Headscratchers / Event Horizon

  • When Weir come under the influence of the entity possessing the Event Horizon, is it him succumbing to insanity? Or is it the Event Horizon itself possessing him and speaking through him?
    • We'll never know, but the novelization implies that the Weir is dead, and an entity from Hell is using his form and voice. In the final fight, the entity spits and says that Weir (in the third person) was weak.
    • Likewise, is Justin merely acting deranged from his exposure to the other realm? Or did the entity possessing the ship temporarily possess him and speak through him? His stunned reaction when he discovers himself in the air lock suggests the latter.
  • In the final scene of the film, is Starck merely having a nightmare? Is she experiencing an anxiety attack due to the trauma she just experienced? Or are the remains of the Event Horizon still possessed and tormenting her?
    • The ambiguous nature of that is probably the point.
    • Related to this, however, is the fact that in her "nightmare" she sees Weir as he looked after the ship brought him back...something SHE DIDN'T KNOW...
      • Although this part apparently had more ambiguity in the original cut: part of one cut scene has the scar-covered Weir crawling down after Starck and Cooper after Starck is flushed down the ladder by the blood tidal wave.
    • I see no reason it couldn't be all three. That damned ship is evil as hell.
    • The way the spiked doors ominously close on the survivors and the rescue crew at the end seem to imply that the remains of the Event Horizon are still possessed and functioning.
    • On the other hand, Weir has a nightmare as he's coming out of stasis earlier in the movie, and it's implied that it's not an uncommon occurrence. Starck may simply have been having an extra-strength nightmare due to... well, the Event Horizon itself being terror incarnate.
  • So why is this a Warhammer 40k movie? Might it be possible that the creators never heard of Warhammer?
    • Event Horizon is not related to the Warhammer 40000 universe at all. It's just a joke that 40k fans like to tell due to similarities. Ship makes a Warpjump... uh, I mean experimental FTL jump, which causes the ship to fly into the Warp... uh, I mean Hell, and makes the crew fall to Chaos... uh, I mean go utterly batshit, and then the ship gets possessed by daemons... uh, I mean generally becomes this weird sentient place that drives everyone mad, and then Weir gets possessed by a daemon... uh, I mean, well you know.
      • It's not just the mechanical function of things; that alone is enough to make the Doom connection, since Doom is very light on plot, but not 40k, since 40k has a lot more to dive through than "mechanics of FTL travel." What sells the idea is the fact that, beyond that, the film has an extremely similar design aesthetic to 40k; the note on the YMMV page that it wouldn't be hard to fool a 40k fan who's never seen heard of the movie into thinking it's intended to be 40k isn't much of an exaggeration, if at all. No, no one thinks it's supposed to be a 40k film, but you wouldn't have to change anything for it to be one.
      • Added to that, it's very similar in overall theme and tone to some of the more horrific stuff in the 40k fluff. And the design aesthetic, as mentioned, is very similar. Compare the Event Horizon and some Imperial ships, and it's easy to think that one design eventually lead to the others. Also, the place the Event Horizon went is described as "a place of pure chaos," to which any 40k fan will nod sagely and say "that's what happens when you forget to turn on the Gellar field." It's almost certain that the filmmaker's had no knowledge of 40k, and the points of commonality are just coincidental, but they're good enough that the film actually could be slipped into 40k canon (such as it is) without any difficulty.
  • Within a minute a crew member can understand that it's Latin in the Event Horizon's last transmission, but the entire accident investigation team that Earth presumably would have had in "The largest space accident ever" no one noticed?
    • They didn't have it to hand: that was the ship's log version recorded on the local disc. Odds are, the scrambled bit never made it beyond the singularity until the Event Horizon came back to be found.
      • Yes they did. The recording was played during the briefing before the crew reached the Event Horizon. The very reason the crew was going on this rescue mission was because Earth heard the ship's distress call.
      • Just because part of the message made it through doesn't mean the whole thing did. It's very easy for enough of the message to get garbled in transmission that they made the simple mistake.
      • Even if the folks on Earth were aware of what the message actually said, the Event Horizon and what happened to her is too valuable to simply ignore. This is humanity's shot at getting out of our own solar system, our chance to survive the eventual death of our sun, there's no way everyone's going to ignore that just because the distress call is vaguely creepy.

  • After the Lewis & Clarke is damaged, why not simply use the Event Horizon's conventional engines to return to Earth? When it disappeared, it was provisioned for a return flight for a much larger crew, so supplies shouldn't be an issue, nor should fuel. Granted, after seven years the engines flight-worthiness may have degraded, but the crew never seems to consider the issue.
    • Um, you're suggesting that they intentionally stay on the Event Horizon? Not only that, but intentionally bring it closer to Earth? Sure, why not? What could possibly go wrong?
    • Plus, the Lewis and Clarke's crew is trained in the operation of their own ship, not the Event Horizon. And they were all already sufficiently creeped out that none of them wanted to be on that ship a moment longer than necessary. Even without the (at the point, largely unknown) potential of bringing some horrific Eldritch Abomination back to Earth, none of them were in any mood to screw around with this obviously fucked-up ship.
    • One point that was made early on was that the Event Horizon's air filtration system had been corroded, thus causing carbon dioxide buildup (similar to what happened to Apollo 13) that would eventually suffocate the crew in less than a day. Further on, it took the Event Horizon a whole year to reach Neptune on conventional propulsion, and that was before whatever damage its trip to Hell caused it (which may have extended to its sub-light drives). Thus the reason why the crew was adamant about getting the Clark back up and running; to remain on the Event Horizon in itself (even discounting the Eldritch presence) would have been literal suicide.

  • One minor one - the Lewis & Clarke crew is disturbed by received radio transmissions from when the Event Horizon first appeared, yet, when stranded on the Event Horizon, Starke reads off the communications system is offline.... so how did the EH send the message?
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Headscratchers/EventHorizon