Nightmare Fuel: Boards of Canada

  • The entirety of Geogaddi is deeply unsettling, with deceptively sunny keyboads filtered through tape recorders that make them sound broken and distorted. Particularly creepy tracks include:
    • Right out of the box with "Ready Let's Go", which is little more than an oscillating drone.
    • "Music is Math," the second track and the first full song on the album, sets the tone. The lyrics are hard to make out (as they're being sung in a near-incomprehensible, tribal wail filtered through a vocoder) but consensus seems to be that they are: "all falls down... all falls down... down..."
    • "You Could Feel The Sky."
    • "1969" crosses Boards of Canada's Right to Children-era sunny sound with unsettling vocoder bits and references to cults. In fact, it's about the Branch Davidian cult, which maintained a Stepford Smiler facade while their leader sexually abused children.
    • "A is to B as B is to C" , with its strange, garbled loops and samples. Towards the end of the track, an ominous backmasked chorus chants something that sounds astonishingly like "O Geogaddi! O Geogaddi!"
    • "The Devil is in the Details," which is about hypnosis. Not a good idea to listen to in a dark room.
    • "Alpha and Omega", which gradually becomes more and more frantic and incomprehensible, and three-fourths into the song a loud and unexpected "YOLO" is spoken.
    • "Opening The Mouth." My God.
  • "Beware the Friendly Stranger". The more you look into the song, the worse it gets.
  • The cover of Music Has the Right to Children anyone? The Faceless...
    • The inside of the album has each of their faces magnified. Ugh.
    • Plus, the "I... Lovveee... You..." samples on "The Color Of The Fire." Downright Uncanny Valley stuff right here.
  • In a Beautiful Place Out in the Country. The whole EP has an unsettling atmosphere, especially "Amo Bishop Roden" and the title track.
  • Tomorrow's Harvest. An apocalyptic dread is present through the whole album, from the opening bleakness of "Gemini" to the Downer Ending of "Semena Mertvykh".
  • Their remix (under the "Hell Interface" alias) of Colonel Abrams' "Trapped" turns an upbeat pop song into a horrifying song about love gone wrong.