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Tropers: Wooper Winchester
What? I have a page for myself? That's kinda odd I guess, but hey, what ever suits this site. I mean the whole point is tropes after all. Well, I'm WooperWinchester, 'sup? Well, I suppose that I put tropes I worked on specifically or tropes that apply to me here, right? Hm, I'll get back onto that eventually, I guess.

Hey everyone, I actually have something to add! I RP a lot, see the useful note section of it if you don't know what it is, and I'm pissed at seeing pages of stupid ocs. So I'm making a guide on what to do! You're free to PM me about what you think should be added, removed, or if you just have some random comment. Though, a lot of this is just a summery of a bunch of articles on this site, just summarized into one thing. This guide is following an average oc format sheet on what one would normally fill out on making an oc. This is also partly my interpretation as a writer, reader, and Rper and don't hesitate to head to the main articles to see better explanations and examples, so don't take my guide for fault.

When I finally finish it, that is. Anyway, for this guide I'm going to be using a girl called Melissa Jones, who I created just for this sheet. I'm also making her up as I go along for this.

Here’s some advice/guide for an oc.:

Name: This is self-explanatory, a name should reflect where that person is from: some Asian kid, actually from Asia and not Asian-American, should not be called Melissa Jones, however that is an American name, so she's from New York instead.

Point two, long names are just stupid, they don’t add anything and tend to be linked to ocs: Ebony Dark'ness Dementia Raven Way is a good example of this and also shows another point, use real names and using ‘cool’ words for a name makes you look stupid, kills your credibility as a writer, marks a Mary Sue, and is just terrible.

Lastly, avoid Meaningful Name, not only is it annoying but it makes little sense in context, unless your characters parents/guardians already knew their future, and not just superstitious I'm-not-physic-but-I-know-it-will-happen-anyway-with-a-gut-feeling crap, actual people who have an idea, which can be good for Mythology fics. This can connect with Bilingual Bonus, but don't go overboard and remember the first two steps.

Nicknames: Same thing as above, though add in a little back story if the nickname is odd enough -if it's not glaringly obvious, explain it so it has a purpose and can be used later, for plot, or just to make sense-, however, don't add it in when you're describing your character and do it in a way that seems realistic, for example:
Don't do: 'Kasey blinked and rolled her eyes as John said "Aw cheer up, Flame!" Which Kasey had gained when she accidentally started a fire when she was six.'
or this
'Flame blinked, she had gotten the nickname when she was six and started a fire,...'

Both of those examples show to much simplicity and doesn't really contribute to the plot and when you do have one, don't go overboard. (see details) Though really, you don't want a generic nickname like Flame anyway, as even when you do explain it, it still sounds odd. Anyway, for this, let’s just say she’s called Milli for short.

Good examples: '"Aw, Flame, cheer up!" John announced with a grin to the brunette. Bob just raised an eyebrow "Flame?" Before Kasey could say a word John grinned "Yup, Kay-Kay here" and hell if that nickname didn't cause another glare "caused a fire when she was only six!" He chortled, and really...'
Or
'"Flame?" Bob stated with a raised brow, and before John could say a word, Kasey slapped a hand over his mouth with a glare, there was no way in hell she was bringing up THAT story again, really, start a fire one time when you're six and it stays with you forever.'

However, those examples broaden a character, seem more realistic, and contribute to the plot, which lets the writer seem more intelligent and learned.

Gender: I really can't do anything with this. Try to stick to one gender, though many zany antics can be had if they're 'both' or neither. Anyway, Milli is a girl for this.

In fanfiction, if you do Gender Bender a character, you need to keep two things in mind: 1, don't change the name to much, Harry Potter shouldn't become 'Yoshe Asmarlde Potter', for various reasons (see name) and 2, don't change their personality, because then it becomes a replacement fic with your oc as the main character, and usually being a Mary Sue. I'd advise not doing Gender Bender until you know your franchise like the back of your hand, including personalities for ALL the characters, as nearly all characters will have to interact differently as that main character is now a Gender Bender, and really, any series becomes Loads and Loads of Characters when doing this.

Age: Stay true to the age you chose. This can be rather difficult to do, especially if everyone’s isn’t doing it. Let’s say you have an oc that is about 8,a big problem people have is keeping that oc at age 8. Age is relative, but then you have people who have children sounding smarter than the teens and that character can actually forgot that they’re 8

The same thing if your character is 16 or so, remember that. There is a difference on being immature and being a man-child. You also need to be wary about standards, after all some roleplays end up with a 9 year old character best friends and on the same intellectual level as a 23 year old college graduate. That also leads to another point, choosing age is wary business, which is one reason way the age group of 15-17 is usually used. During that time the characters are more mature, slightly irresponsible and work better, plus since it’s so common a lot of others do it, which allows for easier interaction.

Another note is the type of story, if you have an RP in an abandoned world with monsters coming out at night to kill you, having an 8 year old is a bad idea. In comparison, some people give that 8 year old the mentality, endurance, aim, and overall attributes of a 20 year old. Just with the cuteness factor of being 8. Keep them realistic; your 8 year old isn’t a 18 year old so they don’t have the same social standing, endurance, or well, anything as a 'real' adult. An adult won’t take a child seriously, and unless you’re aiming for that, it can look rather stupid If that situation pops up and that adult is listening to someone 1/4th their age with rapid attention and not just humoring that child/your oc. Another big Mary Sue note is intelligence. Your 6 year old oc isn’t a genius, she can’t read Quantum Physics books, let alone understand them, play 5 instruments, speak 6 languages fluently, be a master of Occulmency, have mastered magic powers or anything like that. They’re 6, treat them as such. This can also apply, your character hasn’t mastered skills that logically take thrice as long to learn at 16.

Once again, also keep them at their age. I once read a bio of a 7 year old, really 1 –though, I don’t even want to know-, who had “Waist length black hair, dark brown skin, midnight blue eyes, rather tall, and pretty”…and she was 7. That’s creepy and no one wants to deal with that. Also, she was part cat, hated pink, and was a violent sadist with a crush on a robot. So yea, keep an eye out of that. I really hope that you get the big point with this.


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