Awesome: The Iliad

  • Automedon's charging the Trojan lines and then going head to head with Hector for a brief time, and comes out alive.
  • Menelaus, who is described as being the weakest warrior of the Greek kings and yet pulls off some of the most courageous actions.
  • Diomedes goes on a rampage through the Trojan army, killing everyone he comes across, wounding Aphrodite and Ares, forcing the God of War to flee from him. The Trojans fear him more than ACHILLES (though considering the fact that he stayed in his tent for 90% of the poem probably factored into that), the only person who he couldn't defeat was Hector, the greatest Trojan warrior, and that was because Zeus himself sent a thunderbolt to tell Diomedes to not fight him. Even more so when you realize that Diomedes, unlike Achilles, is ''fully mortal''.
  • The first thing Achilles does when he gets out of his tent? He lets out three war cries, one after another, and kills twelve Trojans by doing so.
  • The only major warrior on both sides never shown to receive help from a god is Agamemnon.
  • Helen standing up to Aphrodite. Even if Aphrodite threatens her into submission immediately after, it's nice to see someone in Greek mythology tell a god what a jerk she is.
  • Hector fighting Achilles. The best-known duel in all of Western literature.
  • Agamemnon! Contrary to some post-Homeric portrayals, in Book 2, he's said to have the:
    Head and eyes of Zeus, chest like Poseidon, waist like Ares.
    • In Book 3, King Priam stares at him from the walls and asks Helen:
    Who is this huge warrior, this Achaean so great and strong? Many others are taller by a head but my eyes have never beheld one so handsome or noble. That man must be a king!
    • In Book 7, he's the first to volunteer to fight Hector after Nestor's speech and along with Diomedes and Great Ajax is one of the three most wished for:
    Father Zeus grant that the lot fall to (Great) Ajax or to the son of Tydeus (Diomedes) or to the king himself of all Mycenae's gold (Agamemnon).
    • In Book 11, Agamemnon has his aristeia or day of glory and is killing Trojans left and right like a killing machine, forcing them all to flee, and his day of glory is most similar to Achilles' in style and structure, even HECTOR is told to stay away by Zeus.
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