Funny: Ulysses

  • The ending of Sirens, when Bloom bids farewell to Richie Goulding whilst increasingly distracted by the fact he has gas. He debates whether wine or cider is to blame, manages to get away from Goulding and then farts under cover of a passing tram.
    "Pprrpffrrppffff. Done."
  • The end of the Cyclops chapter, where Bloom is bundled into a cab and the Citizen throws an empty biscuit tin after him, and the impact of the biscuit tin is told as a parody of a news story about a major natural disaster which morphs in and out of something seriously biblical. Also, the main narrator of that chapter (whose name we never learn and who never appears anywhere else in the book) is an extremely dark Deadpan Snarker with Jade-Colored Glasses, some of whose unfavourable judgments of people he supposedly considers his friends are very funny.
  • Nausicaa has a couple of darkly comic moments: first, Gerty's flowery narration is frequently interrupted by snarky asides about her friends. Second, Gerty's narration as she admires Bloom from afar is sort of ridiculous, especially when the reader begins to suspect Bloom is masturbating over her, and that Bloom might just be imagining Gerty is admiring him to get himself off. Despite this, the reveal as Bloom orgasms, accompanied by a fireworks display, and we switch to his point of view, is still pervertedly hilarious. Finally, Bloom watches Gerty get up, realises she is lame in one leg, and immediately regrets what he just did.
  • In Oxen of the Sun, Bloom's bee sting is described in medieval terms as the result of an attack by a wyrm; i.e. a dragon.
  • Circe has humour in spades:
    • Bloom's imagined trial, especially the passages featuring several aristocratic women who claim he sent them dirty letters and recount the letters in excruciating detail, before whipping Bloom gleefully. Which he enjoys.
    "BLOOM: [...] Let me off this once. (He offers the other cheek)
    MRS YELVERTON BARRY: (Severely) Don't do so on any account, Mrs Talboys! He should be soundly trounced!"
    • Bloom's ridiculous Power Fantasy.
    • Bloom's grandfather materialising to give him sexual advice.
    • Stephen's hallucination of two Oxford professors hovering in midair with lawnmowers, which appears to be a parody of Good Angel, Bad Angel, if not for the fact that this trope didn't really exist at the time Ulysses was written.
    • Bloom's Gender Bender fantasy, while disturbing (bordering on Nightmare Fuel), is also very, very funny.
    "I shall sit on your ottoman saddleback every morning after my thumping good breakfast of Matterson's fat hamrashers and a bottle of Guinness's porter. (He belches) And suck my thumping good Stock Exchange cigar while I read the Licensed Victualler's Gazette. Very possibly I shall have you slaughtered and skewered in my stables and enjoy a slice of you with crisp crackling from the baking tin basted and baked like sucking pig with rice and lemon or currant sauce."
    • Stephen runs off into the night after breaking a chandelier, and Bloom apologetically settles up.
    • Stephen's exchange with the furious British soldiers, as he calmly tries to persuade them not to punch him and is met with a barrage of insults.
    • Figures from Irish folklore turn up to moderate the fight between Stephen and the soldiers, including the Croppy Boy, who dies. We then get this pure gold line:
    "(He gives up the ghost. A violent erection of the hanged sends gouts of sperm spouting through his deathclothes on to the cobblestones. Mrs Bellingham, Mrs Yelverton Barry and the Honourable Mrs Mervyn Talboys rush forward with their handkerchiefs to sop it up.)''