as Shrek
They all take place in fairytale-type settings filled with mythical creatures and magic spells. How cool would that be?

This universe's version of the Hapsburg Lip is the condition known as Anime Eyes.
The girls' eyes are larger than normal and spaced far apart. They are also royalty, and Rapunzel and their mothers share the trait. No other human character seems to have this trait. It's a good thing we consider it attractive rather than, well, what the Hapsburg Lip looks like.

    The Original Tale 
Frozen is set after the events of "The Snow Queen"
In the script, a pair of characters named Gerda and Kai are prominent members of the royal court. It could very well be they decided to live with their friends the Princess and Prince (now the rulers of Arendelle) of the original story at some point, only for history to repeat itself in a new generation.
  • Addition to this:
    • Gerda and Kai took it upon themselves to look after Elsa and Anna after the King and Queen drowned.
    • Bae (the reindeer who took Gerda to the Snow Queen's palace) is Sven's father.
    • The evil troll who made the magic mirror is an outcast from the troll group after using evil magic (probably as a result of a Deal with the Devil, one version of the original tale has the mirror been made by the Devil). Which would explain why they seem to know a lot about Elsa's powers. The grandfather troll could even be the evil troll's brother.
      • Related to this, the troll was the one who gave Elsa's power, but unintentionally. The troll originally meant to use a spell on Gerda and Kai, but the Prince and Princess got in the way, and somehow gave Elsa her abilities.

Frozen is happening simultaneously with a version of the original Snow Queen story.
In the original, Kai is affected by the mirror's shards and given a task by the Snow Queen, who promises to 'make him his own master' and 'give him the world,' both of which seem like just the kind of thing Hans is after. The Snow Queen made him the same promise, sans the fairytale's skates, but instead of solving a puzzle, Hans was tasked with killing Elsa: The Snow Queen could sense Elsa's power and didn't want such a powerful rival, but was barred from acting directly due to her status as a supernatural (not human-with-magic) being, plus she likely didn't want to risk herself. Since Hans failed, of course, the Snow Queen has probably lost interest in him, though that might not stop her from trying again.

The story of The Snow Queen will still take place, just differently now that Elsa is good.
If Elsa had remained in her ice palace, she would have become the Snow Queen from the story. Since she came back though, it will play out differently.

Kai and Gerda live somewhere on the outskirts of the kingdom, or in a neighboring kingdom. One day, the mysterious Snow Queen Elsa comes and takes Kai away. Gerda sees this happening but is too late to stop it, and nobody will tell her why this has happened. She comes to the conclusion that Queen Elsa must be evil and has kidnapped Kai, so she sets out to rescue him. Along the way she encounters the trolls, Olaf, Rapunzel and Flynn, and others who help her on her way. She eventually runs into Kristoff and Sven. Kristoff knows that Elsa isn't really evil, but plays along and brings Gerda to the palace anyway so she can find her friend. When they get there, Kai is there but he's acting cold and stoic instead of like a normal boy. It turns out that he was under some kind of wintery spell - maybe he developed the same powers as Elsa, maybe he got hit by a frost spell, maybe he got a shard of ice stuck in his heart - and Elsa took him away because she wanted to try and help him. Gerda's love and devotion ends up being the key to finally curing him, and they go home together.

A bad end would result in The Snow Queen
Distraught by her sister's death, Elsa locks herself away in her ice castle. Years later she takes a boy named Kai up there...
  • Disturbingly likely. Loneliness can make people do terrible things.

Frozen is the sequel to The Snow Queen.
The Greta and Kai extras are actually the Greta and Kai from the story, and the Queen of Arendelle is... somehow, the snow queen? But somehow stripped of her powers because they went into her firstborn. Or something.
  • Alternatively, the King and Queen were the Prince and Princess from the original story. See the theory way above.

"The Snow Queen" story happened long ago, and it became a legend to the people of Arendelle.
Kai and Gerda were named after the two in the original legend, and the ice harvesters singing "Beware the frozen heart" could also be a reference to the mirror shards in the eye and heart that happened long ago, especially because some of those shard pieces could still be out there. It is also possible that due to the Snow Queen's influence, some people are born with ice powers as she was. Hence Elsa. Perhaps the legendary Snow Queen is still alive?

     Other Disney Properties 
Ariel and Eric are the monarchs of the Southern Isles.
Let's say that the human city seen in The Little Mermaid is Copenhagen (where Hans Christian Andersen lived, and which has a statue of the Little Mermaid in its harbor.) Copenhagen is located on the island of Zealand, part of the archipelago that makes up the eastern half of Denmark. Denmark is south of Norway, so the Danish Archipelago is the Southern Isles. (Presumably, in this universe Denmark became partitioned so that the Southern Isles and Jutland are separate countries.) And Hans has red hair, so either:
  • He's Ariel and Eric's son, but why wouldn't he mention that he has one sister in addition to twelve brothers, unless it's because he's a sexist Jerkass? And what does it say about Ariel's parenting skills that he turned out to be a bad seed? Or —
    • Maybe he did mention his older sister but Anna missed that because of the huge number of brothers, or he never got a chance to before Anna cut him off? It doesn't say anything about Ariel's parenting skills if a few of her kids turns out to be a bit jerky, since including Melody, there's 13 of them. Unlike Anna, he didn't take this in stride because he had several big brother bullies. If Ariel and Eric don't know their sons are tormenting one another, there's nothing they can do, and if Hans doesn't voice his bitterness, it just consumes him.
  • He's Eric's youngest brother. He got his red hair from his mother, and Eric was attracted to Ariel because of Like Parent, Like Spouse.
  • This is (somewhat) backed up by the fact that Ariel herself comes from a huge family of 7 sisters and comes from a place where huge families are commonplace (fish). She could very well have wanted a huge family herself. The only snare is that Melody would be significantly older than the oldest brother because she doesn't have any during her movie.
    • Also that The Little Mermaid takes place about three centuries earlier.

Elsa knows of Ariel and Eric
The Little Mermaid probably takes place 10 - 20 years before Frozen.
  • Both of these fairy tales (Frozen and The Little Mermaid) were written by Hans Christian Anderson, after all...
    • Technically, Andersen didn't write Frozen, he wrote The Snow Queen. And despite the marketing, the two don't really have anything in common, beyond having a queen with winter powers, trolls, and a pair of siblings.
      • You sound like the person who told me on my RP blog I couldn't have two characters be cousins even though their stories take place around the same time, the characters are similar (even sharing a voice actress in the Disney adaptations), and the stories are even similar. Don't crush peoples' opinions based on superficial details. It's not like "The Little Mermaid" has a great deal in common with its source material either, seeing as Ariel doesn't get her tongue cut out nor does she die and turn to sea foam at the end, nor does it feel like she's walking on white hot knives every time she takes a step. As a WMG above states, this could be a prequel to the actual Snow Queen story (if Elsa grows as cold as her powers and lives a long time due to her powers). There's no reason Ariel and Eric can't be part of this universe if Rapunzel and Eugene are, especially since The Little Mermaid is also a HCA story like what Frozen is based on.
  • Doesn't The Little Mermaid take place in the 1500's, while Frozen take's place in the 1800's? Then again, Elsa could know of them as distant ancestors...

Ariel and Eric ruled over what eventually became the kingdom of the Southern Isles.
Seeing as The Little Mermaid takes place about three centuries before Frozen, Ariel and Eric's kingdom expanded over the generations. It eventually led to The Southern Isles becoming a kingdom.

The next Disney Princess movie will include a mention of the "weird blizzard last July".
Just to tie it in with this movie like this one gets linked with Tangled.

This movie takes place in the same universe as The Incredibles.
  • So Frozone's powers are magic-based?
  • Alternatively, Elsa is the first waterbender
    • Or the last.

The movie was written to gel well with Kingdom Hearts
Hearts play a significant role (to the extent of true love being defined in terms of the heart rather than its own context as usual), villains are sufficiently minor and unrelated to events that Xehanort can be squeezed in into quite a large role with minor fuss, and the Anna/Elsa pair appears so startlingly similar to Sora/Riku that interacting with them may well serve a character development role for the latter pair by showing them where they/the other were/was pre-character development and that not having a 'Sora and Riku are split and each follow one sister for this world' would practically be a plot twist.
The similarity and fit seems too great to be an accident. Thus, it must be by design. They knew it'd show up eventually, so they made it work well for it.
  • Corrupted!Elsa would make for an awesome boss battle.
    • Or even just Ice Queen Elsa. She was quite unstable already, and then she went over the edge because of the assassination attempt. Besides, Beast was a boss fight in Kingdom Hearts II because of his Xaldin-induced freak-out.
    • Hell, if Elsa mistakingly thinks Sora's going to pull a trick like Hans's gold-digging, she is not going to put up with anyone trying that on her kingdom or her sister. Heck, Anna could be a terrifying boss battle or the sisters as a Dual Boss could also work.
      • Bonus points if Anna is weak to the Blizzard element, having been nearly killed by it twice.
      • Why go small? Maleficent recruits Hans. Since Hans is a sociopath, he can control the Heartless with ease. And if we want to throw in Tangled as well, have Maleficent revive Gothel and Sora has to deal with both of them.
      • More bonus points if, during an Elsa boss fight, she has an attack that, if it hits Sora, doesn't actually do damage, but if Sora doesn't get healed within a few seconds, instant popsicle Game Over!
  • A Boss Battle against a Heartless manifested by Elsa's fears would be awesome!
  • It's pretty much a shoo-in for Kingdom Hearts III at this point. There's two reasons why a Frozen world would be beneficial for both franchises:
    • Pandering to the Japanese fanbase. Frozen is enjoying Titanic-like success in Japan, which is also Kingdom Hearts' country of origin. This almost guarantees it a spot in the game.
    • Helping to introduce more male fans to Frozen. Even if it's a Cast Full of Pretty Boys, an RPG video game has a much higher proportion of male fans than a Disney princess movie, so if Arendelle as a world is done awesomely then it'd succeed in winning them over.

If Frozen appears in Kingdom Hearts 3 and D-links return from Birth by Sleep, Elsa will be one.
She'll basically grant every Ice ability in the game, with the "limit break" being, what else, "Let it go".

Likewise, we're going to see an alternate universe version of the sisters in Once Upon a Time.
Elsa's abilities are very dangerous, and have the steep price tag of social isolation. Anna was saved by Troll magic, but at the cost of her memories. First rule of Horwitz and Kitiss's take on Disney canon? Magic always comes with a price. The feminist themes of Frozen and Hans's nasty subversion of Disney Prince also would fit right into a universe where Alice is swinging a sword, Snow White is a deadly archer, Red Riding Hood is a werewolf, and the "wicked stepmother" is a deeply screwed up mess under all the grandstanding, murder, and sorcery.
  • Status: CONFIRMED!!! Storybrooke, Maine is in for one nasty winter come Season 4
    • Knowing the series Anna died and Elsa became closer to the Snow Queen of the book as a result.
      • Nah, they got Kirsten Bell herself to reprise Anna. Though spending who knows how long in a jar in Rumple's closet probably didn't do Elsa's sanity any favors.
      • For how many episodes worth of flashbacks do you believe they managed to contract her for?

    Disney, the Polar Vortex and Reality 
Disney has been pursuing a long-term strategy to sabotage Universal's chances of making Wicked into a movie.
Universal bought the adaptation rights to Wicked and funded the production of the stage musical with the intent of making it into a film. It's taken them so long to do this that Disney has now co-opted the setting and timeframe of Wicked in Oz: The Great and Powerful, and co-opted the plot, character arcs and star (Idina Menzel) of Wicked in Frozen, so if a Wicked movie does come out, audiences will feel like they've seen it all before.
  • Maleficent takes this further, co-opted the basic story idea of telling a famous tale from a villain's perspective and making the villain, who previously was unsympathetic, a misunderstood heroine. So now Disney has leveled a triple whammy against Wicked; unfortunately for them, "Let it Go" increased Idina Menzel's popularity to the point where audiences crave more, and a Wicked film starring her could easily take advantage of that.

There is no coincidence that Frozen was released before the 2014 Arctic blast.

It takes inspiration from the actual princesses of Sweden, Victoria and Madeleine. Princess Victoria, the eldest, had anorexia, and at age 20, the same age as Elsa, she left Sweden to get treatment. She then returned later, and resumed her princess duties. So, both Victoria and Elsa had emotional problems they needed to resolve, left their kingdoms to recover, and returned later to resume their duties.

Disney executives made a pact with Satan for this movie to have the success it has
Not that it doesn't deserve it, but damn this has achieved far more than even The Lion King. Also possibly as means to justify their decision to extinguish traditional animation. Because of this, all characters in the movie are doomed to go to Hell when they die.
  • And when Elsa reaches the fiery gates, the time will finally come for Hell to literally freeze over!
    • Except that the lowest level of Hell is frozen over.

Disney knew...
Disney used their psychic powers to see Winter Storm Titan before it happened. Knowing that it would increase viewership of a fitting movie, they made Frozen.

     Sequel 
A possible sequel will deal with a fire princess and further play with Disney Princess traditions
While Frozen deals with the horrific possibility of a princess becoming a villainous witch and Malevolence will go full cycle with it, it's foreshadowing about the ugly side of things in the Disney Universe are starting to show up after so long.

Case in point, magic is seen as something evil by society which leads to isolation and madness of otherwise kind and pure hearted girls. Like many people here stated that Elsa could have become the Snow Queen or that she could use her powers to lay waste to other countries, there will be another powerful magical princess with pyro kinetic abilities being used for war and who Elsa as the protagonist must return to the light of reason.

Bonus points if said Evil Counterpart is voiced by Kristin Chenoweth.
  • So Kristin Chenoweth voicing Azula.
  • There may be not a fire princess, but a fire prince from some neighboring kingdom going on a conquest spree. His armies, clad in high quality steel and armed with deadly smoke spewing 'fire-arms', are unyielding, led by his blazing glory in person. Arendelle is next, and it's up to Elsa to stop him. Possible Love Interest for her, possible evolution from Evil Prince or Prince Charmless to a more likable person. Possibly a Love Triangle for Elsa, though an inverted one compared to Anna's: politics will come before feelings. Possibly they'll balance out each other's Elemental Powers and eventually have an Avatar child. Er, scratch the last one. Possibly there'll be two weddings simultaneously: Elsa's pompous ceremony worthy of a Physical Goddess and Anna's modest but flowery one, foiling each other.
    • Said neighboring kingdom will be a counterpart of Iceland with the castle set atop a volcano.

The sequel is going to be a massive Crisis Crossover
  • Scotland is buried under an unnatural winter, and Princess Merida has to go on a quest to find out why. She visits a princess known to have experience with magic to ask for help. That princess doesn't know what to do, but she has a cousin who's particularly good with ice and snow... Cue Merida, Rapunzel and Elsa teaming up to restore the sun.

    Other 
Everyone is gay
  • Yes, even Olaf.
    • Actually, that does make sense, given he was born from Elsa's desires (the sun, Summer, be close to her sister, et cetera)
  • Well, that's just basic literary analysis, isn't it? (Speaking as the guy who posted the Oaken instance of this.)
  • Why "even Olaf"? There's no indication that he'd be straight so it's not really a weird suggestion. Anna and Kristoff, on the other hand, seem rather heterosexual (although they could be bi too), so they are the ones who are harder to argue being gay. (Though not impossible! They could be heteroromantic, for example. Or confusing friendship with romance due to social expectations.) The former King and Queen are easier to explain, since theirs could easily have been a marriage of convenience: they seem to be a happy family and to love each other but we can't know if they were in love with each other.

The inevitable Frozen Ever After short will focus on Elsa getting a consort.
And she'll discount every potential suitor as false and/or inadequate. One of them will be Hans's big brother.
  • Considering how much of a gay icon Elsa somehow became, this may cause riots.
    • Of course, the consort doesn't have to be male, though I doubt Disney will have that much of a backbone. Then again, the shorts aren't as widely watched as the movies themselves, so maybe they can get away with it as less Moral Guardians will be pissing themselves in rage.
    • Elsa is a gay icon because Idina Menzel originated one famous bisexual/lesbian role, and her second role had tons of Les Yay and takes place in Oz, which has a huge LGBT following.
  • Or they could just end the short with Elsa deciding she doesn't need a consort right now anyway.

Elsa's Ice Palace will be properly refurbished, and there will be a Snow Queen there 24/7/365.
The ruse will not draw off all the adventurers wandering in to "Free Arrendale From The Ice Witch's Grasp" (the Incident is bound to get severely distorted in the retelling without steamships and telegraphs in wide use); but the more gullible ones that bypass the capital to head straight for a lair in ice-bound reaches where it never thaws can chase some simulacra around a bit, smash something vaguely female & menacing heroically, and head home none the wiser as 'she' pulls herself together.
  • If Elsa does not reshape 'Marshmallow' into her decoy, then he/she/it gets to be The Dragon.
  • And yes, all the citizenry will be in on it. There will be some disappointment when the skate park has to be cleared in time for the Parade In Honor Of The Hero, and keeping straight faces will be a challenge.

Frozen takes place later then we thought
Not in the 21st century but sometime in the early-to-mid 20th. It's set in an AU universe which explains the Anachronism Stew.

The prison cell which Elsa is thrown into was built on her parents' orders years ago as a precaution in case their daughter ever went out of control
Many fan fiction writers point to the manacles she's made to wear as proof that the room was designed especially for her.
  • According to a tweet of Jennifer Lee's, it was Hans who had the manacles made.
  • The "prison cell" was aboard a boat. Most likely Han's boat.
  • No it wasn't. Ever seen a boat made out of stone?
  • It was probably just a regular cell that she was thrown into, not custom made for her unlike the manacles. Which is probably why she managed to escape so quickly after getting out of said manacles.

Elsa is a Conduit, and a very powerful one at that
Like her eventual successors Cole Macgrath and Delsin Rowe, Elsa is one of the small percentage of humans with the Conduit gene that allows for amazing abilities. Her abilities manifest as Ice/Snow, much like Lucy Kuo, though she seems to have a wider range of abilities.

The only problem is that she seems to have a wide range of abilities even after suppressing them for more than a decade. As Augustine tells Delsin during their final battle, right after he copies her concrete powers, it takes years to focus and strengthen a Conduit's powers; Delsin (and Cole, incidently, at least in this timeline) only developed their powers due to their exposure to Ray Field energy (Cole's powers were activated specifically BECAUSE of his exposure, Delsin's manifested naturally but were never seen because he'd never met another Conduit). It's entirely possible that Elsa was exposed to a large amount of Ray Field energy when she was a child (it would have to be, as she already expresses an amazing amount of control over her powers that early) or she could just be a gifted Conduit like the Cole from the original timeline (alias Kessler). It would certainly explain how she got her powers if no one else in her family has any abilities, as the Conduit gene's distribution is seemingly random.
  • And not just any Conduit, she's the ancestor of Lucy Kuo.

Frozen was very controversial when it was released in the Marvel Universe
A positive depiction of a mutant in a film aimed toward children? Never mind that Elsa wasn't the main character and was a reluctant villain for 2/3rds of the film, the overall message to mutants was "Don't isolate or repress your powers, but share them with the world" and the message to humans was "Don't fear or be prejudiced against mutants, but accept them for who they are." Friends of Humanity must have had a field day picketing the premiere!
  • Well, it obviously serves as a push towards metahuman openess: Look at all the harm that came from Elsa hiding her powers! She meant well, and her parents just wanted to protect her, but it ultimately put Elsa and everyone around her in even more danger; wouldn't it have been better for everyone to know about Elsa's power from the start? And shouldn't the people around her have the right to know about her abilities? Boy, it sure makes anyone who'd try to keep their special powers secret look like they really have something to hide...

Frozen is the birth of Disney Princess Theory
This isn't at all a concrete theory, but rather a pretty large series of coincidences. Disney has gone through some pretty interesting lengths to keep the Disney Princess franchise fresh in people's minds lately. Consider these points:

1. Tiana is the first African American princess, the most modern Disney princess, and the first official Disney Princess since 1998. Disney wants to draw in a new target demographic, and expressed regret that they did not draw in a good male audience, leading to an effort to capitalize on branding Flynn in Tangled.

2. The last four princesses have all been animated in CGI rather than Disney's typical style of 2D animation. Disney has played a lot recently with special effects in these movies, and the result is pretty good. The fact that Brave is a Pixar movie, however, may or may not mean that Merida will be left out of this new direction.

3. The princes in The Princess and the Frog, Tangled, and Brave all started out as being jerks. This could be some type of theme, or it could not be. Besides the fact that this goes directly against Disney's past standards, Hans is a subversion of this line of thinking, so this isn't my strongest argument. At least until the end of course!

4. Disney has two live action movies slated for the next two years, Maleficent and Cinderella, both of which are reduxes of Princesses they've already covered. These movies will probably retcon in events tying together the older set of Disney Princess movies. Maleficent will be told from the POV of the villain as well, which may prove to be good in terms of theory storytelling. They may also prove to be a good chance to tie in with the movie Enchanted.

5. See the WMG above on the Rapunzel cameo, as well as this link to the site, current home of Pixar Theory discussion. This is why I believe Frozen to be the birth of Princess theory, because it is the first obvious effort to tie multiple princesses to the same universe. The fact that they are so close together in the timeline also hints that they may be part of a certain subset.

6. Pixar Theory itself seems to be waning. Monsters University was a prequel that lent nothing to the greater timeline. Planes was created by John Lassiter, but was handed off to Disney Toon Studios. There is no Pixar movie slated for this year, and the next two, from what we know so far, just don't seem to fit. The Good Dinosaur is explicitly stated to be in an alternate dimension, which actually may hurt Pixar Theory in general. Unless they do work out, I think we can safely assume that Brave was the last of Pixar's great vision (which makes sense, seeing as it was decided to be the first and last movie in the timeline).

Elsa is the reason the Mushroom War happened
Because her army of "feminist water elemental warrior lesbians" took over Scandinavia, and Finn went back in time to stop her.

Elsa accidentally cursed Anna.
Elsa hits Anna with the ice blast, Anna freezes, does her act of true love, and thaws. But does that mean the ice, let alone the magic is out of her system? Not to mention that Pabbie and the King had a conversation communicated that Elsa's powers could be cursed onto someone else. Anna has been cursed with Elsa's powers, but it's not a big deal because they know how to thaw most accidental freezes (and Anna's rarely scared anyway). The last scene of the film could be before or after that revelation.


Fritz the CatWMG/Western Animation (Film)Gnomeo and Juliet

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