Film: Frida

Frida (2002) is a biographical film which depicts the professional and private life of the surrealist Mexican painter Frida Kahlo. It stars Salma Hayek as Kahlo (nominated for an Academy Award) and Alfred Molina as her husband, Diego Rivera.

The movie was adapted by Clancy Sigal, Diane Lake, Gregory Nava, Anna Thomas and Edward Norton (uncredited) from the book Frida: A Biography of Frida Kahlo by Hayden Herrera. It was directed by Julie Taymor. It won Oscars for Best Makeup and Best Original Music Score (receipient: Elliot Goldenthal).


This film provides examples of:

  • Adaptational Attractiveness: A slight case. Kahlo wasn't ugly, but she certainly didn't look like Salma Hayek either. Yay! With a unibrow. Wha? And a thin but prominent mustache. Oh, God... You may hear many jokes about Alfred Molina being too handsome to portray Diego Rivera... half of those are being serious.
  • All Girls Want Bad Boys: This could be one of Diego's main attractions.
  • Amicable Exes: Diego's is amiable enough with his second wife Lupe to give her a place to stay as she searches for a job. Just as they were friends in real life, Lupe and Frida become a literal case of Amiable Exes of Diego, getting along and confiding in each other, during Frida's estrangement from Diego.
  • Aw They Really Do Love Each Other: Frida has a bit of an uneasy relationship with her mother but they care deeply for each other.
  • Big Ol' Unibrow: Frida made a point of emphasizing her unibrow in all her self-portraits. This was mainly due to Kahlo's horrible self-esteem. In photographs, Kahlo's actually not bad looking, even with the unibrow. But in her self-portraits, Kahlo was notorious for putting emphasis on her uglier features, with her unibrow, mustache, and beauty mark getting special attention.
  • Bi the Way: Frida, Gracie (Saffron Burrows), Josephine Baker (Karine Plantadit-Bageot), and implied with Tina Modotti (Ashley Judd).
  • Contrived Coincidence: When Frida and Diego share their first kiss, the street lights suddenly lit up. She asks if he arranged for that. He jokingly responds that it costed him a fortune.
  • The Cameo: Ashley Judd, Antonio Banderas, Geoffrey Rush, Edward Norton, etc. They are all one or two scene wonders.
  • Dirty Communist: Averted. The main characters are socialists, as are many of the supporting characters. They're decent people for the most part.
  • Fake Nationality:
  • Go Out with a Smile: The final visual of the film suggests this.
  • Handicapped Badass: Frida, post-accident.
  • Imagine Spot: Many scenes are recreations of Frida's paintings.
  • Impaled with Extreme Prejudice: The handrail that impaled Kalho in a trolley accident.
  • Kavorka Man: Diego is a middle age fat man with a temper, yet he was an intense womanizer. This is apparently Truth in Television.
    "You'd never believe it, but he's had half the women in this room."
  • Law of Inverse Fertility: Frida gets a glimpse of Lupa's children and its implied she envies Lupa. However, the life-long injuries from the bus crash causes a miscarriage.
  • May-December Romance:
    • Frida and Trotsky.
    • Frida and Diego to a lesser extent.
  • Mononymous Biopic Title: A first name variation.
  • My God, What Have I Done?: Frida, when she realizes she took part in ruining Leon's marriage. Likewise, Leon too.
  • Naytheist: Inverted with Diego's line: "I don't believe in God but I thank him every day for giving me you."
  • Stepford Snarker: Frida had always enjoyed snarking before the bus accident and its implied snarking humorously helped her cope with the pain in its aftermath.
  • Protagonist Title
  • "The Reason You Suck" Speech: Frida gives Diego one when he's angry over her affair with Trotsky.
  • Ugly Guy, Hot Wife: Diego (despite his slight Adaptational Attractiveness upgrade) and Frida. . .and the numerous other gorgeous women he's able to hook up with throughout the course of the movie.
  • Your Cheating Heart: A constant fault in Diego's character to the point where his adulterous habits is more of a "don't say I didn't warn you" deal. He ends up crossing a line when he sleeps with Frida's sister. The trope is downplayed on Frida's side as it mentions little about her affairs with men in her marriage, though Diego did not mind her affairs with women.