Trivia / Garth Brooks

  • Actor Allusion: In his duet with Chris LeDoux, "Whatcha Gonna Do With a Cowboy", one line finishes "You'd be better off trying to rope the wind," sung by Chris in reference to Garth's third album.
    • Garth name drops two of Chris' songs in his tribute to him, "Good Ride Cowboy": And from "Bareback Jack" to "This Cowboy's Hat"...as well as mentioning the fact that Chris covered "Life is a Highway". He also name drops one of his own songs, "Much Too Young (to Feel This Damn Old)", which itself name-drops Chris.
  • Breakaway Country Hit: Garth had two: "To Make You Feel My Love" was attached to Hope Floats, and "When You Come Back To Me Again" was done for Frequency.
  • Creator Breakdown: A few fictional examples from In The Life Of Chris Gaines: Chris performed "Maybe" for his Straight Jacket album after one of his fellow band members from Crush died in an airplane accident. Then Chris created the Fornucopia album after his father passed away from cancer. The Apostle album came a few years after Chris was involved in an automobile accident and had to go through reconstructive surgery.
  • Creator Couple: He married fellow country singer Trisha Yearwood.
  • Keep Circulating the Tapes: For the longest time, the "third verse" version of "Friends in Low Places" was never commercially available. The third verse has proven extremely popular, as the crowd sings it by itself on the Double Live album.
    • For years, his TV concert specials. "This Is Garth Brooks" (1992) and "Garth Live From Central Park" (1997) were released on VHS in 1992 & 1998 respectively, but both went out-of-print relatively quick, while "This Is Garth Brooks II" (1994) saw its planned VHS release canceled, and "Garth Brooks Ireland & Back" (1998) was long forgotten after its initial NBC airing (save for a rare CMT rerun in 2002). All four specials were finally released on DVD in a box set in 2006, albeit with several edits made to all of them (and "Ireland & Back" being retitled "Garth Brooks Live From Dublin").
    • "It's Your Song" was released to radio in two forms: the live recording from Double Live, and an alternate studio version which is now very hard to find. (And people want to find it, since he corpses during the live version.)
  • Missing Episode: Garth lost a bunch of songs that would've formed the next album after Man Against Machine due to his cell phone breaking.
  • Name's the Same: His sound engineer (and, from Man Against Machine onward, producer) Mark Miller is not the same person as the lead singer of Sawyer Brown.
  • One-Hit Wonder: In universe, Chris Gaines' band Crush was this (their one hit is the final song of the Chris Gaines album, where Chris is not the lead singer).
    • Garth is this...in relation to the pop charts. His only hit on the Hot 100...was "Lost in You" from the Chris Gaines album.
  • Production Posse:
    • All of his albums were produced by Allen Reynolds except for In the Life of Chris Gaines, Man Against Machine, and Gunslinger. The former was produced by Don Was of Was (Not Was), and the latter two were produced by his sound engineer Mark Miller, who has also been with him from day one.
    • He has used many of the same session musicians from day one (again barring the Chris Gaines album), a group known collectively as the "G-Men": Bruce Bouton (steel guitar; also a member of his road band), Mark Casstevens (acoustic guitar), Mike Chapman (bass guitar), Rob Hajacos (fiddle), Chris Leuzinger (lead guitar), Milton Sledge (drums), and Bobby Wood (keyboards). Most of his backing vocals are provided by Robert Bailey and Vicki Hampton (who also serve this capacity in his road band), as well as Trisha Yearwood even before he married her. The "G-Men" also played on many albums produced by Allen Reynolds in The '90s, including those by Kathy Mattea and Hal Ketchum; they also played on Ty England's Highways and Dance Halls, which Garth produced. (Ty was formerly a guitarist in Garth's road band.)
    • Over the years, many members of his road band have played on his albums, including Bouton, Mike Palmer (drums), Mark Greenwood (bass), Jimmy Mattingly (fiddle), Dave Gant (keyboards), along with former members Ty England and James Garver (both guitarists).
    • Every album except No Fences, In the Life of Chris Gaines, and Man Against Machine has had at least one song written by Kent Blazy. Other frequent writing partners include Kim Williams, Victoria Shaw, Stephanie Davis, and Tony Arata.
  • Stillborn Franchise: The Chris Gaines stuff.
  • Throw It In: "Friends in Low Places" has an audible click near the end when someone opens a beer can, which was initially mistaken for a mastering error. Garth also screams "Push, Marie!" a few seconds later, in reference to his guitarist's wife, who was in the hospital at the time.
    • "Mr. Right" on the Ropin' the Wind album, has Garth chuckling and saying "You guys!" in the pause after the instrumental break in the second chorus.
  • What Could Have Been: The entire face of 1990s country music could've been changed if Mark Chesnutt had released his (considerably more downbeat) version of "Friends in Low Places" instead of Garth.
    • Garth did do the demo for the song (the last demo he'd ever have to do), and he claims that Capitol was holding the song for him, anyway.
    • How would Chris Gaines be treated if The Lamb were actually made?
    • Garth was supposed to include "Ten Rounds with Jose Cuervo" on Scarecrow, but Tracy Byrd cut it at the same time. According to Byrd himself, he called up Garth and said he wanted to put it out a single, so Garth gave Byrd his blessing.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Trivia/GarthBrooks